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Runole

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« : August 11, 2011, 02:54:22 PM »

This subject has been brought up often in the media and by talk show hosts...

I found this article rather interesting..

Football Players Receive $17,000 Annually in Cash, all within NCAA Rules
May 22, 2011 10:52 pm, UTC



That’s it. I have had it with the inane and redundant talk about NCAA football student-athletes, specifically football players, not being able pay for a tank of gas or afford a combo meal at Subway. Stop it! Enough is enough. These kids are given ample resources to “survive” during their years on a college campus, and I will prove it to you. I will show you not only the value of a scholarship, but the cash and benefits student-athletes can get all within NCAA rules.

If this is your first time to Holy Turf, welcome. Let me give you some quick background information. I spent nine years working inside athletic departments at Arkansas and Baylor as an academic advisor for student-athletes. I have seen the inner workings of two athletic departments in two major conferences. Let’s get back to the task at hand. I live in Fayetteville, Arkansas, the home of the Razorbacks. In this article, I am going to use Arkansas as my example.

Before we get to the value of a scholarship, let’s start off with the amount of money available to football student-athletes within NCAA rules.

Pell Grant
Many football student-athletes qualify for a Pell Grant based on several factors, but most earn a Pell Grant based on a lack of wealth from their parents. According to collegeboard.com, “The U.S. Department of Education uses a standard formula to evaluate the information you supply when applying for a Pell Grant. This formula produces a number called the Expected Family Contribution (EFC), which determines if you are eligible. The grant requires that you: 1. Are an undergraduate student who has not earned a bachelor’s degree. 2. Are a U.S. citizen or an eligible noncitizen. 3. Have a high school diploma or a GED, or demonstrate the ability to benefit from the program”

A full Pell Grant is worth $5,500 a year and never has to be repaid because it is a grant, not a loan. Football players get $5,500 each year to do with what they want.

Clothing Money
If a football player qualifies for a Pell Grant, they also get $500 of clothing allowance each year. My memory fails me, but I am almost certain this money is from the conference. Football players can buy whatever clothes they want as long as they bring back $500 worth of receipts to their Compliance department showing the clothes they bought. Now, many football players will spend this money on new Nike’s, hats, jeans or t–shirts. This money could be spent on buying a nice suit, or a few pairs of khaki pants and some button down shirts, but rarely is that the case.

Commissioner's like the Big 10's Jim Delaney talk about full cost scholarships, but remember that goes to every student-athlete on a full scholarship, not just football players.

Student-Athlete Opportunity Fund
According to Bylaw 15.01.6.2 in the NCAA Manual, each athletic department can use the student-athlete opportunity fund money for anything but financing salaries, scholarships (though paying for summer school is allowed, but a football player’s scholarship covers summer school), capital improvements, stipends, and outside athletic development. The NCAA gives each school a chunk of money each year…roughly $200,000 to help student-athletes out with whatever needs they may have deemed fit by the senior staff member in the athletic department in charge of the money. This money is not just for football, but the entire athletic department. Regardless, if a football player needs money to pay for gas, more new clothes, or a plane ride home, they can legally get money for that.

Special Assistance Fund
Football players also have access to a special assistance fund too. According to NCAA bylaw 16.12.2, money from the special assistance fund may be requested as additional financial aid (with no obligation to repay such aid) for special financial needs for student-athletes. I know one school used this fund to fly their basketball players home for the Christmas break. Completely within NCAA rules.

Room and Board
Football players typically live on campus with a meal plan at the dining hall during their freshman years. In this case, their scholarship covers all of the cost for their dorm room and meal plan. Most players will live off campus after their freshman year as long as the coach allows it, which is usually determined by how the student-athlete is doing in school. Football players living off campus get a room and board check equal to the amount their university lists in the costs to attend. For Arkansas, it is $4,021 for each fall and spring semester based off of this figure. A total of $8,024 for both semesters. Almost all scholarship football players stay in town for summer school to take care of their academics and workout. Arkansas has 16-week fall and spring semesters. The two summer sessions are a total of 12 weeks. Using that logic, Arkansas football players get 75% (12 weeks instead of 16) of $4,021, which is $3,016.

Here is one non-monetary benefit that may interest readers.

Occasional Meal
NCAA Bylaw 16.11.1.5 allows for a student-athlete or an entire team in a sport to have an occasional meal paid for by a representative of athletics interest, also known as a booster, on infrequent and special occasions. The booster can even provide local transportation as long as the meal is at the booster’s house and not a restaurant. The meal cannot be at a house, but can be catered. The meal can be as lavish as the booster wants to provide. Most schools have a form for boosters to fill out before hosting a student-athlete or team. This is another way to feed student-athletes.

The typical non-freshman Arkansas football player received the cash listed below in 2010-11:
$5,500- Pell Grant
$500- Clothing Fund
$8,024- Fall and Spring Room and Board
$3,016- Summer Room and Board

$17,040- Grand Total

Remember, this excludes any money from the Student-Athlete Opportunity Fund, the Special Assistance Fund, and any occasional meals provided by boosters. Monthly, football players are looking at $1,420 cash in their pocket without having to buy books or pay tuition and fees. Did you have $1,420 of cash every month in college? If football players were to work a job paying a respectable $10 an hour, they would need to work 36 hours a week for 50 weeks to make $1,420 before taxes to make what they get from their football scholarship and other available money sources.

SEC Commissioner Mike Slive recently said, ""I have long thought that we should revisit the limitations on the current scholarship model and perhaps expand it to cover the full cost of attendance. I look forward to that discussion."

How much does it cost to live in an apartment in Fayetteville? One of, if not, the nicest apartments on the edge of campus costs $480 per person for a two bedroom apartment. Another nice apartment about a mile from campus costs $350 per person for a two bedroom apartment. If we split the difference at $415 per person, our football players have over $1,000 remaining from their monthly income after paying for rent and remember, they have no bills for tuition, books, or fees. Still think these guys cannot afford a tank of gas, a date, or any other reasonable expenditure for a college student?

Football is a ‘head count’ sport according to the NCAA. This means that football student-athletes are either on a full scholarship or not on any athletic scholarship. There is no middle ground. A full scholarship covers tuition, fees, books, room, and board. We covered the money a football player actually receives. Now, we will look at the added value of a scholarship. At Arkansas a student taking 30 credit hours would pay just under $8,000 as an in-state student for tuition, fees, and books. A non-resident would pay $17,162 for the same. Many football players will also take summer school during both summer sessions. The average expense for an in-state student taking nine summer hours is roughly $2,000. For an out of state student, the cost is closer to $4,500.

Scholarships are renewable each year for up to five years while student-athletes can only compete four seasons. Coaches can choose to not award a scholarship to a returning student-athlete at the end of each year for any reason. For our sake, we will assume our football players will be at school for five years because many redshirt or lose a year to a medical redshirt. In-state Arkansas students get $50,000 in value over five years from their scholarship covering tuition, books, and fees to go along with the roughly $17,000 a year we calculated above. In total, a football scholarship is worth $135,000 to football player at Arkansas from the state of Arkansas. Football players from out of state get roughly $108,000 in value over five years from their scholarship covering tuition, books, and fees in addition to the $17,000 a year listed above for a five year value of roughly $193,000.

I am not sure if I changed your mind on whether or not athletes should get paid, but next time you hear a talking head whining about football players not being able to afford money for a tank of gas or to take a lady out on a date you will know the facts. Most football players at BCS schools have a surplus of cash each month to spend however they choose.


Link

http://www.holyturf.com/2011/05/football-players-receive-17000-annually-in-cash-all-within-ncaa-rules/



Certainly looks like once again these incredibly  spoiled players are whining just a bit too much about nothing!

GameTime

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« #1 : August 12, 2011, 10:22:02 AM »

agree 100% with the premise of the article.

\"Lets put the O back in Country\"

dalbuc

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« #2 : August 13, 2011, 10:56:59 AM »

Well and that doesn't get to all the perks they get. Their dorms are usually better. Their food is better. They have access to tutors and councilors that the normal student body doesn't have access to. To say they aren't being paid is silly, plenty of kids work long hours trying to earn the cash just given to the athletes.

In the end, most colleges don't make money off their athletics programs. Other than the biggest of the big name schools most won't make money and even the big name places only make scratch off football and a few places basketball. All the other sports and womens sports are money losers.  While I think you could get away with paying the football team at LSU but not the men's track team under title 9 you'd have to pay out the same $$$ for the female athletes you pay to the males so whatever you think you'd pay to the players you need to actually double that cost.

All posts are opinions in case you are too stupid to figure that out on your own without me saying it over and over.

John Galt?

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« #3 : August 13, 2011, 04:22:46 PM »

So if a player needs more money, why can't they do what I did- GET A JOB??

The NCAA limits the amount of time they can practice, still plenty of time to wait some tables, deliver some pizzas, or flip some burgers. Especially during the spring semester. When I went to school I didn't get ANY scholarship. Pell Grants then were $850/semester and classes cost about $400 plus another $200 for books. So I got a job. Classes 9:30-1:00 study/workout/fartaround 1:30-4:30 and off to work from 5:00-1:00am on Thurs-Sunday and sometimes one other day. Made about $80/nite 4 nites a week (sometimes 5) and those were 1980s dollars. No free dorms or rent, no free food (other than pizza) and plenty of time to earn a 3.4 GPA and get a BSBA.

I don't see why a student athlete can't get a job at $8-9/hr for 15-20 hours/week if they want an extra $150-200/week pocket $$. Since they get free rent, free utilities, free tuition, free books, and free food, any money they earn is pocket money. Also there is a thing called "summer jobs". June July and August you haul some bricks or grab a shovel or sell magazines or do whatever is available. I found I could make $3-$4k during the summer months. I'm sure an OL could get a nite or summer job as security or a bouncer.

That's the problem with the whole country-everyone wants something for nothing.


Runole

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« #4 : August 13, 2011, 05:34:25 PM »

Someone needs to send the article to Dan Sileo.. Is he still on the air?  He is one of those that rants and raves about this constantly.

If anything the amount of coddling and enabling has gone off the charts the last decade.   Some Junior in high school announcing to the world on National TV he put 4 schools on his list but is waiting on "getting more love"  from some other school!! :'(

John Galt?

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« #5 : August 13, 2011, 07:28:41 PM »

Here's how I see it. A student athlete gets free rent, cable, electric, water- about $400/month worth, free food at the team cafeteria another $500 worth. 10 months worth of that is $9000. Tuition is $6000 or more, Books another $1200, free health care another $2000 so that is $18,200. He also gets the opportunity to earn a career in professional sports at $1 million to $20 million per year.

I say if that isn't enough...GET A JOB


JayAuggs

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« #6 : August 17, 2011, 10:41:36 PM »

Here's how I see it. A student athlete gets free rent, cable, electric, water- about $400/month worth, free food at the team cafeteria another $500 worth. 10 months worth of that is $9000. Tuition is $6000 or more, Books another $1200, free health care another $2000 so that is $18,200. He also gets the opportunity to earn a career in professional sports at $1 million to $20 million per year.

I say if that isn't enough...GET A JOB

You clearly have never known a collegiate athlete.



Runole

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« #7 : August 19, 2011, 06:00:46 PM »

Here's how I see it. A student athlete gets free rent, cable, electric, water- about $400/month worth, free food at the team cafeteria another $500 worth. 10 months worth of that is $9000. Tuition is $6000 or more, Books another $1200, free health care another $2000 so that is $18,200. He also gets the opportunity to earn a career in professional sports at $1 million to $20 million per year.

I say if that isn't enough...GET A JOB

You clearly have never known a collegiate athlete.

Explain?

John Galt?

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« #8 : August 20, 2011, 01:16:31 PM »

Here's how I see it. A student athlete gets free rent, cable, electric, water- about $400/month worth, free food at the team cafeteria another $500 worth. 10 months worth of that is $9000. Tuition is $6000 or more, Books another $1200, free health care another $2000 so that is $18,200. He also gets the opportunity to earn a career in professional sports at $1 million to $20 million per year.

I say if that isn't enough...GET A JOB

You clearly have never known a collegiate athlete.



Actually, when I was at UF and delivering Pizza, the one place all the drivers hated to go was Yon Hall, the athletic dorms. Not only did they not tip, they had an attitude of entitlement over even having to pay for the pizza. Now Yon Hall was just Football and BBall players, the other sports scholly guys were scattered thru all the other dorms. Actually had a tennis player and a swimmer work with us (their scholarships were quite a bit less than the FB/BB schollies). Does tennis and swimming count?



rpc1978

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« #9 : August 21, 2011, 12:35:34 PM »

These guys want to live the high life. Sure, they legally get paid their stipends but for some their expenses go beyond that. Living for free in the athletic dorms isn't good enough, they want to get a cool apartment off campus.  If they are living off campus they want to get a nice car to drive to school.  Not just any clothes or jewelry will do.  You got to look fresh!  Video games and block parties on the weekends?  Why do that when you know a "friend of the program" who can get you VIP access to strip clubs and night clubs? These things cost money.  No matter how much you give these guys there will always be someone out there willing to give them a little extra and if they think they can get away with it they'll take it.   

Runole

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« #10 : August 24, 2011, 12:04:25 AM »

Hey the answer is go to Miami they evidently treat their players real good!! :o

Have to admit that was a bit cruel.  Truthful but cruel.

GameTime

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« #11 : August 24, 2011, 02:51:33 PM »

Hey the answer is go to Miami they evidently treat their players real good!! :o

not so quick though...seems odd to me with consistent 8-5 seasons that fsu has quickly and impressively notched some top5 classes the last few years...

that said, i think every school is probably doing something shady...some just better than others.  and no runole, i do not think fsu is doing anything close to miami...but it does raise an eyebrow to me.

\"Lets put the O back in Country\"

TheAman

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« #12 : August 24, 2011, 08:18:47 PM »

Here's the problem.  Every other student, no matter how much they're making on scholarship, can capitalize on their skills to make some money.  If you're a journalist, you can get paid for writing in the newspaper, if you're some sort of researcher, a lot of times you get paid for doing your research on campus.  Football players can't do this, and quite frankly, there's no reason for it.  You don't have to pay them, however, let them get paid for their skills.  If someone wants to sponsor them, let them do it.  If Olympic athletes are still "amateurs" while they get sponsored, then that should satisfy the NCAA too.

And no, most college football players cannot get jobs.  Between classes, homework, official practices, workouts and games, they have basically no time on their schedule.

GameTime

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« #13 : August 24, 2011, 09:06:00 PM »

Here's the problem.  Every other student, no matter how much they're making on scholarship, can capitalize on their skills to make some money.  If you're a journalist, you can get paid for writing in the newspaper, if you're some sort of researcher, a lot of times you get paid for doing your research on campus.  Football players can't do this, and quite frankly, there's no reason for it.  You don't have to pay them, however, let them get paid for their skills.  If someone wants to sponsor them, let them do it.  If Olympic athletes are still "amateurs" while they get sponsored, then that should satisfy the NCAA too.

And no, most college football players cannot get jobs.  Between classes, homework, official practices, workouts and games, they have basically no time on their schedule.

correct me if i am wrong, but there is no scholarship more valuable than college football.  letting college football player become sponsored is opening up pandoras box.  and there are reasons why college players cant/shouldnt work.  football is their job for starters, and secondly is pandoras box with letting CFB players get paid.
« : August 24, 2011, 09:08:18 PM GameTime »

\"Lets put the O back in Country\"

TheAman

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« #14 : August 24, 2011, 09:17:24 PM »

Football is their job, but they don't get paid.  You do see the problem with that right?

And you are wrong, especially if you are counting graduate scholarships in there.  Some graduate scholarships include huge stipends.
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