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CalcuttaRain

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« #30 : March 17, 2014, 09:07:34 AM »

Landed somewhere remote, then customized somewhere to match a different plane, including resetting the transponder. When the plane it matches is over a remote area, it's brought down. The refigured plane takes its place, and can fly a nuclear weapon directly into in city in the world.

wow

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dalbuc

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« #31 : March 17, 2014, 09:22:14 AM »

Problem is that a 777 needs a lot of space to land there are not that many runaways that can accommodate a plane that size AND are not anywhere near a population center that would have seen it land.

All posts are opinions in case you are too stupid to figure that out on your own without me saying it over and over.

CalcuttaRain

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« #32 : March 17, 2014, 09:25:08 AM »

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/A/AS_MALAYSIA_PLANE_SUICIDE?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2014-03-17-00-50-29

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) -- As police investigate the two pilots of a Malaysian passenger jet that disappeared more than a week ago, a possibility they must consider - however remote and improbable - is that one of them committed suicide - and mass murder in the process.

While such incidents have happened before, the topic remains almost taboo, with investigators and officials reluctant to conclude that a pilot purposely crashed a plane in order to commit suicide even when the evidence appears compelling.

A dozen years ago, U.S. investigators filed a final report into the 1999 crash of EgyptAir Flight 990, which plunged into the Atlantic Ocean near the Massachusetts island of Nantucket, killing all 217 aboard. They concluded that when co-pilot Gameel El-Batouty found himself alone on the flight deck, he switched off the auto-pilot, pointed the plane downward, and calmly repeated the phrase "I rely on God" over and over, 11 times in total.

Yet while the National Transportation Safety Board concluded that the co-pilot's actions caused the crash, they didn't use the word "suicide" in the main findings of their 160-page report, instead saying the reason for his actions "was not determined." Egyptian officials, meanwhile, rejected the notion of suicide altogether, insisting instead there was some mechanical reason for the crash.

There was also disagreement over the cause of the crash of SilkAir Flight 185, which plunged into a river in 1997 during a flight from Jakarta, Indonesia, to Singapore, killing all 104 passengers and crew. A U.S. investigation found that the Boeing 737 had been deliberately crashed, but an Indonesian investigation was inconclusive.

Mozambique officials have been investigating a crash that killed 33 people in November. They say preliminary investigations indicate that the pilot of the Mozambican Airline plane bound for Angola intentionally brought it down, and they're continuing to look into his possible motives.

A 2014 study by the Federal Aviation Administration indicates that in the U.S. at least, flying remains a remarkably safe mode of transport and pilot suicide is a rare occurrence.

The study found that during the 10 years ending in 2012, just eight of 2,758 fatal aviation accidents in the U.S. were caused by pilot suicide, a rate of 0.3 percent. The report found that all eight suicides were men, with four of them testing positive for alcohol and two for antidepressants.

The cases ranged from a pilot celebrating his 21st birthday who realized a woman didn't want a relationship with him, to a 69-year-old pilot with a history of drinking and threatening suicide by plane. Seven of the cases involved the death of only the pilot; in the eighth case, a passenger also died.

"Aircraft-assisted suicides are tragic, intentional events that are hard to predict and difficult to prevent," the FAA's report found, adding that such suicides "are most likely under-reported and under-recognized."

In at least one case, a major international airline allowed a pilot who had expressed suicidal thoughts to continue flying. He flew nearly three more years, without incident, before he resigned in 1982 with severe obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety and depression.

The Sydney Morning Herald newspaper reported that the Workers Compensation Commission heard that the Qantas pilot struggled several times to resist an overwhelming urge to switch off the plane's engines. Once during a flight to Singapore, the pilot's hand moved "involuntarily" toward the start levers and he was forced to "immobilize his left arm in order not to act on the compulsion."

"He left the flight deck and, once he felt calm enough, returned to his seat," the newspaper reported.

After telling his colleagues of his urges, the newspaper said, the pilot was examined by several doctors and ultimately declared fit to fly.

Malaysia's government said police on Saturday searched the homes of both the pilot and the co-pilot of the missing Malaysia Airlines jet. It said police were examining an elaborate flight simulator taken from the home of 53-year-old pilot Zaharie Ahmad Shah.

Police also are investigating engineers who may have had contact with the plane before it took off.

Mike Glynn, a committee member of the Australian and International Pilots Association, said a pilot rather than a hijacker is more likely to be able to switch off the communications equipment, adding that he thinks suicide was to blame in the EgyptAir and SilkAir crashes.

"The last thing that I, as a pilot, want is su**CENSORED**ion to fall on the crew, but it's happened twice before," Glynn said.

Still, there is no explanation why the pilot of the missing Malaysia Airlines plane would spirit the jet away to an unknown location and not crash it soon after taking off if he had wanted to commit suicide.

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Bucfucious

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« #33 : March 17, 2014, 10:02:11 AM »

If these suicidal pilots had better access to guns, they wouldn't have to crash the whole damn plane just to off themselves.

CalcuttaRain

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« #34 : March 17, 2014, 10:03:19 AM »

If these suicidal pilots had better access to guns, they wouldn't have to crash the whole damn plane just to off themselves.

predictable nonsense^^^ . . . .you think the plane is being turned into a nuclear weapon?

(for what its worth, pilot suicide is a little inconsistent with extended flight, allegedly at low altitude to avoid radar . . just posted the article because it is one of the theories)
« : March 17, 2014, 10:05:36 AM VinBucFan »

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CalcuttaRain

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« #35 : March 17, 2014, 10:07:59 AM »

Malaysia is reportedly investigating a theory that flight MH370 could have slipped under Pakistani radars and landed a Taliban base close to the Afghan border. The pilots’ possible role in the plane’s disappearance is also being examined.

Citing sources, UK newspaper The Independent reported that Malaysian investigators had requested permission from the Pakistani government to follow up a theory that the missing passenger jet had landed close to the border with Afghanistan. The Boeing 777, carrying 239 people, disappeared from radars last week on its way from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. Since then, authorities have been unable to ascertain the whereabouts of the plane, and have not found any wreckage from a crash.

 The Pakistani government says it has no record of the craft entering its airspace, but has told the Malaysian investigators it is ready to share all available information. In addition, The Kazakh Civil Aviation Committee has said that although the Malaysian Airlines plane could have reached Kazakhstan, their radars would have picked it up.

"No information about the Malaysian plane is available at our radar as it has not entered our airspace," Foreign Ministry spokesperson Tasnim Aslam told reporters when asked to comment on the Malaysian government's request. “Our radar system has no information about the Malaysian aircraft as it has never contacted our control tower.”

Pakistan is now one of 25 countries participating in the search for the missing plane.

The Malaysian authorities are investigating a myriad of theories of how the plane disappeared and have not ruled out a possible terrorist attack.

On Saturday, Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak said that investigators had reliable information that someone on the plane had “deliberately disabled” communications systems before the plane vanished. Furthermore, investigators said that it would have taken someone with pilot training to be able to switch off the Aircraft and Communications Addressing and Reporting System, or ACARS. This system automatically sends engine data and other information to the airline.

‘All right, good night’

On Sunday, Malaysian Defense Minister Hishammuddin Hussein told a news conference that the last words to be spoken to air traffic control from onboard the plane were “All right, good night.” This was said after the ACARS system had been switched off and there was no mention of any inflight problems.

 In connection with this new information, authorities are now investigating the pilot, 53-year-old Captain Zaharie Shah. On Sunday authorities searched his home, interviewed his family and took away for analysis a flight simulator he used to practice with in his spare time. The home of co-pilot Fariq Abdul, 27, was also searched.

 In light of the new information, Hussein said that we must not jump to conclusions too quickly as the two pilots did not request to be onboard together and they had also not asked for any extra fuel.

 Malaysian authorities have almost completely ruled out the possibility that one of the passengers had a hand in disabling the communications systems. Khalid Abu Bakar, inspector general of Malaysia’s police, said that they had “cleared” most of the passengers on the plane.

http://rt.com/news/malaysian-plane-investigation-pakistan-238/

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chace1986

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« #36 : March 17, 2014, 02:22:15 PM »

If these suicidal pilots had better access to guns, they wouldn't have to crash the whole damn plane just to off themselves.

LMAO.


freddy

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« #37 : March 17, 2014, 02:47:38 PM »

Maybe there wasn't a hijacker onboard?

http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/162462-hackers-hijack-a-super-yacht-with-simple-gps-spoofing-and-planes-could-be-next

The Anti-Java

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« #38 : March 17, 2014, 11:29:52 PM »

Landed somewhere remote, then customized somewhere to match a different plane, including resetting the transponder. When the plane it matches is over a remote area, it's brought down. The refigured plane takes its place, and can fly a nuclear weapon directly into in city in the world.


Why go through all that though?  If they wanted to fly a nuke into NYC for example. They could do that with a small 2 seater Cessna 150.



gone

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« #39 : March 18, 2014, 12:38:31 AM »

Landed somewhere remote, then customized somewhere to match a different plane, including resetting the transponder. When the plane it matches is over a remote area, it's brought down. The refigured plane takes its place, and can fly a nuclear weapon directly into in city in the world.


Why go through all that though?  If they wanted to fly a nuke into NYC for example. They could do that with a small 2 seater Cessna 150.

Transoceanic capability.  Can't do that with a puddlejumper

freddy

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« #40 : March 18, 2014, 05:48:48 AM »

Isn't this how Jack Ryan became president?

dalbuc

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« #41 : March 18, 2014, 07:51:46 AM »

Landed somewhere remote, then customized somewhere to match a different plane, including resetting the transponder. When the plane it matches is over a remote area, it's brought down. The refigured plane takes its place, and can fly a nuclear weapon directly into in city in the world.


Why go through all that though?  If they wanted to fly a nuke into NYC for example. They could do that with a small 2 seater Cessna 150.

Transoceanic capability.  Can't do that with a puddlejumper

Presumably our radar would be competent enough to notice an unidentified plane that large flying our way. Plus, in terms of delivery with a nuke a boat would be better means of delivery in terms of being less likely to be detected. I mean you could sail a fairly smallish yacht into NY harbor and not get a second look. Now all that means is this isnt optimal not that they wouldnt try it.

Normally this type of theory is way too "weird" but this whole thing makes so little sense you start getting the Sherlock Holmes principle at work. Mechanical failure isn't on the table anymore. Amateur hijackers doesnt work because of the way the plane flew via waypoints - and apparently the NYT is now reporting the plane's nav computer was reset to fly this path. Suicide by pilot doesn't work because you don't fly 7 hours out of your way to kill yourself. Terrorism doesnt work since no one has claimed it and the whole point of terror is to make a point. What you are left with is the rather odd stolen for future use thing.






All posts are opinions in case you are too stupid to figure that out on your own without me saying it over and over.

Skull and Bones

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« #42 : March 18, 2014, 08:30:01 AM »

Solved!



spartan

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« #43 : March 18, 2014, 08:30:46 AM »

Landed somewhere remote, then customized somewhere to match a different plane, including resetting the transponder. When the plane it matches is over a remote area, it's brought down. The refigured plane takes its place, and can fly a nuclear weapon directly into in city in the world.


Why go through all that though?  If they wanted to fly a nuke into NYC for example. They could do that with a small 2 seater Cessna 150.

Transoceanic capability.  Can't do that with a puddlejumper

Presumably our radar would be competent enough to notice an unidentified plane that large flying our way. Plus, in terms of delivery with a nuke a boat would be better means of delivery in terms of being less likely to be detected. I mean you could sail a fairly smallish yacht into NY harbor and not get a second look. Now all that means is this isnt optimal not that they wouldnt try it.

Normally this type of theory is way too "weird" but this whole thing makes so little sense you start getting the Sherlock Holmes principle at work. Mechanical failure isn't on the table anymore. Amateur hijackers doesnt work because of the way the plane flew via waypoints - and apparently the NYT is now reporting the plane's nav computer was reset to fly this path. Suicide by pilot doesn't work because you don't fly 7 hours out of your way to kill yourself. Terrorism doesnt work since no one has claimed it and the whole point of terror is to make a point. What you are left with is the rather odd stolen for future use thing.

Or there was someone on the plane of interest to somebody.

Cyrus

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« #44 : March 18, 2014, 08:44:47 AM »

Solved!



See, I told you from the start it was Aliens.

smh.
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