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michael89156

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: December 13, 2012, 12:12:03 AM



Bucs Q&A: Why don't Bucs' cornerbacks disrupt receivers' routes?


 By TBO.com

 Published: December 12, 2012


 
Q: According to the rules, a cornerback has 5 yards to disrupt the receiver's rhythm when beginning their route. A CB also can line up 1 yard off the line of scrimmage. Why is it that the Bucs' corners basically stand close enough to the receiver that they can know what toothpaste he uses, then at the snap of the ball, they open up their hips and let the receiver go? Every receiver gets into his pattern uninterrupted by Bucs corners. Look at the teams with high sack totals. Their corners are basically inside the receiver's jersey up till and sometimes past the 5-yard mark. Even more annoying, the Bucs corners try to run with the receivers and keep getting torched. If they can't keep up with the receivers by just running with them, why would they not try and disrupt them? Pass defense is a mixture of pressure up front and coverage on the backside. The guys up front have no shot at getting to the QB, when the corners are taught not to engage the receiver. You can't play Cover/Tampa 2 if you don't re-route/disrupt the receiver. It's a joke when I hear how the Bucs are thin at corner, without Aqib Talib and Eric Wright. They were at their worst when the two played together (Giants game, anyone?) And to think, the Bucs told Jonathan Joseph they weren't interested in his services. Wow.
 
Sean, Cherry Hill, N.J.
 
A: Everything depends on the particular coverage that's chosen for each individual play. The corners will sometimes play tight to the line to give the impression they're playing man but then back off into a zone. The Bucs use a lot of mixed coverages and in a lot of those cases the corner's job is to release or let the safeties take over after a few yards. That's done to protect against a run. I agree that the Bucs would probably help their pass rushers by playing a little more physical, but with the current group's inexperience and lack of elite size, that may be asking too much of them right now. Something else to consider right now is the fact that the Bucs biggest objective at this point in the secondary is to keep the play in front of them. That's how you eliminate the big plays and they have cut down on those in recent weeks.
 
Roy Cummings

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#1 : December 13, 2012, 12:57:35 AM



Bucs Q&A: Why don't Bucs' cornerbacks disrupt receivers' routes?


 By TBO.com

 Published: December 12, 2012


 
Q: According to the rules, a cornerback has 5 yards to disrupt the receiver's rhythm when beginning their route. A CB also can line up 1 yard off the line of scrimmage. Why is it that the Bucs' corners basically stand close enough to the receiver that they can know what toothpaste he uses, then at the snap of the ball, they open up their hips and let the receiver go? Every receiver gets into his pattern uninterrupted by Bucs corners. Look at the teams with high sack totals. Their corners are basically inside the receiver's jersey up till and sometimes past the 5-yard mark. Even more annoying, the Bucs corners try to run with the receivers and keep getting torched. If they can't keep up with the receivers by just running with them, why would they not try and disrupt them? Pass defense is a mixture of pressure up front and coverage on the backside. The guys up front have no shot at getting to the QB, when the corners are taught not to engage the receiver. You can't play Cover/Tampa 2 if you don't re-route/disrupt the receiver. It's a joke when I hear how the Bucs are thin at corner, without Aqib Talib and Eric Wright. They were at their worst when the two played together (Giants game, anyone?) And to think, the Bucs told Jonathan Joseph they weren't interested in his services. Wow.
 
Sean, Cherry Hill, N.J.
 


A: Because that's not how we did it at Rutgers

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youngone

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#2 : December 13, 2012, 01:11:49 AM



Bucs Q&A: Why don't Bucs' cornerbacks disrupt receivers' routes?


 By TBO.com

 Published: December 12, 2012


 
Q: According to the rules, a cornerback has 5 yards to disrupt the receiver's rhythm when beginning their route. A CB also can line up 1 yard off the line of scrimmage. Why is it that the Bucs' corners basically stand close enough to the receiver that they can know what toothpaste he uses, then at the snap of the ball, they open up their hips and let the receiver go? Every receiver gets into his pattern uninterrupted by Bucs corners. Look at the teams with high sack totals. Their corners are basically inside the receiver's jersey up till and sometimes past the 5-yard mark. Even more annoying, the Bucs corners try to run with the receivers and keep getting torched. If they can't keep up with the receivers by just running with them, why would they not try and disrupt them? Pass defense is a mixture of pressure up front and coverage on the backside. The guys up front have no shot at getting to the QB, when the corners are taught not to engage the receiver. You can't play Cover/Tampa 2 if you don't re-route/disrupt the receiver. It's a joke when I hear how the Bucs are thin at corner, without Aqib Talib and Eric Wright. They were at their worst when the two played together (Giants game, anyone?) And to think, the Bucs told Jonathan Joseph they weren't interested in his services. Wow.
 
Sean, Cherry Hill, N.J.
 
A: Everything depends on the particular coverage that's chosen for each individual play. The corners will sometimes play tight to the line to give the impression they're playing man but then back off into a zone. The Bucs use a lot of mixed coverages and in a lot of those cases the corner's job is to release or let the safeties take over after a few yards. That's done to protect against a run. I agree that the Bucs would probably help their pass rushers by playing a little more physical, but with the current group's inexperience and lack of elite size, that may be asking too much of them right now. Something else to consider right now is the fact that the Bucs biggest objective at this point in the secondary is to keep the play in front of them. That's how you eliminate the big plays and they have cut down on those in recent weeks.
 
Roy Cummings

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#3 : December 13, 2012, 01:28:37 AM

....Because Tampa is the living embodiment of BS PI calls?

Naismith was right about Revis. Everyone else is a dummy.

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#4 : December 13, 2012, 01:54:54 AM

Time to stray from the accepted norm.

Chief Joseph

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#5 : December 13, 2012, 10:25:06 AM


I've studied the finely honed technique of Leonard The Lump, and it consists of standing about three yards off the LOS until the receiver runs past you, then turn and follow him, already beaten. How could this possibly be improved?

Illuminator is a good poster. He sticks to his guns and makes good points. Some don\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\'t like that.

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#6 : December 13, 2012, 11:26:27 AM

Good question and completely useless attempt at an answer by Roy. We might get beat deep now and then, but at least we wouldn't be giving up everything underneath on every play. CBs need to be pressing... Period.

Also, the whole d-line needs to watch JJ Watt film and learn how to get their hands up if they aren't getting to the QB.


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#7 : December 13, 2012, 11:28:34 AM

Questions Roy Cummings isn't qualified to answer for $500, Alex.

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#8 : December 13, 2012, 12:22:26 PM

Questions Roy Cummings isn't qualified to answer for $500, Alex.

What is "everything football related?"



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#9 : December 13, 2012, 12:51:33 PM

The way the corners are playing: Technique wise that is, leads me to believe that are playing some form of spot dropping or pattern reading/matching - on occasion - it closely resembles a form of off man coverage - but even in Cover 2 zone coverages teams still press at the LOS. The angled stances of the Bucs CB's is detrimental - if a receiver threatens the corners outside shoulder for an outside release the corner is already beaten. Do to his stance and not having his shoulders square to the LOS. Not jamming receivers - allowing them a free release doesn't allow for disruption of timing and patterns. Thus, the defensive line losses precious seconds off of its available time to get a meaningful pass rush.

In Football, RESPECT is never given freely by your opponent. It must be TAKEN from them...VIOLENTLY

Great players cost a lot of money but help win games. High-priced players - a byproduct of poorly run front offices with bad scouting departments - only cost a lot of money.
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#10 : December 13, 2012, 10:36:09 PM

I've noticed they will be right on the line and before the snap open there hips and take two steps back then the ball is snapped.  Now what route does this open up?  The slant.  And guess what happened in Atlanta when it was 3rd and 5 and they needed a first to run the clock, they ran the slant.  I've said it for a while, man up press the receiver and that can result in more sacks.  If your playing zone, fine still knock the reciever off his route and get to your zone.  It's sickening watching receivers just run what ever route they want and our guy being 3 steps behind.  Hopefully that changes.



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