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michael89156

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: May 29, 2012, 06:42:56 PM

MAY 28, 2012


Is Schiano on the correct side of the heat argument?



For as long as the Buccaneers have played in Tampa Bay, they've had to find a way to beat the heat.
 
Temperatures routinely hover in the mid-90's in August during training camp and September during the first month of the regular season. In fact, the average temperature in Oct. is 84 degrees, and with humidity, it can feel much, much warmer than that.
 
Some Bucs coaches have ignored it. Some have embraced it. Others have try to discover the best way to conquer it.
 
Coach Greg Schiano wants to use it as a weapon against opposing teams.
 
That's only part of the reason Schiano has his team operating at a heightened tempo in practice with no wasted moments or motion. One day a few weeks ago, he made players return to their positions on the field because he wasn't pleased how they sprinted to the sidelines for a water break.
 
"That has to become our advantage,'' Schiano said of the heat. "When you get teams out there in that stadium and it's really hot and you push the envelope, I think it becomes an advantage and that's something that is important to me.''
 
Schiano coached for two seasons at the University of Miami, so it's not as if he hasn't watched teams handle the heat. That said, historically, the Bucs have been all over the map with this heat issue. Before the Collective Bargaining Agreement prevented it, coach Ray Perkins held three-a-days during training camp. His teams traditionally started quickly, especially relative to their final record. Perkins' Bucs began 2-3 (4-11) in '87, 2-3 in '88 (5-11), 3-2 (5-11) in '89, 4-2 (6-10) in '90. But they wilted my early October.
 
As far back as 2001 under Tony Dungy, the Bucs followed research on dehydration and exercise in the heat done in conjunction with scientists from the Gatorade Sports Science Institute. Jon Gruden added an air-conditioned 'cool-down' trailer when the team trained at Disney's Wide World of Sports. Raheem Morris included it in the team's new set up at One Buc Place in 2009. In fact, beginning in 2010, Morris routinely had his teams practice one day a week indoors at Tropicana Field when possible during September.
 
How much of an advantage is the heat in Tampa Bay to the Bucs?
 
That's hard to quantify. The more talented team that plays the best on any given Sunday usually wins regardless of weather conditions.
 
But a well-hydrated team that has practiced in cooler temperatures during the week may be better prepared to handle the heat for three hours than one that loses fluids practicing in it every day. That's just what the science would seem to indicate.
 
There's no question Schiano's team is going to be well-conditioned. The up-tempo practices almost guarantee it. Presumably, that could be an edge.
 
But Schiano has to be careful not to have players leave their best performance on the practice field before Sunday.
.



Posted by Rick Stroud at 5:09:22 pm on May 28, 2012

Morgan

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#1 : May 29, 2012, 06:48:48 PM

Roy Cummings is saying that they probably won't be practicing in the Trop ,,,,,,,,,,,,So important, the Bucs can probably say goodbye to those once-a-week trips to climate-controlled Tropicana Field they made under Morris to escape the heat. As long as Schiano is in charge, the heat will be on and it will likely be on high.
http://www2.tbo.com/sports/bucs/2012/may/25/1/bucs-turning-up-the-heat-in-conditioning-ar-408455/

anterrabae33

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#2 : May 29, 2012, 06:58:03 PM

What's the point of playing home games in the heat if you aren't going to be ready for the games? That was very obvious during Raheem's tenure. I swear, the other teams were better conditioned for the heat than we were.

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#3 : May 29, 2012, 07:25:43 PM

I was born in Lakeland and moved back and forth between North and South several times. I can tell you that every time that I returned to FL the heat just overwhelmed me the first week or two. I always felt like it was a struggle just to breathe. But working outside in it, I always acclimated in time. I'll always be convinced that it's a big advantage if we use it right.  And, I always felt like going from AC to heat just made me want to wilt. I'd rather be in it continuosly and be acclimated to it.

Feel Real Good

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#4 : May 29, 2012, 07:29:55 PM

I forget the exact numbers, but someone recently posted that the Bucs are basically .500 in September games going back to at least the Dungy days. The entire league gets most of their players from Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, and California. Almost every player on every team knows how to play in heat. Let's worry more about being stronger, faster, and better coached.

FRG is the most logical poster on this board.  You guys just don\'t like where the logical conclusions take you.

The Anti-Java

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#5 : May 29, 2012, 07:35:55 PM

I always thought they should of put a retractable roof on RJS.  Better for players and fans alike.
: May 29, 2012, 08:25:54 PM The Anti-Java



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#6 : May 29, 2012, 08:12:11 PM

I don't think the heat is an advantage for anyone. I think extreme heat takes it's toll on everyone. Being use to it doesn't mean you won't dehydrate and cramp just like the guy from up north. These guys are all great athletes in excellent condition. I just don't think it helps or hurts us anymore than the other team. Retractable roof would be great for the players and the fans.


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#7 : May 29, 2012, 08:20:34 PM

Respectfully Jdub, I think you're wrong. The extreme heat does affect everyone but when you come out of the cool north air and hit that heat and humidity, it blows your mind. I definitely think it's an advantage if we use it right.

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#8 : May 29, 2012, 08:24:14 PM

as long as Schiano doesn't drive the team into the ground by over-doing practice in the middle of the day heat....there's no advantage if their legs are dead after being in the heat all week before Sunday.

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#9 : May 29, 2012, 08:49:18 PM

These days, by the time the summer rolls along, no problem.

When I was dating my wife and lived in the UK? I used to walk out of the airport and get smacked in the face with a sledgehammer of heat and humidity. It was overwhelming almost. In those first few days if I so much as thought about physical exercise I broke into a profuse sweat. It has to be an advantage if brought along correctly and intelligently.

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#10 : May 29, 2012, 09:32:19 PM

I don't think the heat is an advantage for anyone. I think extreme heat takes it's toll on everyone. Being use to it doesn't mean you won't dehydrate and cramp just like the guy from up north. These guys are all great athletes in excellent condition. I just don't think it helps or hurts us anymore than the other team. Retractable roof would be great for the players and the fans.

Working in the heat is just bad. The idea that you "get used to it" is a myth.  The Cowboys tried the death march in Witchita Falls one year to be acclimated to the heat and really all they did was burn out the team and exhaust them. Jock a-holes like to think this is toughening you up or some other nonsense but there is no science to support the idea that practicing in heat helps you beat the heat.

All posts are opinions in case you are too stupid to figure that out on your own without me saying it over and over.

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#11 : May 29, 2012, 09:47:12 PM

I forget the exact numbers, but someone recently posted that the Bucs are basically .500 in September games going back to at least the Dungy days. The entire league gets most of their players from Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, and California. Almost every player on every team knows how to play in heat. Let's worry more about being stronger, faster, and better coached.

That was me. Since 1998, in day September home games the Bucs are 10-11. But in the second halves of those games the Bucs have outscored their opponents 207-155.

BucBalla85

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#12 : May 29, 2012, 10:15:31 PM

His first go around with this. I'm sure he can figure out what works and what's too much in this heat.

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#13 : May 29, 2012, 10:26:18 PM

SSI backs the idea that a well-hydrated team will fair better than a team that routinely practices AND plays in it.

But it's only "suggested", indicating that the hard evidence isn't really there.

Ask anyone who's played ball in Florida in July, August, and September...  Heat matters.  Heat counts.

But like someone said previously...  It sucks for ALL players.  Not just the visiting team.  But...

IF the team commits to the run.  Truly commits - not just "sayings"...  It WILL wear on teams.

It's NOT the physical wear though.  It's the psychological effect.  It's been talked about every year, by every team coming into Tampa...  and they DO come in physically prepared and fully hydrated.

But it's the first time.......  The first time an opponent let's the word "heat" creep into their heads...  Advantage.

The advantage may be ever-so-slight, but it IS just that...  an advantage.


JDouble

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#14 : May 29, 2012, 10:26:44 PM

I don't think the heat is an advantage for anyone. I think extreme heat takes it's toll on everyone. Being use to it doesn't mean you won't dehydrate and cramp just like the guy from up north. These guys are all great athletes in excellent condition. I just don't think it helps or hurts us anymore than the other team. Retractable roof would be great for the players and the fans.

Working in the heat is just bad. The idea that you "get used to it" is a myth.  The Cowboys tried the death march in Witchita Falls one year to be acclimated to the heat and really all they did was burn out the team and exhaust them. Jock a-holes like to think this is toughening you up or some other nonsense but there is no science to support the idea that practicing in heat helps you beat the heat.

I think you do "get use to it" mentally, but physically it still takes the same toll on your body no matter how long you have been in/around it. To me, practicing all week in it is a disadvantage and leaves us a bit worn out on Sunday. I think teams that practice in A/C or in cooler climates all week come here and have the advantage because they are better rested and hydrated. It's really about mental toughness, and NFL players travel so much they are all use to playing in hot climates. If I was head coach I would practice inside the Trop as much as possible so my guys are ready to go on Sunday instead of drained.

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