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wreck ship

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#15 : April 16, 2012, 09:34:37 PM

Workforce participation is at the lowest it's been in 30 years....since the recession of the 70s. And there is no indication it's going to improve anytime soon.

Wages are falling while costs of living continue to increase. The statistics show the gap between the rich and poor is widening and the middle class is shrinking.

These are not sustainable economic trends. The American dream is in serious jeopardy.

Education used to be a good option....not anymore as tuition has skyrocketed to astronomical levels.

The internet has transformed the way business is conducted.
You have to change with it.
Long are the days of the one source income earners.
The internet can turn anyone into a merchant. Multiple streams of income.

philosophy is questions that may never be answered
religion is answers that may never be questioned

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#16 : April 16, 2012, 09:36:42 PM



spartan

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#17 : April 16, 2012, 10:04:15 PM

IMHO in their attempts to make things fairer, safer and easier Govt actually make it harder, more expensive and less "fair."

Those at the top of the pile stay there, but those at the bottom and middle simply cannot overcome the obstacles placed in front of them so they cannot exceed. You get the odd Google, Oracle or Facebook rushing to the summit, but for the most part developing and expanding a small to medium business is next to impossible. The costs and regulations imposed on industry and business is such that it quite simply holds them back. We really are at a point where Govt, both State and Federal is governing for the sake of governing. Our own President espouses the opinion that the country is great only due to the role of it's Govt. Not only is that blatantly false but it is a recipe for disaster. Not saying there is no role for Govt, but when you think bureaucrats are the cream of the crop, it is not only a recipe for disaster, but what is it more likely to produce more of? Yup more bureaucrats. Think about that when you go to bed tonight!

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#18 : April 16, 2012, 10:26:23 PM

I don't know about the recipe for disaster - I think it is simply delaying the next success for the citizenry.  More and more folks are recognizing the over regulation - it will change. 

\"A Great Coach has to have a Patient Wife, A Loyal Dog, and a Great Quarterback. . . . but not necessarily in that order\" ~ Coach Bud Grant

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#19 : April 16, 2012, 10:26:30 PM

Workforce participation is at the lowest it's been in 30 years....since the recession of the 70s. And there is no indication it's going to improve anytime soon.

Wages are falling while costs of living continue to increase. The statistics show the gap between the rich and poor is widening and the middle class is shrinking.

These are not sustainable economic trends. The American dream is in serious jeopardy.

Education used to be a good option....not anymore as tuition has skyrocketed to astronomical levels.


It is a good option when your employer pays for you to go to school.    $1,500 for 1 class is stupid and that's on the low side because its an online university.  I would never pay that myself, I would rather just read the books myself and educate myself.  I don't need someone to grade my work for $1,500.

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#20 : April 16, 2012, 10:36:23 PM

All good pewtersurf - sounds like you're on the right track

Thanks Spartan, hope all is going well for you too.

Thanks Wreck

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#21 : April 16, 2012, 10:37:58 PM

20% of the country making over 90K a year - 17.8% over 100K - gotta say it can be done with 1 out of 5 folks making that kind of money - and they aren't all in Congress or the Executive Branch...

\"A Great Coach has to have a Patient Wife, A Loyal Dog, and a Great Quarterback. . . . but not necessarily in that order\" ~ Coach Bud Grant

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#22 : April 16, 2012, 11:59:01 PM

You can deny it all you want. But the fact is that times are changing. Like I said, the "American dream" is withering away. Generations of families are now moving in together to combine income in order to make ends meet.



LOS ANGELES (AP) -- It's a home within a home -- and it could be coming soon to a home near you.

Builders across the country are revamping home designs to meet the needs of a growing number of Americans who are now living with extended family.

The number of so-called multi-generational households -- where adults are living with their elderly parents or grown children -- has jumped since the Great Recession forced Americans to rethink living on their own. Demographic experts say it's poised to rise further as baby boomers age, so-called "boomerang kids" walloped by the weak job market stay home longer and ethnic groups such as Asians and Hispanics, who are more likely to live with extended family, continue to grow.

The housing industry is trying to keep up with the changes by adding self-contained suites to single-family homes from North Carolina to California to enable families to stay close while retaining a greater degree of independence.

"It's not the nuclear family, the American dream family that we see all the time," said Jerry Messman, a partner in national design firm BSB Design. "The builders are starting to respond to it."

After World War II, Americans were encouraged to move out of their parents' house when they reached adulthood and achieve independence at an earlier age. Over the next few decades, young families ventured out to live on their own, separately from their parents, in traditional single-family homes.

Since 1980, however, the number of families living in multi-generational households has steadily climbed, buoyed by a wave of immigration and delayed marriages. After the onset of the Great Recession, the number jumped even higher -- rising 10.5 percent in a two-year period so that nearly 17 percent of Americans lived in multi-generational households by 2009, according to a report by the Pew Research Center.

During the last year, builders and home designers have started to respond to the trend by rolling out layouts for single-family houses that include a semi-independent suite with a separate entry, bathroom and kitchenette. Some suites even include their own laundry areas and outdoor patios for additional privacy, though they maintain a connection to the main house through an inside door.

Reanna Cox, 33, bought a new home earlier this year in San Bernardino with a suite that connects to her kitchen through a hallway. Initially, Cox and her husband planned to have his aging parents live there. But when her sister lost her job, Cox invited her to move into the suite with her young daughter.

"It's somewhere they can live to get themselves back on their feet," said Cox, who moved to the tan, five bedroom house with caramel-colored shutters to shorten her daily commute.

Lennar Corp., based in Miami, is offering 3,400 square-foot homes that include a roughly 700 square-foot suite in Las Vegas. Standard Pacific Homes of Irvine is offering a self-contained "casita" attached to the main house as an option on its new designs.

Both companies say the plans have been popular since they were rolled out last year.

But it isn't clear what share of homebuyers will buy these homes -- especially since immigrant families from Asia and Latin America who have traditionally lived together have long found ways to do so without this option, said Gary Painter, research director at the University of Southern California's Lusk Center for Real Estate.

"There certainly is a demand to be close," Painter said. "We just don't have enough in the market to make a definitive statement about whether this sort of kitchenette living or guest house nearby will become a next wave."

But in higher-end markets, Painter said it's more likely such plans could prosper, including among well-to-do immigrant families.

New home sales have struggled as builders face competition from foreclosures and short sales. While sales of previously occupied homes have risen more than 13 percent since July, sales of U.S. new homes fell in February for the second straight month and remain well below levels that economists consider healthy.

Lennar is offering its so-called "Next Gen" designs in states ranging from California to Texas to Florida. Sales of these multi-generational homes account for a very small percentage of the company's sales but are growing quickly, said Jeff Roos, Lennar's western regional president.

Multi-generational homes are expected to account for roughly 30 to 40 percent of new homes in communities where the floor plans are being offered, Roos said.

The Aliso Viejo-based New Home Company is rolling out a range of options for multi-generational living in the affluent Orange County suburb of Irvine, where the Asian population has nearly doubled in the last decade.

The company's floor plans include a self-contained suite attached to a main house or separate homes that share a common yard and pool. The company has reached out to Asian buyers by offering touches such as specially designed wok kitchens and dedicated music rooms, but the homes are also drawing buyers from other ethnic backgrounds, said Joan Marcus-Colvin, the company's vice president of sales, marketing and design.

"Although extremely popular within the Asian culture, (multi-generational living) is also something a lot of other people are having to deal with," she said.

Jim Park, vice chair of the Asian Real Estate Association of America, said he thinks multigenerational designs are a smart move, especially in light of Asian Americans' preference for new construction and the community's rising purchasing power.

"In my experience, people do move toward home products that are going to meet their needs better," said Park, who owns a real estate firm in San Diego.

Builders say the tendency to live together longer comes down to a matter of economics as families of varied ethnic backgrounds cope with the wake of the recession and the needs of aging parents, who may have seen their retirement savings depleted in the downturn.

"We see so many families that are living like this," said Jeremy Parness, Lennar's division president in Las Vegas. "There's so many different reasons, all driven mostly by economics."

http://www.whas11.com/news/Multi-generational-households-a-growing-trend-in-weak-economy-147512805.html

wreck ship

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#23 : April 17, 2012, 12:04:55 AM

Workforce participation is at the lowest it's been in 30 years....since the recession of the 70s. And there is no indication it's going to improve anytime soon.

Wages are falling while costs of living continue to increase. The statistics show the gap between the rich and poor is widening and the middle class is shrinking.

These are not sustainable economic trends. The American dream is in serious jeopardy.

Education used to be a good option....not anymore as tuition has skyrocketed to astronomical levels.


It is a good option when your employer pays for you to go to school.    $1,500 for 1 class is stupid and that's on the low side because its an online university.  I would never pay that myself, I would rather just read the books myself and educate myself.  I don't need someone to grade my work for $1,500.
You don't need anyone to grade your work for you for any amount of money to prove your knowledge on the subject.

But if you want to expand your network of potential opportunity's, getting certified makes sense.

Consider MIT has an online open source program where you can study undergrad and graduate level courses for free. Yes. You can join a class and study and take exams for free! The kicker is the school can't recognize you as a student at the end of the semester so you get no grades. But considering the ample number of computer certifications courses they offer, you can learn for free and get certified from any number of comp cert companies. Not just computer programming but they offer over 2000 courses!

You can make over $60,000 doing computer customer service from home giving you the flexibility to conduct other businesses of your choosing, increasing your value.

Don't limit your self. Find certification programs that will allow you to work remotely with any company.
Challenge yourself, learn new things like art and music, pretend you are a wealthy businessman and you'll become one.

You're not doing it because you love to, you're doing it because it gives you the luxury of doing the things you love.

philosophy is questions that may never be answered
religion is answers that may never be questioned

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#24 : April 17, 2012, 12:06:21 AM

You take that as a bad thing - I don't.  And don't hang your opinions on WHAS - just mvho.

\"A Great Coach has to have a Patient Wife, A Loyal Dog, and a Great Quarterback. . . . but not necessarily in that order\" ~ Coach Bud Grant

wreck ship

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#25 : April 17, 2012, 12:06:55 AM

You can deny it all you want. But the fact is that times are changing. Like I said, the "American dream" is withering away. Generations of families are now moving in together to combine income in order to make ends meet.



LOS ANGELES (AP) -- It's a home within a home -- and it could be coming soon to a home near you.

Builders across the country are revamping home designs to meet the needs of a growing number of Americans who are now living with extended family.

The number of so-called multi-generational households -- where adults are living with their elderly parents or grown children -- has jumped since the Great Recession forced Americans to rethink living on their own. Demographic experts say it's poised to rise further as baby boomers age, so-called "boomerang kids" walloped by the weak job market stay home longer and ethnic groups such as Asians and Hispanics, who are more likely to live with extended family, continue to grow.

The housing industry is trying to keep up with the changes by adding self-contained suites to single-family homes from North Carolina to California to enable families to stay close while retaining a greater degree of independence.

"It's not the nuclear family, the American dream family that we see all the time," said Jerry Messman, a partner in national design firm BSB Design. "The builders are starting to respond to it."

After World War II, Americans were encouraged to move out of their parents' house when they reached adulthood and achieve independence at an earlier age. Over the next few decades, young families ventured out to live on their own, separately from their parents, in traditional single-family homes.

Since 1980, however, the number of families living in multi-generational households has steadily climbed, buoyed by a wave of immigration and delayed marriages. After the onset of the Great Recession, the number jumped even higher -- rising 10.5 percent in a two-year period so that nearly 17 percent of Americans lived in multi-generational households by 2009, according to a report by the Pew Research Center.

During the last year, builders and home designers have started to respond to the trend by rolling out layouts for single-family houses that include a semi-independent suite with a separate entry, bathroom and kitchenette. Some suites even include their own laundry areas and outdoor patios for additional privacy, though they maintain a connection to the main house through an inside door.

Reanna Cox, 33, bought a new home earlier this year in San Bernardino with a suite that connects to her kitchen through a hallway. Initially, Cox and her husband planned to have his aging parents live there. But when her sister lost her job, Cox invited her to move into the suite with her young daughter.

"It's somewhere they can live to get themselves back on their feet," said Cox, who moved to the tan, five bedroom house with caramel-colored shutters to shorten her daily commute.

Lennar Corp., based in Miami, is offering 3,400 square-foot homes that include a roughly 700 square-foot suite in Las Vegas. Standard Pacific Homes of Irvine is offering a self-contained "casita" attached to the main house as an option on its new designs.

Both companies say the plans have been popular since they were rolled out last year.

But it isn't clear what share of homebuyers will buy these homes -- especially since immigrant families from Asia and Latin America who have traditionally lived together have long found ways to do so without this option, said Gary Painter, research director at the University of Southern California's Lusk Center for Real Estate.

"There certainly is a demand to be close," Painter said. "We just don't have enough in the market to make a definitive statement about whether this sort of kitchenette living or guest house nearby will become a next wave."

But in higher-end markets, Painter said it's more likely such plans could prosper, including among well-to-do immigrant families.

New home sales have struggled as builders face competition from foreclosures and short sales. While sales of previously occupied homes have risen more than 13 percent since July, sales of U.S. new homes fell in February for the second straight month and remain well below levels that economists consider healthy.

Lennar is offering its so-called "Next Gen" designs in states ranging from California to Texas to Florida. Sales of these multi-generational homes account for a very small percentage of the company's sales but are growing quickly, said Jeff Roos, Lennar's western regional president.

Multi-generational homes are expected to account for roughly 30 to 40 percent of new homes in communities where the floor plans are being offered, Roos said.

The Aliso Viejo-based New Home Company is rolling out a range of options for multi-generational living in the affluent Orange County suburb of Irvine, where the Asian population has nearly doubled in the last decade.

The company's floor plans include a self-contained suite attached to a main house or separate homes that share a common yard and pool. The company has reached out to Asian buyers by offering touches such as specially designed wok kitchens and dedicated music rooms, but the homes are also drawing buyers from other ethnic backgrounds, said Joan Marcus-Colvin, the company's vice president of sales, marketing and design.

"Although extremely popular within the Asian culture, (multi-generational living) is also something a lot of other people are having to deal with," she said.

Jim Park, vice chair of the Asian Real Estate Association of America, said he thinks multigenerational designs are a smart move, especially in light of Asian Americans' preference for new construction and the community's rising purchasing power.

"In my experience, people do move toward home products that are going to meet their needs better," said Park, who owns a real estate firm in San Diego.

Builders say the tendency to live together longer comes down to a matter of economics as families of varied ethnic backgrounds cope with the wake of the recession and the needs of aging parents, who may have seen their retirement savings depleted in the downturn.

"We see so many families that are living like this," said Jeremy Parness, Lennar's division president in Las Vegas. "There's so many different reasons, all driven mostly by economics."

http://www.whas11.com/news/Multi-generational-households-a-growing-trend-in-weak-economy-147512805.html
I don't see this as a bad thing.

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religion is answers that may never be questioned

Chief Joseph

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#26 : April 17, 2012, 10:14:02 AM


A system designed to insure the right of citizens to petition their government has evolved into a system of lobbyists, granting access mainly to those who can most afford it. This entrenches the wealthy at the top and inhibits change.

Illuminator is a good poster. He sticks to his guns and makes good points. Some don\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\'t like that.

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#27 : April 17, 2012, 02:08:08 PM

business must be your religion if you want to be in the 1%. you gotta eat it, you gotta sleep it, you gotta breathe it. You must get up earlier and stay later than your competition. you must think of how to improve your business constantly...and never ever allow for failure. You must overcome and succeed against all odds! It IS the NEW RELIGION of SECULAR AMERICA!

LADIES and GENTLEMEN I PRESENT TO YOU... .... ... the american dream.

I actually agree with you here....Wow, I'm amazed.

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#28 : April 17, 2012, 02:13:08 PM

the root of all evil - the LOVE of money.

Damn, that didn't take long.

I think the love of money is the root of all unhappiness. I idea that we're aren't happy unless we have a bigger house, better car or newest Iphone is the root of all unhappiness. How many people bankrupt themselves and familes, or go into big time debt for materalistic things that cannot make them happy yet the debt from those things crushes their lives.

Just silly. My personal objective is life is to enjoy the simply things in life.  A cold beer on a hot day. The satisfaction of completing projects around my house. Being active outside. And most importantly, do not be a slave to my bills. Count how many hours a week  you work to pay your bills, loans, debts, etc....You quickly see you are not working for yourself but for your debt. Keep your bills as low as possible, work more for yourself and not as much for your iphone. Save more, retire earlier and be happy.

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#29 : April 19, 2012, 09:02:31 AM

No matter how far wealth inequality reaches in this country, there will be those that simply claim it's just that people don't work hard anymore rather than acknowledging that the deck is stacked in the favor of some above others. American work ethic hasn't changed, but America has, and not for the better. Still waiting on trickle down economics to...you know...trickle down.

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