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#30 : April 08, 2007, 09:12:29 PM

LCD>DLP. 1080p>anything else. I have seen the difference. A projected image (with light loss) can never be as good as a direct display. The DLP chips are designed for 720/768 and most create 1080p as opposed to displaying it. It is rendered. I have to respectfully disagree. Why would you want to watch your DLP bulb gradually lose it's intensity and then replace? If DLP is better, why are they thousands cheaper per size?

http://www.dlptvreview.com/dlptv/dlptelevision.html


I have seen bench tests where DLPs actually out last LCDs.  DLPs are currently cheaper for the larger screen sizes because the LCD technology is only just catching up.   

A Potential Problem with LCD: Long Term Image Degradation

Texas Instruments recently released the results of a lab test conducted last year which highlighted a failure mode in LCD technology that does not exist with DLP. Given enough time, it appears that LCD panels, primarily those in the blue channel, will degrade, causing shifts in color balance and a reduction of overall contrast. The test did not include a large enough array of test units to draw any conclusions about anticipated rates of degradation under normal operating conditions.

However it is possible that those who invest in an LCD projector may find that eventually the LCD panel and polarizer in the blue channel may need replacement.


I have read reports from the global broadcast conference in Europe last year where they compared 720p/1080i/1080p.  Using uncompressed signals the results didn't actually produce a clear winner.  However when the signals were compressed the 1080i and 720p both had a superior picture to the 1080p because the decompression struggled with the data involved.  The average compressed 1080p signal uses 28mbps, and it doesn't uncompress well.  At this time there isn't a single broadcaster in the world with plans to broadcast in 1080p. 

Of course 1080p is theoretically better, but in real life you are never really going to see the benefit.  Until everyone is on fiber optic cables there will not be enough bandwidth to use 1080p. Maybe when you buy your next TV in 5 or 6 years the 1080p will be worth worrying about but it definitely isn’t today. 

HD was developed to bring down the recommended viewing distance to 2.5-3.5 of the height of the TV.  The old format only supports a viewing distance of about 5 times the height of the TV.  If you are sitting 10-12 feet away watching a 42inch wide screen negate many of the advantages of HD.  A 42-inch wide screen is only the same size as a 36 inch 4:3 TV. 




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#31 : April 08, 2007, 09:22:36 PM

So anyway, what about my TV?  Does it seem easy to fix?



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#32 : April 08, 2007, 09:25:47 PM

So anyway, what about my TV? Does it seem easy to fix?

Check the cost of new bulbs on the Internet.  If they aren't too expensive see if a local repair company will come out and see if it is the bulbs.

If you can delay the purchase of a new TV a year or two the benefits will be huge.  Once laser TV hits the markets they will not be able to give DLP/LCD/Plasmas away.  They had them on display at the comsumer show in Vegas and the first ones will hit the market later this year:

The laser technology advocates claim that the technology will allow displays with a richer, more vibrant color palette than the conventional plasma, LCD or CRT displays.[3]

Lots of advantages:

be half the weight and cost of Plasma or LCD displays
require around 25% of the power required by Plasma or LCD displays
be very thin like Plasma and LCD displays are today
have a very wide colour gamut
have a 50,000 hour life

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#33 : April 08, 2007, 09:32:06 PM

So from what I described does it sound like the bulbs?



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#34 : April 08, 2007, 09:36:26 PM

So from what I described does it sound like the bulbs?

Not sure Ray.  This link has some info and tests:  http://www.alltvlamps.com/?gclid=CPraneXAtIsCFSJnUAodYG2PvA

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#35 : April 08, 2007, 09:48:36 PM

So anyway, what about my TV? Does it seem easy to fix?

No TV guy will give you a straight answer and it's 75 to 100 bucks for the service call to take off the back panel and look. 35-60 an hr to run the diagnostics. Plus parts,plus labor-- if it's a bulb mine was 275 on a Panny 60". If yours is the same light intensity as before you may have had a mirror shift if all the convergences are off. Your TV should have something to adjust the blue greens and reds to see if the mirrors are misalligned- something to do with convergence I bleieve-- look the manual up on line. If not may just be the bulb. if it's just the bulb it is easy enough to replace yourself with the manual.

Bay-- believe it or not standing back from the TV I did not see that much difference in the true 1080p from 1080i. I am an average consumer and can tell you that I saw some better clarity but it was not jaw dropping to where I said I have to have it. Obviously you didn't either. Especially when the cost is much much higher and as MJS said no one in the known free world broadcasts in it or plans to anytime soon. So while you can watch some DVD's in it-- you dont get much else and you have to have a 1080P HD DVD player which is much much more expenisve. I'll wait for the broadcasting technology to catch up.




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#36 : April 08, 2007, 09:54:54 PM

I'll wait for the broadcasting technology to catch up.

Bandwidth is a major hurdle for 1080p.  Coaxial/Cable can only carry around 50mbs and that need splitting between Internet, phone and other TV users in the home.  Broadcasters need any spare bandwidth for money making products like pay-for-view etc.  Until most home have fiber optic feeds there is little chance of 1080p becoming the norm.

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#37 : April 08, 2007, 09:59:32 PM

What you are trying to say is that a person with Blu-ray and a 1080p television is not seeing a better picture ??? Then why would they bother making it? Why is it the future?  The real world is me looking at it and saying that looks horrible and this one does not.  Just like I did.  DLP stands for Didn't List specs Properly. I wanted pixel for pixel. Just like everyone will.  Not created 1080p.  Hear me now and believe me later. A 1080i signal is 1920 by 1080. A 1080p signal is 1920 by 1080. Only a true 1080p television can broadcast a 1080i signal without rendering. That is it in a nutshell.

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#38 : April 08, 2007, 10:31:24 PM

Well I tried doing the auto convergence thing on my tv.  It kept saying I had too much light.  I covered the tv with a blanket and it still said too much light.



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#39 : April 08, 2007, 10:32:35 PM

What you are trying to say is that a person with Blu-ray and a 1080p television is not seeing a better picture ??? Then why would they bother making it?

It is being made and marketed to drive sales.  The TV industry was really struggling but now people are buying into the flat panels and HD they are going through a boom.

. Hear me now and believe me later. A 1080i signal is 1920 by 1080. A 1080p signal is 1920 by 1080. Only a true 1080p television can broadcast a 1080i signal without rendering. That is it in a nutshell.

1080p is insignificance right now because no one is planning transmitting in 1080p.  If you have a HUGE TV(around 120 inch) and you feed it 1080p though Blue-Ray you will see the difference, but that only represents a tiny percentage of TV viewers.  So once again 1080p is in significant.

Some broadcasters will go with 1080i but many will stick with 720p because that is all that most people will need.  That takes us nicely to “rendering”, which you keep harping on.  If you have a 1080p TV and the signal is 1080i or 720p, your TV will render/up scale the missing information to make a 1080p picture.  Some TVs do this OK but many don’t and you actually end up with an inferior picture than watching it in 720p.


http://televisionbroadcast.com/articles/article_1467.shtml






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#40 : April 08, 2007, 10:41:57 PM

This is one of the better articles on TV resolutions:  http://forum.ecoustics.com/bbs/messages/34579/284986.html

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#41 : April 09, 2007, 11:06:56 PM

Guys I bought a Samsung HL-S5687W 56" 1080p DLP HDTV  around last Oct. Most reviews even today rave about this set. I give it a 5 out of 5. Most say 4.5 out of 5. I have a PS3 connected through HDMI and play Blu-Ray movies in 1080p and the picture is so awesome. I can't even watch movies on HBOHD or ShowHD anymore. The DirecTV bandwith is so low (around 9-14 mbps).  This DLP has a Game Mode which speeds up the sets internal processor for more accurate lines and edges. I play Gran Tourismo HD in 1080p and it's unbelievable. This $2,000 tv looked better than most of the $3-$4,000 sets I was comparing it to. You can't go wrong with this DLP. The factory gaurantees no burn-in so you can play as much or watch cable news as long as you want all day everyday. I would suggest this TV over any comparible LCD sets, because LCD is not as sexy. 1080p with DLP is the future "It's The Mirrors"




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#42 : April 12, 2007, 12:23:44 AM

Yeah, I haven't decided on the living room set yet but I am checking into several different models, and pretty much all formats.  Right now I am looking at a couple DLP's, Plasmas, and LCD's.  A few were listed in this thread, and all seem nice.  I may look into getting a combo deal with this Aquos like you said.



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#43 : April 12, 2007, 12:15:37 AM

Two of my colleague at work are into home theater and networks, and they both had a 32” AQUOS.  When the 50” 1080p came out they both bought one at the same time to get a better deal.  They liked the 32” and both are very happy with the 50”.

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#44 : April 11, 2007, 10:33:20 PM

Any good recommendations on a smaller set, maybe around 32"?  I am going to go ahead and by a set for my bedroom as well, don't need anything big just something around 32 would work. 
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