Welcome, Guest
Pewter Report  >>  Boards  >>  The Red Board (Moderators: 3rd String Kicker, PRPatrol)  >>  Topic: Big 12 Signs That Chris Simms Is Just About Done With The Bucs « previous next »
Page: 1 2

skip

****
Starter

Posts : 503
Offline
: August 16, 2007, 11:50:13 AM

Boid Fink: Simms has had his chance, and I rooted for him like crazy.  Time to move on, IMO

Simms performed well when Griese went down and took us to the playoffs. The following year he looked great during camp practice and appeared to be on his way to being a good if not great QB.  I think the entire team was not prepared to play the regular season based on the lack of work during last years preseason. Every phase of our game stunk, no running game, no passing game, our usually sound defense was average at best. Gruden did not prepare this team to play football in the preseason which included the performence of the offensive line and QB. Gruden pulled the starters early in every preseason game to avoid injury and it backfired on him. Keep Simms and see what he does, I believe the Bucs have to pay him anyway and we don't need cap room.



Guest
#1 : August 14, 2007, 12:18:05 PM

A funny story on Chris Simms

http://www.epiccarnival.com/2007/08/big-12-signs-that-chris-simms-is-just.html

bucsbum

******
Hall of Famer

Posts : 2447
Offline
#2 : August 14, 2007, 12:38:06 PM

there was an interesting interview with Gruden on WDAE at around 11:45 on the 14th about Sims. Gruden seem to insinuate that Sims problems does not stem from any injury so he can’t go on injured reserve but Sims problems are more from the Bucs trying to quicken his release. Grude also referred to Sims performance over the 3 games he played in 2006 and how bad his performance was in those games. Is it possible that Sims problem stems from the Bucs forcing him to change and shorten his throwing motion.

SR/JF I see a big story here you might want to pursue

alldaway

******
Hall of Famer

Posts : 37083
Offline
#3 : August 14, 2007, 12:39:40 PM

Simms throwing motion was still a long windup in 2006.

Simms2Clayton05

*
Practice Squad

Posts : 0
Offline
#4 : August 14, 2007, 01:37:01 PM

hes gone. If gradkowski gets injured or all the sudden starts throwin INTs every play then Simms may be the third stringer. But i dont see that happening.

MiltonMack21

User is on moderator watch listWatched
******
Hall of Famer

Posts : 9254
Offline
#5 : August 14, 2007, 02:42:13 PM

I believe he is gone. He doesn't fit the dink and dunk quick/short throws in this version of the west coast "offense".


Snook

******
Hall of Famer

Posts : 9083
Offline
#6 : August 14, 2007, 04:13:28 PM

"6. Mark Clayton is keeping his distance"

Who's Mark Clayton?


DanTurksGhost

******
Hall of Famer

Posts : 19746
Offline
#7 : August 14, 2007, 04:23:10 PM

There is virtually nothing about Simms that is right for this offense. Never has been. IMO, he was re-signed here for insurance purposes and that's all.

ABuccs Fan

*
Practice Squad

Posts : 0
Offline
#8 : August 14, 2007, 06:30:24 PM

A funny story on Chris Simms

http://www.epiccarnival.com/2007/08/big-12-signs-that-chris-simms-is-just.html
You thought that was funny. The line about the Hostetler jersey got a half a chuckle out of me.

DefenseWins

******
Hall of Famer

Posts : 3918
Offline
#9 : August 14, 2007, 08:11:56 PM

Weeks ago, Allen insisted that there was nothing wrong with Chris's arm.

Today, with Ron and Ian, Gruden corrected one of the hosts saying..."He is healthy, let me be clear on that."

I think that the Bucs are posturing a release of Simms under the scope of performance. He has cleared physicals. There are no comparative situations for Chris's recovery. The Bucs look at him as healthy. An unhealthy Chris means an expensive Chris to release.

My prediction: Chris will be released, and The Bucs will try to escape any type of injury settlement





It is a new day in TAMPA BAY!    GO BUCS!!

BornaBuc47

******
Hall of Famer

Posts : 2893
Offline
#10 : August 15, 2007, 12:59:10 PM

Weeks ago, Allen insisted that there was nothing wrong with Chris's arm.

Today, with Ron and Ian, Gruden corrected one of the hosts saying..."He is healthy, let me be clear on that."

I think that the Bucs are posturing a release of Simms under the scope of performance. He has cleared physicals. There are no comparative situations for Chris's recovery. The Bucs look at him as healthy. An unhealthy Chris means an expensive Chris to release.

My prediction: Chris will be released, and The Bucs will try to escape any type of injury settlement

This is exactly what I hate about the Gruden/Allen led Buccaneers. Simms lost his splean during a game less than a year ago and now they want to try and say he's 100% healthy. You've got to be kidding me. It's obvious that he's not fully recovered from that injury.

From 12 Pro Bowlers to 0-We got hosed alright


ABuccs Fan

*
Practice Squad

Posts : 0
Offline
#11 : August 15, 2007, 01:05:48 PM

 This health information is licensed from EBSCO Publishing Health Library. More
[X] CLOSE
Many of the health resources provided on this Web site are written or produced by Brigham and Women's health care providers. However, to make a more comprehensive health library available, Brigham and Women's Hospital has licensed the EBSCO Publishing Health Library. All Health Library content is written by experienced medical writers and is independently reviewed by medically credentialed experts. Each article undergoes a rigorous, multi-layered review process before it is posted to the Web
Splenectomy

En Espa�ol (Spanish Version)
Definition

Surgical removal of the spleen. The spleen is an organ located in the upper left part of the abdomen behind the stomach. The spleen filters blood to remove bacteria, parasites, and other organisms that can cause infection. It also makes and stores blood.
Abdominal Organs
Nucleus factsheet image

Copyright � 2005 Nucleus Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. www.nucleusinc.com
Parts of the Body Involved

Spleen
Reasons for Procedure

    * Severe trauma to or rupture of the spleen
    * Enlargement of the spleen (splenomegaly)
    * Blood disorders, such as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and hereditary spherocytosis, elliptocytosis, and thalassemia
    * Myelofibrosis (abnormal formation of fibrous tissue in the bone marrow)
    * Splenic abscess
    * Ruptured splenic artery
    * Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma
    * Diseased spleen due to a disorder, such as leukemia, HIV, Felty's syndrome, and Banti's disease
    * Benign or cancerous tumors
    * Thrombosis (blood clot) in the splenic vein, which can occur with esophageal varices
    * Liver disease, specifically cirrhosis
    * Spleen transplant rejection

Risk Factors for Complications During the Procedure

    * Obesity
    * Smoking
    * Poor nutrition
    * Recent or chronic illness
    * Diabetes
    * Old age
    * Pre-existing heart or lung disease

What to Expect

Prior to Procedure

Your doctor will likely do the following:

    * Physical Exam
    * Blood and Urine Tests
    * Review of Medications
    * X-rays of Abdomen
    * CT Scan � a type of x-ray that uses a computer to make pictures of the inside of the body
    * Possibly, Ultrasound � a test that uses sound waves to visualize the inside of the body
    * Possibly, Electrocardiogram (ECG, EKG) � a test that records the heart's activity by measuring electrical currents through the heart muscle
    * Technetium-99m sulfur colloid imaging to evaluate spleen enlargement
    * Studies to determine rate of destruction of red blood cells and/or platelets via radioactive tagging
    * Immunizations against pneumococcal and meningococcal infections (without your spleen you'll be more susceptible to these kinds of infections)
    * If necessary, treatment to correct low red blood cells or platelets.
    * If necessary, treatment for any current infections.

During Procedure � Anesthesia, airway tube placed in windpipe, IV fluids, medications, blood

Anesthesia � General

Description of the Procedure - The spleen can be removed through a classic, open incision or through laparoscopic surgery.

Classic, open incision: An incision is made in the abdomen over the spleen, and the skin and muscles are pulled back. The spleen is located, and the blood vessels to and around the spleen, including the splenic artery and vein, are clamped or tied off, so that the organ is no longer attached. Moist sponges may be placed in the abdomen to absorb some of the blood and fluid. The spleen is removed and any bleeding is controlled with a cautery (a hot instrument or electric current that controls bleeding by burning the tissue) or by tying blood vessels.

The wound is cleaned, the muscles and skin are closed with stitches or staples, and a gauze dressing is applied. The stitches or staples can usually be removed about one week after surgery.

Laparoscopic removal: A small incision is made in the abdomen through which a laparoscope is inserted. This is a thin, lighted tube with a small camera that allows the surgeon to view the internal structures on a video monitor. Carbon dioxide gas is infused into the abdomen, which inflates the abdomen and gives the surgeon more room to work.

Two or three additional incisions are made in the abdomen through which the surgeon inserts specialized instruments. The spleen is located, isolated, and blood vessels to the spleen are cut and tied off. The spleen is then rotated and removed. If the spleen has been ruptured, the abdomen is examined to check for any other injured organs or blood vessels. If needed, further surgery may be performed at this time. The incisions are closed with stitches are covered with surgical tape.

After Procedure � Blood tests and laboratory exam of removed tissue. You may require a blood transfusion.

How Long Will It Take?

45 � 60 minutes

Will It Hurt?

Anesthesia prevents pain during the procedure, but you may have pain from the incisions for a few days after the surgery. If necessary, your doctor can prescribe pain medication to relieve this discomfort.

Possible Complications:

    * Infection
    * Excess bleeding
    * Incisional hernia
    * Deep vein blood clots
    * Pneumonia
    * Pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas)
    * Thromboembolism (blockage of a blood vessel caused by a blood clot), especially in older adults
    * Collapsed lung

Average Hospital Stay: 2�4 days

Postoperative Care: - It's important to follow your doctor's insturctions for postoperative care. Instructions that are commonly given after a splenectomy include:

    * Shower as usual, but avoid baths until the incision has completely healed. Replace any wet dressings with clean, dry ones.
    * Take only non-aspirin containing medications for minor pain.
    * Avoid vigorous activity (exercise, heavy lifting, etc) as well as driving for about six weeks or as directed by your doctor.

Outcome

Recovery time may vary according to the extent of the injuries and any underlying disease or condition. On average, allow about 4-6 weeks for complete healing.


Splenectomy should allow your body to produce a normal number of red blood cells and platelets; if you've had pain from an enlarged spleen, this should improve.

Other cells in the body will take over the functions of the removed spleen. However, without a spleen, you are at an increased risk for the development of serious infections, especially those caused by pneumococcal bacteria. Unless you have already had it, you should have a pneumonia vaccination and you will need a booster in 5�10 years. Children who have this operation may be given preventative antibiotics until age 16.

Always let any doctor who is treating you know that you do not have a spleen. Carry a national splenectomy card, which most hospital hematology departments can give you. When traveling, take special precautions against malaria and other infections that can cause a threat.
Call Your Doctor If Any of the Following Occurs

    * Signs of infection, including fever and chills
    * Redness, swelling, increasing pain, excessive bleeding, or discharge from the incision site
    * Cough, shortness of breath, chest pain, or severe nausea or vomiting
    * New, unexplained symptoms

RESOURCES:

American Academy of Family Physicians

http://familydoctor.org

National Institutes of Health

http://www.nih.gov

References:

The Cleveland Clinic website. Available at: http://www.clevelandclinic.org/.

Lymphoma Association website. Available at: http://www.lymphoma.org.uk/.

Sabiston DC Jr. Textbook of Surgery, 17th ed. Philadelphia, PA: WB Saunders Co.; 2004.

Last reviewed November 2006 by Rosalyn Carson-DeWitt, MD

Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

Copyright � 2007 EBSCO Publishing. All rights reserved.

ABuccs Fan

*
Practice Squad

Posts : 0
Offline
#12 : August 15, 2007, 01:08:00 PM

LMAO at the Gruden and Allen haters drudging up fallacies looking for excuses to hate.

DanTurksGhost

******
Hall of Famer

Posts : 19746
Offline
#13 : August 15, 2007, 01:12:21 PM

This is exactly what I hate about the Gruden/Allen led Buccaneers. Simms lost his splean during a game less than a year ago and now they want to try and say he's 100% healthy. You've got to be kidding me. It's obvious that he's not fully recovered from that injury.

You bashers are all alike.

"My body is definitely 100 percent healed."
- Chris Simms, 8/3/07

It must be a Gruden/Allen conspiracy.

BornaBuc47

******
Hall of Famer

Posts : 2893
Offline
#14 : August 15, 2007, 01:33:15 PM

You coolaiders are all alike. I'm sure you still think Gradkowski is the answer because Gruden put him in. How about Griese? Rob Johnson? Players are going to say they're healthy. Simms wants to play football. Being healthy is one thing but being football healthy is another. It's obvious that his football health is suffering because his mechanics are off. He already said his elbow pain was from trying to stay away from using his body to make throws so he used his arm only and it started to hurt. I'm sure I can dig up quotes of many players saying they were 100% healthy following an injury who were suffering the same problems. Culpepper comes to mind.

"I love Jon Gruden so much it hurts."
-DanTurksGhost, Everyday

From 12 Pro Bowlers to 0-We got hosed alright

Page: 1 2
Pewter Report  >>  Boards  >>  The Red Board (Moderators: 3rd String Kicker, PRPatrol)  >>  Topic: Big 12 Signs That Chris Simms Is Just About Done With The Bucs « previous next »
:

Hide Tools Show Tools