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Naismith

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#30 : May 10, 2013, 01:22:39 PM

Again, the blackout rules that are already in place are there because of federal regulations put in place a long time ago. The government is already involved.

From the wikipedia entry I posted above, it appears like the blackouts were in place prior to government involvement.

There\'s a very real chance the Bucs waive [Revis] before next season. At the very least, it will be a discussion worth having.

Sailing2smth

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#31 : May 10, 2013, 01:30:33 PM

Blackouts exist because of federal regulations so Senator McCain is doing his job.

Obama doesn't address this issue because he is more woman than man and has never played a sport in his life.

Loving the latest developments in the Benghazi cover-up!

Hopefully this ruins Hillarious Clinton for 2016.


Also, you'd think the Commander in Chief would have a clue as to what was going on.
Same with the Campaigner in Chief...  :P :-*

IMPEACH OBAMA.

What do the tragic events that happened in Benghazi have anything to do with the NFL?

Morgan

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#32 : May 10, 2013, 01:47:01 PM

Blackouts exist because of federal regulations so Senator McCain is doing his job.

Obama doesn't address this issue because he is more woman than man and has never played a sport in his life.

Loving the latest developments in the Benghazi cover-up!



Four unfortunate deaths related to the improper handling of Libya's embassy. Never should have left that building improperly secured. Big mistakes made.

But in comparison to the number of deaths and costs of the Iraqi War (drawn in my Bush administration's argument that WMD were present), the Benghazi incident pales in comparison.  Impeach Obama -okay. Jail GWB and his conspirators for their gross imcompetence/negligence as well.

ingey1968

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#33 : May 10, 2013, 02:54:22 PM

Blackouts exist because of federal regulations so Senator McCain is doing his job.

Obama doesn't address this issue because he is more woman than man and has never played a sport in his life.

Loving the latest developments in the Benghazi cover-up!



Four unfortunate deaths related to the improper handling of Libya's embassy. Never should have left that building improperly secured. Big mistakes made.

But in comparison to the number of deaths and costs of the Iraqi War (drawn in my Bush administration's argument that WMD were present), the Benghazi incident pales in comparison.  Impeach Obama -okay. Jail GWB and his conspirators for their gross imcompetence/negligence as well.

While you are at it, throw Rumsfeld in a turkish prison

ryan24

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#34 : May 10, 2013, 03:03:11 PM

I doubt a challenge is successful. I'm pretty sure the policy has been challenged a couple of times in the past to no avail.

Happy and Peppy and Bursting with love.

buccaneer4ever

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#35 : May 10, 2013, 03:13:02 PM

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NFL_on_television#Blackout_policies

Since 1973, the NFL has maintained a blackout policy that states that a home game cannot be televised locally if it is not sold out 72 hours prior to its start time. Prior to 1973, all games were blacked out in the home city of origin regardless of whether they were sold out. This policy, dating back to the NFL's emerging television years, resulted in home-city blackouts even during championship games. For instance, the 1958 "Greatest Game Ever Played" between the Baltimore Colts and New York Giants was unavailable to New York fans despite the sellout. (Many fans rented hotel rooms in Connecticut to watch the game on Hartford TV, a practice that continued for Giants games through 1972.) Similarly, all Super Bowl games prior to 1973 were unavailable in the host city's market.

The policy was put into effect when, in 1972, the Washington Redskins made the playoffs for only the second time in 27 seasons. Because all home games were blacked-out, politicians including devout football fan President Richard Nixon were not able to watch their home team win. NFL commissioner Pete Rozelle refused to lift the blackout, despite a plea from United States Attorney General Richard Kleindienst. Kleindienst was to suggest that the United States Congress re-evaluate the NFL's antitrust exemption.
Rozelle agreed to lift the blackout for Super Bowl VII on an "experimental basis." But Congress intervened before the 1973 season anyway, passing Public Law 93-107, which eliminated the blackout of games in the home market so long as the game was sold out by 72 hours before game time.[27] The league will sometimes change this deadline to 48 hours if there are only a few thousand tickets left unsold; much more rarely, they will occasionally extend this to 24 hours in special cases.

I am not sure if you simply don't know about the law I was speaking of, or if you were doing this just to try and spin your point, but:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sports_Broadcasting_Act_of_1961
Quote
The Sports Broadcasting Act of 1961 affects Title 15 of the United States Code, Chapter 32 "Telecasting of Professional Sports Contest" ( 1291-1295) [1]

Overview [edit]

The Sports Broadcasting Act was passed in response to a court decision which ruled that the NFL's method of negotiating television broadcasting rights violated antitrust laws. The court ruled that the "pooling" of rights by all the teams to conclude an exclusive contract between the league and CBS was illegal.

The Act overrules that decision, and permits certain joint broadcasting agreements among the major professional sports. It recognizes the fact that the various franchises in a sports league, while competitors in the sporting sense, are not as much business competitors as they are interdepedent partners, whose success as enterprises is intertwined, as a certain level of competitive balance between them must exist for any of them to remain viable enterprises. Therefore, it permits the sale of a television "package" to a network or networks in which the league members share equally, a procedure which is common today. Of the four major North American professional team sports, the Act is most pertinent to the NFL, as all of its regular-season and playoff games are covered by the rights assigned by its various packages with the networks, including its own.

The law has been interpreted to include the so-called "blackout rules" which protect a home team from competing games broadcast into its home territory on a day when it is playing a game at home, and from having to broadcast games within its home market area that have not sold out. It also, in effect, protects high school football and college football game attendance by blacking out pro football games locally on Friday evenings and Saturdays during those sports' regular seasons; these measures effectively outlawed the broadcasting (and, in practice, the playing) of NFL games on those days, since virtually all of the country is within 75 miles of at least one high school game on every Friday night in September and October.

This portion of the act has since been partially circumvented; the NFL extended its season in 1978 to allow several weeks of Friday night or Saturday games if the league so wished. Late-season Saturday games have been common since then, but Friday night games are still extremely rare; the league has played only eight Friday games since 1978, all but one in December (a Chiefs-Dolphins game set for Miami on Sunday, October 23, 2005, was moved up two days due to Hurricane Wilma).

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)'s broadcast packages are not subject to the antitrust exemption and it suffered for it, when the Supreme Court ruled that the NCAA's restrictive television policies were a violation of antitrust law in the 1980s when the University of Georgia and the University of Oklahoma sued the NCAA over television restrictions (limit of six television appearances over two years) established in 1952. However, after their court victory, neither Georgia nor Oklahoma made serious efforts to market their own television packages, but instead followed the lead of their conferences, the Southeastern Conference and the Big 8 Conference respectively.

The College Football Association, an alliance of 64 schools from some of the major conferences and selected independents, sold their own television package in 1984, first to ABC, and later to CBS. The Big Ten and Pac-8 conferences, not CFA affiliates, sold their own separate package, to ABC.

By 1990, the landscape changed. ABC had both the CFA, Big Ten, and Pac-10 packages, and NBC the Notre Dame home package. It was once again relegated to limited appearances.

The CFA collapsed, and in 1995, the Southeastern Conference signed a national deal with CBS. They are the only major conference guaranteed a national "game of the week" because ESPN's games may come from any of the conferences they offer.[2]

Bolded the important part.


Bayfisher

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#36 : May 10, 2013, 03:15:33 PM

I thought the blackouts were established by the Govt. to combat greedy owners.  The NFL can do nothing about them.  Congress has to do it.

Naismith

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#37 : May 10, 2013, 04:47:04 PM

I am not sure if you simply don't know about the law I was speaking of, or if you were doing this just to try and spin your point, but:

Definitely didn't know the law you were speaking of.

As I interpret that (and I am neither a lawyer nor intelligent), that is saying that the law protected the league's right to jointly sell broadcasting rights rather than each individual team and that it didn't create the blackout rules, it just was later interpreted to protect the league's right to blackout games.

There\'s a very real chance the Bucs waive [Revis] before next season. At the very least, it will be a discussion worth having.

ingey1968

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#38 : May 10, 2013, 04:53:04 PM

only problem with it is that he included it in the Television Consumer Freedom Act of 2013, legislation that would encourage cable operators and entertainment conglomerates to unbundle channels and offer programming "a la carte..  It has very little chance of passing

buccaneer4ever

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#39 : May 10, 2013, 05:09:51 PM

I am not sure if you simply don't know about the law I was speaking of, or if you were doing this just to try and spin your point, but:

Definitely didn't know the law you were speaking of.

As I interpret that (and I am neither a lawyer nor intelligent), that is saying that the law protected the league's right to jointly sell broadcasting rights rather than each individual team and that it didn't create the blackout rules, it just was later interpreted to protect the league's right to blackout games.

Correct. The problem is that the original law has set a precedent which has led to further rulings. Even if Senator McCain's law passes (it won't) there would likely be litigation brought by involved parties that would delay an overturn of the blackout policy.


DejaVu

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#40 : May 10, 2013, 10:44:35 PM

While you are at it, throw Rumsfeld in a turkish prison

Rumsfeld, Bush, Cheney, throw them all in there.   But McCain was a better choice than Obama.   It's a shame he ran following Bush because that alone caused the country to vote the wrong man into office.

Fran Tarkenton, Hall of Fame QB said. \\\"Ive watched Freeman a lot. He just plays God-awful. Thats who you are. Its just a player being able to play or not play. Josh Freeman has proven to me that he cant play.\\\"

buccaneer4ever

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#41 : May 10, 2013, 11:25:21 PM

While you are at it, throw Rumsfeld in a turkish prison

Rumsfeld, Bush, Cheney, throw them all in there.   But McCain was a better choice than Obama.   It's a shame he ran following Bush because that alone caused the country to vote the wrong man into office.

Also, the Iraq war had become extremely unpopular and Obama was promising to bring the troops home. McCain refused to make any promises.


El Diablo

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#42 : May 10, 2013, 11:27:19 PM

While you are at it, throw Rumsfeld in a turkish prison

Rumsfeld, Bush, Cheney, throw them all in there.   But McCain was a better choice than Obama.   It's a shame he ran following Bush because that alone caused the country to vote the wrong man into office.

Nobody cares about the political diarrhea coming out of your mouth. I don't talk about how bass fishing sucks on here even though its true. Go somewhere else with that **CENSORED**. Talk football ass.

Morgan

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#43 : May 11, 2013, 04:09:23 PM

While you are at it, throw Rumsfeld in a turkish prison

Rumsfeld, Bush, Cheney, throw them all in there.   But McCain was a better choice than Obama.   It's a shame he ran following Bush because that alone caused the country to vote the wrong man into office.

Had he not selected that airhead as his VEEP runningmate, he may have won the thing......

DejaVu

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#44 : May 11, 2013, 05:04:45 PM

While you are at it, throw Rumsfeld in a turkish prison

Rumsfeld, Bush, Cheney, throw them all in there.   But McCain was a better choice than Obama.   It's a shame he ran following Bush because that alone caused the country to vote the wrong man into office.

Had he not selected that airhead as his VEEP runningmate, he may have won the thing......

Not a chance.

Fran Tarkenton, Hall of Fame QB said. \\\"Ive watched Freeman a lot. He just plays God-awful. Thats who you are. Its just a player being able to play or not play. Josh Freeman has proven to me that he cant play.\\\"
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