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Escobar06

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#30 : June 15, 2014, 01:23:00 AM

My advice will be different. I'm not much older than you (33) but I'm old enough to have a different perspective than you, at least when I compare my perspective now to what it was in my early 20's, night and day. My advice is to determine what's important to you, separate your wants from your needs, and attempt to create a career around that in terms of the hours you're looking to work and the pay you expect to receive. For example, is it important to you to own a big home, drive a new or newer car, and have the ability to consistently buy wants such as electronics, more clothes than you really need etc? Or, would you be content living in a smaller home, driving a reliable but older car, and investing your spare money into your retirement instead of spending it on material items?

I'm single and I have no kids, but most of my friends are married with kids. I've known many of these guys my entire life and I've seen changes in them that aren't for the better. Some of them work jobs that require insane hours, they don't spend as much time with their kids as they would like, and because of their heavy schedules the time they do get to spend with their families they are almost too worn out to enjoy it. When you're young you think about money, especially in America. We're conditioned to go after status and money, we're conditioned to believe that trumps everything. When you go through school the emphasis is on your career and the pay you'll get from that career, it's not on the stress that will come from that, or the toll any specific career will have on your family. These kinds of things are good to think about BEFORE you settle on a career, not when you're 10 years in to it wondering what the hell you were thinking in choosing it to begin with.

I read an article recently about a woman who worked for ho**CENSORED**e, she was asked what regrets are most common among the patients she treats as they lay there on their deathbed. She listed several things, but one stood out to me most. She said many women under her care say this, but ALL men say it. They wish they didn't work as much as they did. She said EVERY SINGLE man says this on their death bed. That should really open your eyes. It reminds me of the saying "youth is wasted on the young". In the same sense, it's sad to say that many, or even most, people don't realize that the thing they strive for their entire life, status/money, doesn't even matter. It's not until it's too late, and you're laying there waiting to die, that you finally realize you never cared for those things to begin with.

I look at it this way, there's the proverbial carrot on the end of a stick that everyone chases the moment they're old enough to know what "success" is in America. They think that if they can just get into that college they want to get in to, or get that promotion, get that raise, buy that house or that car, they will FINALLY be content. Wrong. I always point to the Walton (Wal-Mart) family. There are four or five of them I believe, and from what I've read they are each worth north of 25 billion dollars. I watched a documentary about Wal-Mart once, it showed some of the conditions their factory workers work in over seas. It talked about how Wal-Mart has small apartments (I saw them, you can call them closets) built into the factories so that workers can live and work right on site. The kicker is that even if the worker decides to live elsewhere, Wal-Mart deducts the rent payment from their check anyway. The Walton's have more money than they'll ever know what to do with and they still can't stop themselves from charging rent to people who have literally nothing. The point is, very few people ever get their hands on that carrot. Very few people ever become content with what they have and where they are in life. It's always "if only I had that", that's the thought that drives them. This is what happens when you make your entire life about things that don't matter. The moment you capture something, you immediately want more. It's no way to live. This is why Americans have so much debt, nobody ever learns.

There's no shame in living in a smaller home or driving a used car. Determine what's important to you and go from there, I'm positive you will be far more happy living well within your means, spending more time with your family, and possibly retiring early because you didn't waste your money on crap that you'll ultimately never care about anyway, than you would with the alternative. You'll never find a more honest answer to what's important in life than from someone who is laying on their death bed, it would be wise for you and everyone else to pay attention to what some of these people say.


SackedBySapp

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#31 : June 16, 2014, 07:16:17 PM

Stop wasting font.  The OP never came back.  I think I see why he's having so much trouble with life choices...he's lazy.

WhiskeyBuc

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#32 : June 24, 2014, 10:57:41 AM

Stop wasting font.  The OP never came back.  I think I see why he's having so much trouble with life choices...he's lazy.

Sorry guys. I work graveyard so I'm not very active on the internet. My life tends to be sleeping, family, and trying to get some sun lol. I sincerely appreciate all the advice.

I've signed up for classes next semester at the local community college to finish my general AA (still feel this is useless and a waste of money). I've applied to several internships ranging from the Bucs training camp intern to a startup brewing company. I also was studying ASVAB for a time, but was told by my brother-in-law (navy seal) that they wouldn't take me because I have a medical history of depression and anxiety.

Escobar06: I agree with not striving just for wealth and materialism. I'm just striving to be able to live comfortably without worrying about bills and loans lol.

The Anti-Java: I love football and brewing. Applied to Bucs internship and got this e-mail

"Dear Applicant,
Thank you for applying for the 2014 Tampa Bay Buccaneers Training Camp Assistant position. We appreciate your interest in our organization.
Although we were impressed with your qualifications, we have decided not to move your application forward. However, we greatly appreciate your interest in working with us and we wish you the best in your future job search.
Sincerely,
The Tampa Bay Buccaneers"




I think I'm going to try and form some kind of business now that I have 12K and a decent credit score. Anything to quit working retail lol



The Anti-Java

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#33 : June 24, 2014, 10:17:20 PM



The Anti-Java: I love football and brewing. Applied to Bucs internship and got this e-mail

"Dear Applicant,
Thank you for applying for the 2014 Tampa Bay Buccaneers Training Camp Assistant position. We appreciate your interest in our organization.
Although we were impressed with your qualifications, we have decided not to move your application forward. However, we greatly appreciate your interest in working with us and we wish you the best in your future job search.
Sincerely,
The Tampa Bay Buccaneers"




Interesting.  But at least you gave it a shot. That is more than a lot of people would do.



Redwave

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#34 : June 25, 2014, 09:44:13 AM

Though I almost skipped by this thread, I found it to be a good read, minus the Java stuff.  You really did get some great advice from a few posters.  Escobar's post was a bit of a surprise.  If you don't think about those things up front, you'll be much more prone to learning the hard way, which is often very avoidable.  I'll add this:   1)   Finish the degree despite how you feel about it.  It will matter in terms of opportunity, and opportunity is really all we can ask for.  If nothing else, the degree will show that you have it in you to finish something, and that's very significant.  2)  The fact that you've saved as you have is something to be proud of and is key to financial independence.  Look at a chart showing how your money can grow with compounded interest.  Getting started early is huge.  You're also young enough to take financial risks, but try to make sure risks are well calculated, that there is a good market for what you're offering and that you're willing to make the sacrifices necessary to get the business going and maintain it.

bucinnj

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#35 : June 25, 2014, 02:32:41 PM

I had a lot of fun when I was 23 but even still I didn't appreciate being THAT young enough.

There is a lot of good advice within this thread.  Find something you love to do and do that. 

Good luck and enjoy the discovery!

Turn the page.

Dolorous Jason

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#36 : June 26, 2014, 07:11:04 AM

Just do what Lord Beavis does. Get an entry level job cleaning off tables at McDonald's and then tell the government you deserve to be as paid as much as a doctor does.

What is your point? I was wrong? Ok. You win. I was wrong.

           
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