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michael89156

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« : March 25, 2013, 12:39:13 AM »




NFP Sunday Blitz

by Dan Pompei

National Football Post


March 24, 02013

 
My Sunday Best: Receiver Free Agents
 
A lot of wide receivers have changed teams via free agency in 20 years, but not many of them have paid off big for their new teams. Here are my Sunday best all-time wide receiver free agent signings. If you think I missed someone, let me know.
 
1. Joe Horn, Saints 2000. He was no more than a complementary receiver with the Chiefs, but he became an instant star in New Orleans, making the Pro Bowl four times in seven years and setting a team record for career touchdown receptions. He was a rare wide receiver free agent signing in that he became a much better player after joining a new team.
 
2. Jimmy Smith, Jaguars 1995. A second round pick, Smith couldn’t stay healthy and subsequently was cut by the Cowboys and then the Eagles. The expansion Jaguars picked him up and 12,287 yards and five Pro Bowls later, Smith clearly was one of the all-time great wide receiver pickups.
 



Vincent Jackson is one difficult receiver to defend.
 
3. Vincent Jackson, Bucs 2012. A lot of receivers have gone into the tank after getting paid in free agency. In his first season in Tampa Bay, Jackson was dominant and had career numbers in catches, yards and average per catch.
 
4. Keenan McCardell, Jaguars 1996. He parlayed a nice season in Cleveland into a nice contract with the Jags, and then he really blossomed. In six seasons in Jacksonville, McCardell hit 1,000 receiving yards four times. He had another 1,000 yard receiving season in Tampa Bay after leaving the Jags. The 12th round pick lasted 16 years in the NFL.
 
5. Ed McCaffrey, Broncos 1995. Upon joining his third NFL team McCaffrey didn’t become a superstar. But he did become a productive player and key piece in an offense that won two Super Bowls in Denver. McCaffrey even made it to one Pro Bowl.
 
6. Terrell Owens, Cowboys 2006. Four days after he was cut by the Eagles, Owens was signed by the Cowboys. In Dallas, he was no angel. But he had three straight 1,000 seasons and made it to a Pro Bowl.
 
7. Jerry Rice, Raiders 2001. When Rice’s production dropped in 1999 and 2000, the 49ers gave up on the GOAT after 16 seasons. He promptly crossed the San Francisco Bay to play for the rival Raiders. In Oakland, a revitalized Rice had two straight 1,000 yard receiving seasons, he made it to a Super Bowl and a Pro Bowl.
 
8. Plaxico Burress, Giants 2005. After six years as a Steeler, Burress was signed to a big money deal by the G-Men. He averaged 78 yards per game for the Giants after averaging 57 yards per game for the Steelers. And he caught 10 more touchdown passes for the Giants in 17 fewer games than he played for the Steelers.
 


Things I Didn’t Used to Know
 
*One of the reasons the Ravens didn’t flinch about losing Paul Kruger is they believe Courtney Upshaw is ready to step into a larger role. Ravens coach John Harbaugh told me Upshaw was “dominant on the edge” in his first season, and he liked the physicality with which Upshaw played. But Upshaw didn’t get as many opportunities to rush the passer in part because of the presence of Kruger. The Ravens believe Upshaw is ready to blossom as a pass rusher and become a complete player.
 
*New Colts offensive coordinator Pep Hamilton is trying to minimize changes in the playbook and adapt as much of Bruce Arians’ offense as possible to make it easier on his young players. That includes terminology, formations and personnel groups. Even though Andrew Luck is familiar with Hamilton’s old offense because they worked together at Stanford, Hamilton and Chuck Pagano don’t want to burden the rest of the offense too much. And, they want to stick with what worked.
 



One Man Yelp: Earn The Right To Win
 





Tom Coughlin is one of those bosses who bugs his employees but makes them better. That’s one of the things that comes across in his new book Earn The Right To Win: How Success in Any Field Starts with Superior Preparation. It’s a good look inside the mind of a sometimes misunderstood man.
 
Written with David Fisher, the Giants coach reveals how his fastidiousness has led him to success. For instance:
 
Tom Coughlin may be quirky, but he knows how to get a Gatorade shower.
 
*Coughlin writes that he makes schedules sometimes as far as a year in advance. He not only schedules his time by the hour, but by the minute. “My players in Jacksonville used to joke that I was so focused on using every second of every minute of the day that I would plan my restroom breaks a week in advance,” he writes. “Obviously that wasn’t true. A day in advance, maybe.”
 
*During the 2011 lockout, he had assistant coach Chris Pridy draw up a potential off-season schedule at the beginning of the lockout, and then he had him update it every day so that if the lockout suddenly ended, the Giants had an offseason schedule in place and there would be no time wasted.
 
*He said he writes lists of the lists he has to make.
 
*Former Jaguars great Tony Boselli used to complain he needed to carry a cheat sheet just to keep all of Coughlin’s rules straight.
 
*His wife forced him to sign a contract saying he would take five days off in the offseason. She tried to renegotiate for seven days. He would have none of it.
 
I found this very interesting from Michael Strahan, who wrote the forward: “He is not a physically demanding coach. Physically, he was the easiest coach I ever played for. But mentally, I’ve known few people like him.” Some of the anecdotes in the book from Coughlin’s Jacksonville days don’t paint the same picture, which probably is a reflection of how Coughlin has evolved as a coach.
 
Coughlin’s way might not work for everyone. But you can’t argue that it has worked for him.
 



Dan Pompei covers pro football for the Chicago Tribune at chicagotribune.com.

danlowe748

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« #1 : March 25, 2013, 12:51:24 AM »

 I think this list is premature.   The Bucs signed Antonio Bryant for about 1/15th of what they paid Vincent Jackson and Bryant had similar numbers his first year with the Bucs.   If you compare Vincent Jackson and Antonio Bryant signings after just their first year, the Bryant signing was way better due to the huge difference in salaries.

Byrant     1,248 yards and 7 TDs, salary cap hit $1 million his first year with the Bucs   
Jackson 1,398 yards and 8 TDs  salary cap hit  $15 million his first year with the Bucs

tatmanfish

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« #2 : March 25, 2013, 03:52:03 AM »

I think this list is premature.   The Bucs signed Antonio Bryant for about 1/15th of what they paid Vincent Jackson and Bryant had similar numbers his first year with the Bucs.   If you compare Vincent Jackson and Antonio Bryant signings after just their first year, the Bryant signing was way better due to the huge difference in salaries.

Byrant     1,248 yards and 7 TDs, salary cap hit $1 million his first year with the Bucs   
Jackson 1,398 yards and 8 TDs  salary cap hit  $15 million his first year with the Bucs

to be fair, Bryant was a product of Grudens 1 WR offense. his 1st year here Clayton was the 2nd leading WR with something like 450yds. The next year Winslow outshined him easily. Bryants biggest competition was a needy TE with bum  knees. enter Mike Williams and Bryant was just an afterthought.



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1sparkybuc

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« #3 : March 25, 2013, 09:30:58 AM »

On a positive note, VJax had career highs in three categories in his first year in a new system with a new QB. He should have even better stats in his second year. Not sure what that says about Phillip Rivers and  Norv Turner.
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