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: April 10, 2007, 09:18:26 AM

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,264968,00.html

I by no means approve of what Imus did but agree with this article.

Your thoughts.

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#1 : April 10, 2007, 09:19:52 AM

Here is the article:

 Radio jock Don Imus' comments last week regarding the Rutgers women's basketball team were deplorable, there's no arguing that.

However, the notion that he should quit or be fired over those remarks is questionable.

While I'm not defending Imus for comments — not worth repeating here — during a segment on his radio show, I am a little confused over the outrage coming from the likes of the Rev. Al Sharpton, Jesse Jackson and several more who want the man fired, including The National Association of Black Journalists.

Sure, the above-mentioned individuals and groups have spoken out against gangsta-rap stars and the record labels that profit from such "art" — where rap stars refer to women as much worse on a regular basis in music marketed to impressionable young consumers — they never persist to the point where they say Snoop Dog or Diddy or Jay-Z or Russell Simmons should be fired.

Never. And why is that?

And notice how most of the ire about the Imus incident is directed at Imus himself, and not his longtime radio producer Bernard McGuirk. Is that because McGuirk — when he went on to call the game "jigaboos versus the wannabes" — was quoting from Spike Lee's "School Daze," and any uproar directed at McGuirk would be an indictment on one of the country's leading black directors?

I guess we'd have to go to the film archives and excise that scene and speech from all future printings of the film, and a nationwide call to burn any existing copies would be initiated. We'd have Spike Lee VHS bonfires at Blockbusters everywhere.

Highly unlikely.

Imus might be a loud-mouthed jerk — and he most certainly should be punished with either a fine or a suspension, or both — but to be fired would be such a double standard as to only be described as reverse racism.

Sharpton, on his radio show Monday, commented in his opening monologue that what makes Imus' remarks even more deplorable is the fact that he said them on a "mainstream" radio program that features the likes of senators, presidential candidates and evening news anchors.

Is that to suggest that Don Imus should be more responsible than a rap artist or the people who profit from rap music that prominently features mysogynistic lyrics?

For Imus' part, he appeared on Sharpton's radio show Monday, and did not try to defend his remarks. He admitted that what he said was not funny and was wrong.

Sharpton told him to his face that he should be fired. Maybe he should be, but let's face the real facts here. The only thing that will get Imus fired is a decline in ratings, and thus a decline in advertiser revenue for both MSNBC and WFAN radio, the CBS-owned station that produces his daily program.

And until the marketing and proliferation of hate ceases to be profitable, its purveyors will stay employed and in the lap of financial luxury for many more years to come.

It's only a matter of time before Howard Stern's porn stars and lipstick lesbians make their way back to terrestrial radio, as the raucous duo of Opie and Anthony have done after they were banished to unregulated satellite radio airwaves only to make a triumphant (read: profitable) return recently.

To wit, some of the funniest moments in both of the above-mentioned shows are the ones that push the envelope right up to that tipping point, where you can't believe your ears.

The irony is hate is entertaining. It's funny, and Imus has made a long, successful career from it. It's been a long time since the world of big media was Mr. Roger's neighborhood.

And I'm not talking about Eddie Murphy's racy (and racist) "Saturday Night Live" take on that neighborhood either. Then again, his was much funnier, wasn't it?

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#2 : April 10, 2007, 09:57:03 AM

Good point. Sharpton and Jackson are hypocritical. Doesn't make Imus right, though.

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#3 : April 10, 2007, 10:56:09 AM

There has always been others who can  pull off racial or racist jokes,  but his was just not funny, if it was funny I would say big deal,


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#4 : April 10, 2007, 11:00:16 AM

People who get offended by words have very weak minds.  Maybe concentrating on education, parental responsibility, and self-improvement would better serve you, your family, and your community.  Complaining and blaming the most opportunistic society in the history of the world for your problems makes you look foolish.  Look in the mirror.  Most people get out of life what they put into it.

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#5 : April 10, 2007, 11:53:40 AM

Sharpton, on his radio show Monday, commented in his opening monologue that what makes Imus' remarks even more deplorable is the fact that he said them on a "mainstream" radio program that features the likes of senators, presidential candidates and evening news anchors.

Is that to suggest that Don Imus should be more responsible than a rap artist or the people who profit from rap music that prominently features mysogynistic lyrics?

Ummmmm, yes?

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#6 : April 10, 2007, 12:42:39 PM

Sharpton, on his radio show Monday, commented in his opening monologue that what makes Imus' remarks even more deplorable is the fact that he said them on a "mainstream" radio program that features the likes of senators, presidential candidates and evening news anchors.

Is that to suggest that Don Imus should be more responsible than a rap artist or the people who profit from rap music that prominently features mysogynistic lyrics?

Ummmmm, yes?

I don't think so.  Don Imus' audience is predominately adults.  On the other hand, the rap artist's audience is kids and young adults.  I think they should both be responsible but rap artists clearly have more of an impact on impressionable minds.

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#7 : April 10, 2007, 12:53:34 PM

I deplore Imus' statements for obvious reasons. IMHO he should be fired. Al Sharpton & Jesse Jackson are 'Race Merchants'. All bad people who serve no purpose in society. If I never heard their names again it would be too soon.

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#8 : April 10, 2007, 02:52:53 PM

Im trying to figure it who made Al Sharpton so important. Must be Tawana Brawley

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#9 : April 10, 2007, 07:16:26 PM

People who get offended by words have very weak minds.  Maybe concentrating on education, parental responsibility, and self-improvement would better serve you, your family, and your community.  Complaining and blaming the most opportunistic society in the history of the world for your problems makes you look foolish.  Look in the mirror.  Most people get out of life what they put into it.
I would get offended by racial comments, you may not because you have never got the experience it. I agree its socitey but it will take generations for this to end. If I was a player from Rutgurs I would go whip is ___ just because im that type of person.


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#10 : April 10, 2007, 07:28:41 PM

So lets break this down...

You can't make fun of someone's hair now? So I guess blonde jokes are now off limits?

And since when is a "ho" a racial or sexist remark? Look in a thesaurus and words similar are prostitute or slut. Are those words off limits to? Because I've heard many, many people use those words daily.

What if Imus said, "Sluts with short, curly, black hair?" Would that be racist and sexist?

I laughed my head off at the black guy on Hannity and Colmes last night. He said "nappy-headed hos" probably 20 times because he thinks the whole thing is funny and has gotten ridiculous.

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#11 : April 10, 2007, 07:41:14 PM

So lets break this down...

You can't make fun of someone's hair now? So I guess blonde jokes are now off limits?

And since when is a "ho" a racial or sexist remark? Look in a thesaurus and words similar are prostitute or slut. Are those words off limits to? Because I've heard many, many people use those words daily.

What if Imus said, "Sluts with short, curly, black hair?" Would that be racist and sexist?

I laughed my head off at the black guy on Hannity and Colmes last night. He said "nappy-headed hos" probably 20 times because he thinks the whole thing is funny and has gotten ridiculous.

If he had said "spear-chucker" would you be making a case that all Imus was doing was making fun of people that enjoy hunting? You're such a tool. And way to spew you're crap in this thread to avoid having to debate me in the other. And I hate to break this to you but referring to a female as a "ho", "slut", or "whore" is degrading and misogynistic.



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#12 : April 10, 2007, 07:58:39 PM

People who get offended by words have very weak minds. Maybe concentrating on education, parental responsibility, and self-improvement would better serve you, your family, and your community. Complaining and blaming the most opportunistic society in the history of the world for your problems makes you look foolish. Look in the mirror. Most people get out of life what they put into it.
I would get offended by racial comments, you may not because you have never got the experience it. I agree its socitey but it will take generations for this to end. If I was a player from Rutgurs I would go whip is ___ just because im that type of person.

I've experienced people's ignorant comments.  When I was in my early twenties I would get violent but now I realize it is not worth it.  People who spew these insensitive comments do so in order to feel empowered, provoke someone, or a couple of other reasons.  Why would you want to empower the individual?  Why would you allow yourself to be provoked into a physical confrontation?  Why would you allow yourself to feel belittled by an individual that clearly has mental or self=esteem issues?  Whipping someone's butt might make you feel better but it will in no way improve your life.  As a matter of fact, if you get an assault charge it will have negative consequences.  If people stopped reacting to a whole host of offensive comments their use would decline drastically.
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