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wreck ship

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#15 : May 05, 2012, 01:33:18 PM

Can you afford to take a slow approach? That is, buy it and do a little work on it every year with the idea that it will be ready to go when the kids move out.

Also there are things you can do to bring in a little income in the mean time like lease out the timber rights (you said heavily wooded) to a lumber co. You won't get rich but you could cover some of the prop. taxes and insurance.
That would be the most likely approach. Although my goal would be to get the house move in ready and then just make the move within the next yr.
The good thing is the property is in "lumber country" where wood company's are always looking to buy more wood and the property neighbor is a company that grows pine for scientific research. The owner said he has permission to collect as much fallen pines needles as he can. He said he never did but that is a money maker in itself.
I slept on it last night and am feeling good about it. I'm still doin my research as I've given myself untl monday to decide. Thanks.

philosophy is questions that may never be answered
religion is answers that may never be questioned

wreck ship

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#16 : May 05, 2012, 01:43:31 PM


If you can afford to purchase this property and not develop it, then by all means go for it.
So you suggest I buy it and put off developing it until I can afford to?


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#17 : May 05, 2012, 03:00:07 PM




Off the top of my head I believe the septic is fairly new, maybe 5, 6 yrs old.
I have a little experience in farming. My first job was a farm hand and I helped take care of horses. I used to ride, now I just ride motorcycles.lol
As for money, lets just say getting the house powered would be the only big investment I would make. Everything else I would start small and work up. Luckily me and the wife work out of our home, although we would sacrifice some income while I experience the trial and errors of farming. I've told my family and one of my brothers said he would move his family down in a heart beat.lol. Definately encouraging.
It has been zoned and it doesn't require building permits and clearing the land would bring me extra income as the owner has recently sold about an acre worth of poplar trees.
The property has been reduced to 30 acres from over 200 since 1900. The 30 acres we're talking about was crop farmed until around the 70's. Mostly cotton but crops and herding for family consumption was done.
There is a rundown smoke shed where they smoked meats and an old boiler room where they boiled sugar cane and made syrup.

I wouldn't approach this as an investment. I would like to farm for self sufficency and the lifestyle but I kind of like the secluded location enough to retire there some day.
Who knows, I may like farming enough to make a day job out of it. My brothers excitement has me excited even more. Need more buzz kill.

Contrary to popular belief, you've got one life to live. That's it. I say go for it. It's better to try and fail than to regret it 30 years from now. First thing you need to do is get a subscription to Mother Earth News. They offer a DVD collection that will help you with everything you need to know about living off the grid, and references to anything they don't cover. Work on improving the property. Property values will rebound in the future. If you decide the lifestyle is not for you, at least you will get a return on your investment. Go for it. One tip: go diesel in everything you can. Farmers aren't taxed on their fuel. Get your own tank or have it delivered in 55 gallon drums. Also dish systems mean you don't need cable for tv or computers. Good luck.

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#18 : May 05, 2012, 03:16:11 PM

Can you afford to take a slow approach? That is, buy it and do a little work on it every year with the idea that it will be ready to go when the kids move out.

Also there are things you can do to bring in a little income in the mean time like lease out the timber rights (you said heavily wooded) to a lumber co. You won't get rich but you could cover some of the prop. taxes and insurance.
That would be the most likely approach. Although my goal would be to get the house move in ready and then just make the move within the next yr.
The good thing is the property is in "lumber country" where wood company's are always looking to buy more wood and the property neighbor is a company that grows pine for scientific research. The owner said he has permission to collect as much fallen pines needles as he can. He said he never did but that is a money maker in itself.
I slept on it last night and am feeling good about it. I'm still doin my research as I've given myself untl monday to decide. Thanks.

curious, does Uncle Sam (or state gov't) get any annual taxes from the real estate? if so, how much?

Every real estate owner pays Property tax to the County (and State in some cases).

The Fed gets money from any development of the land in the form of Environmental Impact Fees and of course if any income is derived from the land


dbucfan

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#19 : May 05, 2012, 03:41:13 PM

What popular belief offers there is more than one life to live?  Damn - I gotta stop onto this board more frequently.  John Galt?, I would have thought I would have received a PM from you...

\"A Great Coach has to have a Patient Wife, A Loyal Dog, and a Great Quarterback. . . . but not necessarily in that order\" ~ Coach Bud Grant

wreck ship

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#20 : May 05, 2012, 04:02:41 PM

whats the infatuation with "living off the land" lifestyle? dissatisfied with contemporary life?
Not dissatisfied with contemporary life, I like options. Changing lifestyles doesn't mean I become a hermit and never go to the city.
What appeals to me is growing my own food, an appreciation for nature, and a work ethic I'm not getting logging hours for others.

And what is contemporary life? Working 8 hrs and then plopping in front of a t.v. or computer, or both?

Contemporary life is not living like our great, great grandparents lived in the 19th century or during the great depression.  You can live the spartan/puritanical life without having to go into the woods to do it.

Want to instill some values in your children, take them here....

http://farmcamp2011.blogspot.com/
I'm not considering this to fullfill some midlife crisis or discipline my kids. I'm attracted to the lifestyle and I've always planned to retire on a farm. The thing is, the offer is too good to pass up. I wasn't planning on making a move like this right now but here it is in my lap and I have to decide.
I'm 60/40 on wanting to do this. I'm trying to gauge where my brother is on this. He's a true outdoorsman and wants to do it but his wife is not feeling it. Ugghhhh...I think I'm at 50/50 now.

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olafberserker

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#21 : May 05, 2012, 04:13:39 PM

Been gone for awhile..... wreck ship = chrispy?

wreck ship

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#22 : May 05, 2012, 04:27:40 PM

Can you afford to take a slow approach? That is, buy it and do a little work on it every year with the idea that it will be ready to go when the kids move out.

Also there are things you can do to bring in a little income in the mean time like lease out the timber rights (you said heavily wooded) to a lumber co. You won't get rich but you could cover some of the prop. taxes and insurance.
That would be the most likely approach. Although my goal would be to get the house move in ready and then just make the move within the next yr.
The good thing is the property is in "lumber country" where wood company's are always looking to buy more wood and the property neighbor is a company that grows pine for scientific research. The owner said he has permission to collect as much fallen pines needles as he can. He said he never did but that is a money maker in itself.
I slept on it last night and am feeling good about it. I'm still doin my research as I've given myself untl monday to decide. Thanks.

curious, does Uncle Sam (or state gov't) get any annual taxes from the real estate? if so, how much?
4700 a yr. If I purchase the property, I would get a liscense to operate a juvenile wilderness program and get the full tax exemption. I would have to open up an acre for community service on the weekends.

philosophy is questions that may never be answered
religion is answers that may never be questioned

wreck ship

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#23 : May 05, 2012, 04:30:30 PM




Off the top of my head I believe the septic is fairly new, maybe 5, 6 yrs old.
I have a little experience in farming. My first job was a farm hand and I helped take care of horses. I used to ride, now I just ride motorcycles.lol
As for money, lets just say getting the house powered would be the only big investment I would make. Everything else I would start small and work up. Luckily me and the wife work out of our home, although we would sacrifice some income while I experience the trial and errors of farming. I've told my family and one of my brothers said he would move his family down in a heart beat.lol. Definately encouraging.
It has been zoned and it doesn't require building permits and clearing the land would bring me extra income as the owner has recently sold about an acre worth of poplar trees.
The property has been reduced to 30 acres from over 200 since 1900. The 30 acres we're talking about was crop farmed until around the 70's. Mostly cotton but crops and herding for family consumption was done.
There is a rundown smoke shed where they smoked meats and an old boiler room where they boiled sugar cane and made syrup.

I wouldn't approach this as an investment. I would like to farm for self sufficency and the lifestyle but I kind of like the secluded location enough to retire there some day.
Who knows, I may like farming enough to make a day job out of it. My brothers excitement has me excited even more. Need more buzz kill.

Contrary to popular belief, you've got one life to live. That's it. I say go for it. It's better to try and fail than to regret it 30 years from now. First thing you need to do is get a subscription to Mother Earth News. They offer a DVD collection that will help you with everything you need to know about living off the grid, and references to anything they don't cover. Work on improving the property. Property values will rebound in the future. If you decide the lifestyle is not for you, at least you will get a return on your investment. Go for it. One tip: go diesel in everything you can. Farmers aren't taxed on their fuel. Get your own tank or have it delivered in 55 gallon drums. Also dish systems mean you don't need cable for tv or computers. Good luck.
Thanks bro! You got me stoked all over again.
I'm doing research on juvenile wilderness programs and am liking the idea more and more. Kids needing to complete community service hours + property work needing to be done = win win!

philosophy is questions that may never be answered
religion is answers that may never be questioned

wreck ship

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#24 : May 05, 2012, 04:31:30 PM

Been gone for awhile..... wreck ship = chrispy?
chrispy??? ???

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Chief Joseph

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#25 : May 05, 2012, 05:09:06 PM


You should also check out state energy programs. Here in Wyoming they will subsidize both solar and wind programs.

Illuminator is a good poster. He sticks to his guns and makes good points. Some don\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\'t like that.

wreck ship

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#26 : May 05, 2012, 05:26:18 PM


You should also check out state energy programs. Here in Wyoming they will subsidize both solar and wind programs.
Been there, doin that! Thanks

I'm looking into juvenile programs and I'm just taken back at what the govt pays out to people who run programs on their property. It won't make you rich but it covers whatever cost of living the property owner may have plus some. And it's right up my alley.

philosophy is questions that may never be answered
religion is answers that may never be questioned

wreck ship

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#27 : May 05, 2012, 05:48:26 PM

Definitely not Chrispy. Wreck is a normal person.

Good luck w/ your decision.  I only meant to joke with you regading the contemporary living. I lived in Idaho for a couple of years and recall all kinds of stories of individuals who were fed up with socieity and bought land, guns, and became isolated from society: didn't want to be bothered by anyone.(mostly the state and Fed gov't). I always thought they were squirrely people.

Good luck with your decision.
lol. I don't even want to know who this chrispy character is.

I do know what you mean by the isolationist. The locals who live around the property fit the discription to the T.
Gun toters who hate the govt.
That's also making me hesitant. 

philosophy is questions that may never be answered
religion is answers that may never be questioned

John Galt?

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#28 : May 05, 2012, 07:34:03 PM

What popular belief offers there is more than one life to live?

Scientology


  Damn - I gotta stop onto this board more frequently.  John Galt?, I would have thought I would have received a PM from you...

Did not know the PMs worked


dbucfan

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#29 : May 05, 2012, 07:43:01 PM

L. Ron's invention qualifies doesn't it.. guess I still can't get it to the status of being a religion, and yea - pm's work, however that part was in jest..

\"A Great Coach has to have a Patient Wife, A Loyal Dog, and a Great Quarterback. . . . but not necessarily in that order\" ~ Coach Bud Grant
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