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JDouble

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« #15 : August 26, 2012, 09:20:56 AM »

I see a lot of Bellichek and Parcells comparisons, but honestly he reminds me very much of Bill Cowher.


10lbbass

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« #16 : August 26, 2012, 10:06:03 AM »

I see Cowher and Tomlin as well - all business. You can do a lot worse than modeling your coaches after those of the Steelers. There is just a sensibility about him that is refreshing.  Obviously the proof is in the pudding.  Not sure we have had anyone like him before. 

The Franchi5e

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« #17 : August 26, 2012, 11:00:05 AM »

I still have an image of Raheem's confused, lost face on the sidelines. Thank god he's not representing the organization anymore. Schiano seems like he belongs the same way that Harbaugh made his presence felt last year.

Skull and Bones

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« #18 : August 26, 2012, 11:04:10 AM »

I see a lot of Bellichek and Parcells comparisons, but honestly he reminds me very much of Bill Cowher.
  maybe their jaw lines


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« #19 : August 26, 2012, 01:17:46 PM »

I love Schiano. It took a bunch of hope and a lot of optimism to support Raheem, but with Schiano it's easy. It really does feel like he is legit. I will be surprised if he isn't very successful in the NFL. SOOOOOOO glad we ended up with him and not Chip!

+1

Agree on Cowher comparison too.

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« #20 : August 26, 2012, 01:33:25 PM »

I liked his play calling with the Pats....And all of the above that you guys said.  Seems like we lucked out with this guy.  The aspect of him I like the most is his apparent genuiness and being so down to earth.
Seems like a real guy who comfortable in his own skin....like very much!


NotDeadYet

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« #21 : August 26, 2012, 05:05:19 PM »

      Some good points!
      I have refrained from comparing Coach Schiano with Vince Lombardi as Schiano has yet to Coach a regular season game, but the physical resemblance is remarkable. Both are perceived by many as "disciplinarians", but were/are really very genuine people, doing everything possible to get the very best out of each player, treating them as individuals and with respect, and expecting it in return. Their football team was like an extended family. We need look no farther than Eric LeGrand to see the genuineness of Greg Schiano...
     http://www.profootballhof.com/hof/member.aspx?player_id=132

     And both became HC's in the NFL about the same age; Lombardi at 45, Schiano at 46.

    In listening to John Lynch's broadcast, Schiano wasn't calling the plays; Mike Sullivan was. Schiano has input at any time, though. And defensively, Bill Sheridan was up in the booth, with Bryan Cox down on the sideline, relaying the plays in. Kinda like that arrangement; if Bryan Cox can't get a player fired up, there's no hope for him ;D

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« #22 : August 26, 2012, 07:00:02 PM »

      Some good points!
      I have refrained from comparing Coach Schiano with Vince Lombardi as Schiano has yet to Coach a regular season game, but the physical resemblance is remarkable. Both are perceived by many as "disciplinarians", but were/are really very genuine people, doing everything possible to get the very best out of each player, treating them as individuals and with respect, and expecting it in return. Their football team was like an extended family. We need look no farther than Eric LeGrand to see the genuineness of Greg Schiano...
     http://www.profootballhof.com/hof/member.aspx?player_id=132

     And both became HC's in the NFL about the same age; Lombardi at 45, Schiano at 46.

    In listening to John Lynch's broadcast, Schiano wasn't calling the plays; Mike Sullivan was. Schiano has input at any time, though. And defensively, Bill Sheridan was up in the booth, with Bryan Cox down on the sideline, relaying the plays in. Kinda like that arrangement; if Bryan Cox can't get a player fired up, there's no hope for him ;D

My comparison obviously was not based on win loss record. It's more of an attitude, even a trait of the culture of Jersey. I clearly remember Lombardi, but It's not just appearance, it's personality. This man is focused and dedicated. It's not just talk for him. He respects the game and everyone involved with it. Most of my view has to do with Rutgers. I live about an hour west of there. He didn't revive just a team or a school or even a community. He revived a whole region. I've become a little more familiar with him since he joined the Bucs and he has done nothing disappointing to me. I did wonder if he acted hastily with Price, but I have to believe there was more to that story that wasn't revealed. To me, Schiano is just what the franchise and central Florida needs. A winning team will help the economy. I believe it will happen.

STULAAKE

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« #23 : August 26, 2012, 07:06:17 PM »

If Schiano wins, the Jimmy Johnson comparisons may be thrown out, if he loses he may be touted as the next Ray Perkins

You must be accountable for your actions!

NotDeadYet

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« #24 : August 26, 2012, 07:26:57 PM »

   Totally agree, 1sparky. Both Lombardi and Schiano seem(ed) to ooze leadership and the organizational, character and talent evaluation skills to create a solid football program. Lombardi got the Packer players attention right away with his line  "I have never been on a losing team, gentlemen, and I do not intend to start now!" The Packers improved from 1-10-1 in 1958 to 7-5 in 1959.

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« #25 : August 26, 2012, 10:56:58 PM »

Football was a part time job in Lombardi's day. It was also chalkboard and notepad. Sports medicine was pathetic. The league and many of the players were half the size they are today. Schiano has a tougher row to hoe. I seriously doubt the Bucs will dominate the league like Lombardi's Packers did, maybe just the division, but even that might be asking too much. I do expect a team that is competitive year after year though. His teams will overcome injuries and win the majority of their games. His teams will never quit on him like they did on Morris. He won't quit on them either. I'm sure they know that already. Neither will I. I've been a fan since the very beginning, and I'm NotDeadYet.

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« #26 : August 27, 2012, 12:00:34 AM »

From NFL.com: http://blogs.nfl.com/2012/08/26/nine-really-random-things-and-whatever-else-is-going-on-around-the-nfl-13/?module=HP11_content_stream

"I’ve made no secret about how much I think of Buccaneers coach Greg Schiano. I think he’s going to really improve that franchise, really teach them how to win, and I think he’ll do it quickly. And this week, while the Patriots and Bucs held joint practice, we got to hear one more reason why. Example A1 is Devin McCourty, the Patriots Pro Bowl corner who went to Rutgers under Schiano. He got to reunite with his old coach, and when asked about why Schiano will be successful in the NFL, McCourty explained. “I wasn’t a guy that had any other offers, I only had Rutgers,” McCourty said. “Even with that being said, he was always trying to change the program around with the right things and was all about winning and being competitive.” Rutgers, a place that’s impossible to recruit to, has a ton of guys like McCourty. Unrecruited, undersized, fairly raw… and they become NFL players. I can’t imagine a school with their lack of cache turning out so many late-rounders and free agents who stick on rosters. Schiano just taught them how to play. “He (ran) things like an NFL team,” McCourty said. “When I got to the NFL I was like, ‘You know, he was right.’ ” All of this bodes well for the Bucs this year. The fact that they cleaned out some riff-raff in the locker room helps, too. Because Schiano isn’t for everyone. But if you want to learn, he’ll teach you." 




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« #27 : August 27, 2012, 12:32:51 AM »

I think he's gonna have this team ready to play every week unlike Morris. I don't expect any slow starts either. I think this guy sticks around for a while.

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« #28 : August 27, 2012, 10:51:08 AM »

From the Boston Globe: http://articles.boston.com/2012-08-26/sports/33379272_1_buccaneers-greg-schiano-raheem-morris


Greg Schiano and Buccaneers are a perfect fit.


As Greg Schiano sits at a wrought iron patio table overlooking the practice fields behind One Buc Place in Tampa, he is remarkably relaxed.

You’d think, at 46 years old and after 11 seasons as a head coach on the college level at Rutgers, Schiano might be a little bit more anxious, constantly wondering, “Am I doing the right things? Am I missing anything?”

No, he is as in control of things with the Buccaneers as he ever was in Piscataway, N.J.

That’s likely because the fit between the ever-detailed, maniacally disciplined, and flat-lined Schiano, and the young and talented Buccaneers couldn’t be more perfect.

And that’s probably why Schiano, after several flirtations with the NFL, finally took the leap with this job and at this time.

“I thought as I learned about this organization, it was the right fit,” Schiano said. “But it’s not why I went down the road initially. I do, however, think that’s what kept me going down the road.

“A lot of times I’ve gone down the road and then said, ‘Rutgers is where I need to be, Rutgers is still right.’

“This was the first thing as I went down the road, and as I kept going, I said, ‘You know, this is where I should be. This is a good fit for me right now in my life.’

“I think one of the things that was very appealing was they had some young, talented players but probably lacking some of the things that we could bring as far as structure and discipline as well. So I did think it was a good opportunity and I think meeting with ownership and their belief and how they wanted to do things, that’s where it felt like we were aligned.”

Under ex-coach Raheem Morris, the Bucs were a mess last season, going 4-12 and losing their final 10 games, often by lopsided scores. They were undisciplined and lacked focus.

That’s why Schiano’s entrance should provide a big Year 1 bounce. A tighter ship should produce better results — and already has in the minds of players.

“His focus and his vision is just different,” said defensive tackle Gerald McCoy, the third overall pick in 2010. “The way he locks into things and his attention to detail, and he doesn’t let anybody . . . there’s a straight line, and if you’re not on it, you’re going to make sure you get back on it.

“And nobody, don’t matter who you are, he’s not going to let you get off that line. And if you’re not on the line, you’re going to have issues.

“I believe he has the right vision, and everybody’s buying into that vision and I believe we have all the pieces to be on the same level as the Patriots.”

Whether Schiano can sustain success after the initial post-hiring bump will be interesting to watch.

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Most coaches coming from the college ranks have struggled to enjoy success in the NFL, though Jim Harbaugh provided hope with a 13-3 record last season with the 49ers after jumping from Stanford.

But Schiano was a three-year NFL assistant with the Bears under mentor Dave Wannstedt from 1996-98. And he has two consiglieres in former Browns coach Butch Davis and well-respected veteran offensive assistant Jimmy Raye to help him navigate the weeds.

“In my opinion what I think is acceptable, it might not be . . . and NFL guys might say, what the heck?” Schiano said. “I just kind of bounce everything off those guys. At the end of the day, I’m going to do what I think is best, but I really do appreciate their opinion.”

His coaching staff is an interesting mix of coordinators — Bill Sheridan (defense), MikeSullivan (offense), Bob Ligashesky (special teams) — a few positional coaches from the pro ranks, and nine assistants who are coming straight from college.

“I think it’s half and half by design,” he said. “We have a lot of younger college coaches that are used to that [young group of players], and I think the leadership positions, especially, are all NFL guys.”

What will ultimately decide whether Schiano is a long-term NFL success is disproving some of his weaknesses that showed at Rutgers.

Schiano is a conservative game coach who believes running the football, defense, and special teams are the backbone of the team.

That did not work for Dave “It’s not a sin to punt” Wannstedt with the Dolphins — and that was almost a decade ago. Can smash-mouth football win big in today’s offense-first NFL?

“I think you can, but I think offense is very important as well,” Schiano said. “What I want to do on offense, I think we have a deep-shot quarterback [ Josh Freeman]. We have to make sure we take those shots.

“So we’re going to push the ball down the field and we’re going to throw the ball, we’re going to do all that. I just do believe it hardens your whole football team if you’re running the ball. It makes you a tougher bunch.”

Will Schiano, who tightened the reins offensively at Rutgers, be afraid of getting into shootouts (something Wannstedt avoided like the plague), which very well might happen with teams such as the Saints and Panthers in the NFC South?

“If I think if we have the people, I’m not,” Schiano said. “When we had [ Mike] Teel, Ray Rice, and Kenny [ Britt] and [ Tiquan Underwood at Rutgers], we had a 3,000-yard quarterback and 2,000-yard running back and two 1,000-yard receivers, we pushed the ball down the field. We really believed in doing that. After that, I don’t really know if we had the personnel to do it, you know what I mean?

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“It’s nice to say, ‘I want to do this and I want to do that.’ I think one of the best things Bill [ Belichick] does is, ‘What do you have? OK, now how can we win with what we have?’ Not, ‘I want to be this.’

“I may want to be something, too, but if you don’t have the people to do it, you can’t. And that was always our deal there and I thought because of the way we played defense there, [being conservative on offense] gave us a chance.”

The biggest thing Schiano will have to prove is that he can win the do-or-die games. He did a tremendous job getting downtrodden Rutgers even to respectability, and that’s coming from an alumnus.

But after posting the history-making upset over No. 3 Louisville in 2006, Rutgers failed to achieve the only thing missing on Schiano’s résumé: a Big East championship and a BCS berth in a conference that was struggling.

That’s his one regret.

“No doubt, yup,” he said. “Dropped pass in the back of the end zone at West Virginia. Blown fumble call at West Virginia in ’06. There were a lot of [missed opportunities] and you look back and say, ‘Could have been.’

“Sometimes when you have to be darned near perfect to get to where you get to, you understand that the other team is on scholarship, too, and may have some advantages that you don’t at the end of the day. Do I think it can be done there? I do, there’s no doubt. Sometimes someone else needs to do it. If that makes sense.”

Schiano believes he’ll push through with the Bucs, because there are no disadvantages from team to team in the NFL.

“I wouldn’t have taken the job had I not believed we could win it.”


TBayXXXVII

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« #29 : August 27, 2012, 10:59:23 AM »

From the Boston Globe: http://articles.boston.com/2012-08-26/sports/33379272_1_buccaneers-greg-schiano-raheem-morris


Greg Schiano and Buccaneers are a perfect fit....

It's partly why I said, IF Freeman is "the guy", this is a 10+ win team.
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