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michael89156

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« : February 18, 2013, 12:02:25 AM »



Under Pressure: Josh Freeman Must Handle the Pass Rush Better

Feb 17th, 2013 at 6:20 pm

by Leo Howell







 
As Queen and David Bowie told us so long ago, pressure pushes down on you and me, and no man would ask for such a situation. Being under pressure is a cause of frustration and a loss of productivity in any professional situation. The artist who has to create the perfect work on a tight deadline, the middle manager who has to improve sales numbers by the end of the quarter, or the quarterback who has large, athletic men chasing him with the intent of causing him bodily harm. Since this is not a self-help website, and I only minored in psychology in college, we’ll ignore the ramifications of the first two scenarios, and focus on the third. How much does pressure affect an NFL quarterback, and how can the Buccaneers learn from knowing more about how pressure impacts their signal caller?
 




I think every Buccaneer fan can agree that the 2010 version of Josh Freeman was one of the best quarterbacks in team history, and a return to that form would do wonders for the Buccaneer offense. Looking back at that season, we can see what Josh did well, and how things have changed since. According to Pro Football Focus, Freeman had a QB Rating of 80 on plays where he faced pressure from the defense, and a rating of 105 on plays he did not face pressure. His completion percentage on those plays raised from 50.9 to 67.1, respectively. The blocking schemes and defenses dictated that Freeman saw 100 more pressure-free plays than plays where he was under duress, so Freeman was able to take his time and make better decisions. His numbers against pressure were still respectable, and he showed an ability to manage stressful situations. In 2011, Freeman took a step back in all aspects of his game, but the difference in his statistics while under the strain of a pass rush as compared to being well-protected stayed virtually the same. Freeman threw more interceptions when given time in the pocket, but completed 67 percent of his passes, and saw much more production when allowed the opportunity to go through his progressions.
 
In 2012, Freeman took an incredible step forward (or, back towards his 2010 form) when undeterred by pass rushers.  Josh registered a 96 passer rating, and threw only 8 picks in almost 400 dropbacks that saw him have time to throw. He completed over 60 percent of his passes in these situations, and threw 20 of his 27 touchdowns. However, he was brutal when facing pressure, with a QB rating under 50, and 9 interceptions in only 200 dropbacks. Put another way, Josh threw a pick in 2% of his pressure-free dropbacks, but gave the ball to the opponent on almost 5% of his pressured attempts.This proves that Josh is having no problems developing as a passer when things are going well, but is still struggling to cope with less picturesque situations.
 
Under current Bucs’ offensive coordinator Mike Sullivan, Eli Manning posted an 80.9 passer rating against pressure in his incredible 2011 season. The reason that Sullivan was brought to Tampa was to see Josh Freeman develop the same way Eli did under the QB coach’s watch. Much like Eli in 2010, Josh has taken a step forward on his easier throws under Sullivan. The challenge for the Buccaneers offensive leader is to emulate Manning’s 2011 season, and make a vast improvement on his pressured throws. While I have my doubts about Josh Freeman, the numbers don’t lie. A Josh Freeman that can handle pressure is a lock to be a top flight NFL quarterback for a long, long time.




http://thepewterplank.com/2013/02/17/under-pressure-josh-freeman-must-handle-the-pass-rush-better/

tatmanfish

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« #1 : February 18, 2013, 03:50:44 AM »

I think the lack of running plays a part. It seems to me that they are trying to build a pocker passer out of him and having him avoid using his feet. I think it would take some pressure off knowing you could run when it broke down early. Instead hes staying in the pocket and working it downfield resulting in worse results. Imo, a 5-10 yard scramble is better than play that could result in a sack, int, incomplete pass, or an intercetion.

It also requires he d to play more assignment sound and not just shoot for penetration....giving the qb an extra second or so.

Maybe its their lack of trust I n his ball security when running? Either way, I think hes best off some where between a pocket passer and a scambler. Much like Big Ben was used. Hopefully he either takes the next step to becoming a pocket passer or the coaching allows him to scramble a little more.



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dalbuc

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« #2 : February 18, 2013, 08:11:18 AM »


Dear god why is it everyone think Freeman's running, or "lack" there of is the problem. The dude ran 55 times in 2011 and sucked, he ran 39 times this year and was better relatively speaking. His ypa is really low by QB measures (4.7 ypc) over his career so it isn't like he's proficient or even close to good at it.

Freeman's problem is that he's not a fast decison maker so pressure makes him have to do everything faster and his reads and mechanics breakdown under the assault. It isn't really something that's gonna change you either have the pocket awareness and cool factor to stand pressure or you don't.

All posts are opinions in case you are too stupid to figure that out on your own without me saying it over and over.

The Franchi5e

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« #3 : February 18, 2013, 09:11:34 AM »


Dear god why is it everyone think Freeman's running, or "lack" there of is the problem. The dude ran 55 times in 2011 and sucked, he ran 39 times this year and was better relatively speaking. His ypa is really low by QB measures (4.7 ypc) over his career so it isn't like he's proficient or even close to good at it.

Freeman's problem is that he's not a fast decison maker so pressure makes him have to do everything faster and his reads and mechanics breakdown under the assault. It isn't really something that's gonna change you either have the pocket awareness and cool factor to stand pressure or you don't.

Freeman handled the pressure coming at him like a damn champ in 2010. It's not that we think that he's Kaepernick or RG3 in terms of running, it's just that instead of trying to move his feet and avoid a hit like he used to he goes into panic mode and throws up some ridiculous **CENSORED** in the air for an interception. And sometimes when there's a clear open hole for him to run and no receivers open he doesn't do it. A 5 yard run and slide up the middle is a lot better than an incompletion or interception/near interception. It keeps the momentum going. He was terrible at protecting the ball at times though and I think that may be a big reason why he doesn't do it as much anymore. It's all in his head.

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« #4 : February 18, 2013, 09:51:52 AM »

Freeman. His brain is the Commodore 64 of the NFL.


BucBalla85

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« #5 : February 18, 2013, 12:34:07 PM »

Freemans gotta get his **CENSORED** together or he will be finding a new job next offseason. I dont think Schiano will have much more patience with him but I do think he will get him to work his ass off this offseason to turning his game around. Hopefully thats the case.

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« #6 : February 18, 2013, 03:28:23 PM »

Maybe some QB's handle pressure better than others.  Pressure didn't seem to bother a young Vick, but Freeman and Flacco both seem affected by pressure.

Balt came up with a better OL in the playoffs and Flacco blossomed.

The Bucs get 2 starting guards back which  should help.  Maybe Loadholt in FA for RT, and Free could be a much better QB and the risk of injury much less.

The Anti-Java

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« #7 : February 18, 2013, 09:31:39 PM »


Dear god why is it everyone think Freeman's running, or "lack" there of is the problem. The dude ran 55 times in 2011 and sucked, he ran 39 times this year and was better relatively speaking. His ypa is really low by QB measures (4.7 ypc) over his career so it isn't like he's proficient or even close to good at it.

Freeman's problem is that he's not a fast decison maker so pressure makes him have to do everything faster and his reads and mechanics breakdown under the assault. It isn't really something that's gonna change you either have the pocket awareness and cool factor to stand pressure or you don't.





I think that is the case, and hopefullly its something he can grow out of.   It's doubtful , but lets see how he looks in 2013.


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