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yuccaneers

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: September 06, 2008, 06:52:40 PM

"It's overload blitzes, zone blitzes that won the Giants the Super Bowl, or was a big reason," coach Jon Gruden said. "They profited greatly from that scheme. Normally, the last year, the people say, 'Hey, what are they doing that's so good? Maybe we ought to take a look at it?' "

"You're going to send four guys out in a route? Let's see, if four guys are out in a route, you have six blockers," Gruden said. "Okay, let's bring four to this side and break that protection down and smash the quarterback or make him throw it hot. It's not a perfect science."

"The potential for that is always going to be there," Gruden said. "We feel good about our four corners. We feel good about our four safeties, honestly. We've got eight athletic guys who can not only play our traditional zone scheme, but they can do a lot of things. And they're not only capable blitzers and willing tacklers, so there's some deception that maybe we can use."


This could be, one of the many reasons why, the Bucs will use Sabby alot more along with the main reasons why the team drafted Talib who excels in man coverage.


In Football, RESPECT is never given freely by your opponent. It must be TAKEN from them...VIOLENTLY

Great players cost a lot of money but help win games. High-priced players - a byproduct of poorly run front offices with bad scouting departments - only cost a lot of money.
"Our greatest glory consists not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall."
Oliver Goldsmith

yuccaneers

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#1 : September 06, 2008, 07:03:33 PM

Links to some pretty good blitz packages just in case you see something Sunday you havent seen before out of the Buccaneers defense

Eagles Zone Blitz

Redskins Zone Blitz Greg Williams

USC 4-3 under Blitz

Zone Blitz

Zone Blitz Explained

In Football, RESPECT is never given freely by your opponent. It must be TAKEN from them...VIOLENTLY

Great players cost a lot of money but help win games. High-priced players - a byproduct of poorly run front offices with bad scouting departments - only cost a lot of money.
"Our greatest glory consists not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall."
Oliver Goldsmith

BucsRunShit

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#2 : September 06, 2008, 07:08:31 PM

I love our secondary.

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SR's Pick-By-Pick Analysis
ROUND 6 - FLORIDA STATE LB GENO HAYES
"What a waste of a pick... Can you tell me how Geno Hayes is going to make this team.."

yuccaneers

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#3 : September 06, 2008, 07:23:19 PM

Coaching defensive football has taken on a whole new look in recent years with the advent of the �Fire Zone� or what is popularly referred to as the �Zone Blitz.� These schemes, first utilized by several NFL teams in the late 1980s and early 1990s, allow defensive coaches the capability to send five rushers (and in some cases six) while still being able to stay in a zone coverage shell behind the blitz. This scheme first evolved to help defenders take away the offense�s ability to throw the �Hot Read� pass route; a quick inside or short throw that is dependent upon a receiver recognizing the blitz and then replacing the blitzing defender and enabling the quarterback to get the ball off quickly (See Diagrams 1 and 2).


Diagram 1. Outside hot read vs.
perimeter blitz


Diagram 2. Inside hot red vs.
interior blitz

As Zone Blitz, or what we call �Fire Zone� schemes, have evolved, it has become even more important to teach the underneath coverage defenders the proper mechanics and fundamentals. The purpose is to be able to deny the short routes and allow the frontage pressure time to get to the quarterback and either sack him or disrupt his throwing rhythm.

There are basically two coverage shells we like to employ in our Fire Zone packages. The first is �ORANGE� coverage, which is a three deep, three under zone, while the other is �SCARLET� coverage, which is a two deep, four under shell. We are not a defense who will send six rushers in our Zone Blitz schemes as we feel that it would weaken us in the under zones and thus give the quarterback too many throwing seams to defeat the blitz and the coverage (See Diagram 3).


Diagram 3. 30-Storm-Orange vs.
one back/pro

That same blitz with �Scarlet� coverage is seen in the next diagram (See Diagram 4).

Note how we like to SLANT or SLICE our frontage people and CROSSFIRE our blitzers to help confuse the protection schemes of the offense. In our game planning, we like to go into each and every game with at least three to five Fire Zone schemes available, depending on the type of offensive scheme we are seeing from each opponent.


Diagram 4. 30-Storm Scarlet (quarters or halves)
vs. one-back/pro

The purpose of this article is to show how we teach our underneath coverage to deny the hot read routes and help our pressure to make big plays for our defense. In our �ORANGE� coverage scheme, we utilize three deep defenders playing normal deep third coverage. The three underneath coverage defenders are defined as �HOTS� (two widest underneath defenders) and �HOLE� (inside defender) (See Diagram 5).


Diagram 5. 'Hot' (outside) and 'Hole'
(inside) underneath defenders

We want our underneath coverage to deny the routes from the INSIDE-OUT, forcing the QB to have to make the longer, outside or wide throw to defeat the blitz. Our �HOT� defenders are instructed to play their zone in this progression: (1) SEAM, (2) CURL (3) FLAT (See Diagram 6).


Diagram 6. Seam/curl/flat zones defined

Quite simply, we will take the route that shows first and play it like a man-to-man coverage as it hits my zone. The next diagram (See Diagram 7) shows the �HOT� defender playing the SEAM route, or inside vertical route. We want the defender to JAM or DISRUPT the receiver coming vertical by punching his inside or near number with his own inside arm, turning his body into the receiver and playing tight to his inside hip, taking away the inside throwing lane. In essence, this becomes like a MAN TURN (outside) for a secondary defender. We will carry this route DEEP with the HOT defender just like man coverage as it is the most dangerous route versus the Fire Zone and it is the easiest throw for the quarterback to complete. We also like to play this route slightly BEHIND the receiver as we know we have help deep and if the quarterback tries to force the throw, the deep third defender can BRACKET the receiver with the HOT defender.(See Diagram 8).



In Football, RESPECT is never given freely by your opponent. It must be TAKEN from them...VIOLENTLY

Great players cost a lot of money but help win games. High-priced players - a byproduct of poorly run front offices with bad scouting departments - only cost a lot of money.
"Our greatest glory consists not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall."
Oliver Goldsmith

yuccaneers

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#4 : September 06, 2008, 07:13:42 PM

[q]When Tom Coughlin introduced Steve Spagnulo as the Giants new Defensive Coordinator, a year ago, he made particular mention of his familiarity with the Fire Zone philosophy. He didn't say Fire Zone blitz, even though he could expect it to be inferred. What he was referring to was more than scheme, it was a mindset which recognizes that pressure on the opposing Quarterback has become essential to successful pass defense, and with it to overall success on defense.

But what does Fire Zone mean in more specific and practical terms; how does it work? The first element of the Fire Zone is to rush more defensive players than the offense has blockers to account for them. It can involve both numbers and location. Almost always, it involves rushing more than four defensive players which means at least five whether playing a 4-3 or 3-4 front. And that constitutes a blitz.

However, that's not all which is involved. Its essence is to blitz unpredictably with linebackers, defensive backs and combinations of both while keeping the Secondary from being undermanned and exposed by dropping one or more Dlinemen into zone pass coverage.

Dropping linemen into zone pass coverage often mean zone coverage behind them, but not always. There may still be man-coverage, and even a double on the opponents best receiver. It does seem. however, that the Giants most often play a three deep zone behind their blitzes which they employ on average about 12-15 times a game.

Whatever shell is played behind the blitz, it is important that the rushers get at least enough pressure to hurry the QB, and that those who aren't rushing clog the passing lanes, and try to identify the hot receiver.

So, we have blitz (rushing five or more players) and zone blitz ( Dlinemen dropping into coverage), where then does the term, Fire Zone come in? Although not precisely defined, it is considered to mean creating a fire zone or clear path for a blitzer to the QB by overloading one side of a blocking scheme. That may be accomplished not only by attacking with a second blitzer, but also by stunting and looping Dlineman so that they don't rush straight ahead from their original position but overload one side of the offensive protection.

While strictly speaking the term, Fire Zone means blitzing and a propensity to blitz- not all the time, but at almost any time, in almost any situation- certain of its fundamental elements have been employed by the Giants without actually blitzing. For example, it's not uncommon when the Giants are playing their Four Aces package to see them stunt or loop Dlineman while dropping one into coverage and adding a Linebacker to the rush often through a gap vacated by a Dlineman. �Only four rushers, but with a look that can be as confusing to the QB as if there were more. Any extra fraction of a second he takes to figure out that it's only four is to the defense's advantage.

I suppose we could sum it up by saying that the Fire Zone philosophy is to aggressively apply pass rush pressure on the opposing Quarterback by employing extra rushers from any and all angles at any time with the conviction that the more a quarterback is attacked, the more are the chances he is going to be hit, and the more he is hit, the more innacurate he'll become.

How effective were they in attacking? �How about a season with 53 sacks, 61 knockdowns, and 45 hurries. That doesn't include what they did in postseason including the Super Bowl when they sacked and hit Brady a combined 23 times. Philosophically sound it would seem.[/q]

LINK


In Football, RESPECT is never given freely by your opponent. It must be TAKEN from them...VIOLENTLY

Great players cost a lot of money but help win games. High-priced players - a byproduct of poorly run front offices with bad scouting departments - only cost a lot of money.
"Our greatest glory consists not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall."
Oliver Goldsmith

yuccaneers

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#5 : September 06, 2008, 07:28:59 PM

Our HOT defenders KEY the second widest receiver or Number Two as they take their initial drops.

Versus a CURL route by Number Two (or a short HOOK route), our HOT defender must play the upfield release by Number Two the same as a SEAM, except now when the receiver cuts or breaks back, we will settle on his inside number between the receiver and the quarterback. As he makes his break or stops and turns, the HOT defender now wants to drive his inside shoulder across and in front of the receiver, squaring his body to the line of scrimmage and denying his route to the quarterback�s vision point (See Diagram 9).


Diagram 8. "Hot' defender vs.
seam route w/deep 1/3 help


Diagram 9. 'Hot' defender vs.
curl or short hook route


Diagram 10. 'Hot' defender vs.
flat or short out route

The next diagram (See Diagram 10) shows the HOT defender playing the FLAT or SHORT OUT cut. Once the defender reads Number Two gaining width and running to the flat, we want him to drive hard off his inside foot, breaking at a 45-degree angle and taking his path through the upfield shoulder of the receiver. Once again, we are playing this the same way we teach our defensive corners and safeties to play the SQUARE OUT route in man-to-man coverage. We want the HOT defender to drive for the interception point, thrusting his inside arm and shoulder across the bow of the receiver, while his outside arm and shoulder come through the near number on the receiver�s back. In this way, if we miss the interception, we are still in position to make the tackle for a short gain. A key coaching point here is to tell the HOT defender to gain width and drive hard to the outside as soon as Number Two gets width! Remember once again � YOU HAVE HELP DEEP!


Diagram 13. Hole defender vs.
#3 middle or inside hook


Diagram 14. Hole defender vs.
#3 and #2 switch routes with
'Banjo' call flat or short
out route

Should our underneath defenders key set up to block or not release, we ask that defender to zone off by first gaining DEPTH not width! (See Diagram 15). In this way he can still break up on any DELAY route or he can ZONE OFF and help on inside routes breaking towards the middle of the field.


Diagram 15. #3 sets up to block-hole
defender deepens and zones
off-help inside

A good way to teach the mechanics of the underneath coverage in the FIRE ZONE schemes is to have your secondary coach work some man-to-man techniques with your linebackers. This enables them to learn the proper ZONE and MAN TURNS needed to execute their coverages in the FIRE ZONE schemes.

The key to playing good zone blitz coverage is to take away the short throws and that involves good mechanics and technique by the underneath defenders. By identifying their coverage areas, knowing where their help is, and denying the quarterbacks throwing lanes, the FIRE ZONE can create big plays for the defense and give the offense fits!

This article was written by Dale Sprague who has over 30 years of coaching experience on the high school and college level. He has coached at Springfield High School (IL) for five years and has also coached at RPI, Middlebury College, Saint Lawrence University, Wabash College and Blackburn College. At Blackburn, Sprague became the winningest coach in the school's history and helped coach the Battlin' Beavers to their only conference title in 1996. He graduated from American International University in 1976 and received a Masers in Education from SUNY at Albany in 1978.

In Football, RESPECT is never given freely by your opponent. It must be TAKEN from them...VIOLENTLY

Great players cost a lot of money but help win games. High-priced players - a byproduct of poorly run front offices with bad scouting departments - only cost a lot of money.
"Our greatest glory consists not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall."
Oliver Goldsmith

dmajik85

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#6 : September 06, 2008, 07:37:39 PM

It'd be awesome to see some new wrinkles in the D... and, I also love our secondary talent.

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#7 : September 06, 2008, 07:45:57 PM

everyone listen to coach yuc
make sure you know your responsibilities, execute and we'll be fine!


yuccaneers

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#8 : September 06, 2008, 08:37:42 PM

Here are the two key ingredients needed to mimic the New York defense:
Three versatile defensive ends

When the ends engage the offensive linemen as rushers, for one split second, and then turn and drop into pass-coverage zones, the blitzer (linebacker or defensive back) is through the line before the blocker can readjust to the real rusher. The Giants featured Michael Strahan and Osi Umenyiora on the outside and Justin Tuck on the inside over a guard. They could all drop as well as rush. A linebacker would show blitz, giving the Patriots the idea that the receiver on the blitz side was "hot," and Brady would look to throw hot right away. As he set to throw, Umenyiora would drop and take the hot receiver away, forcing Brady to go elsewhere. And, by then, Strahan or Tuck would get to the quarterback.
A three-deep zone

Behind that defensive front full of "jokers," or hybrid players, the Giants played a lot of three-deep zone to prevent the big pass that is so prevalent when teams blitz from man-to-man schemes. With Randy Moss on the field, the secondary was going to play a soft deep coverage and then come up to make tackles after short completions -- if Brady had the time to get the pass off.

LINK

In Football, RESPECT is never given freely by your opponent. It must be TAKEN from them...VIOLENTLY

Great players cost a lot of money but help win games. High-priced players - a byproduct of poorly run front offices with bad scouting departments - only cost a lot of money.
"Our greatest glory consists not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall."
Oliver Goldsmith

yuccaneers

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#9 : September 06, 2008, 08:42:10 PM

The more you read about it the more you can see the Bucs had a plan heading into the off-season on defense with the free agent signing of players like Wilkerson, Douglas, Wilson the drafting of Talib to try and copy or at the very least install some new wrinkles to help the pass rush out greatly this coming season

In Football, RESPECT is never given freely by your opponent. It must be TAKEN from them...VIOLENTLY

Great players cost a lot of money but help win games. High-priced players - a byproduct of poorly run front offices with bad scouting departments - only cost a lot of money.
"Our greatest glory consists not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall."
Oliver Goldsmith



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#10 : September 06, 2008, 09:24:16 PM

Would be a great for the Bucs to use that. We actually have talented DBs who can cover guys. The Giants really didnt have that.

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#11 : September 07, 2008, 10:22:36 AM

    We have the best quality depth on defense (probably not 1st stringers, though) we've ever had, IMO. Kiffin can gives guys a blow without losing much with his replacement. He can come up with a slew of personnel packages to confuse the opponent. We just got a really talented group on the D side of the ball ;D.
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