Welcome, Guest
Pewter Report  >>  Boards  >>  The Red Board (Moderators: 3rd String Kicker, PRPatrol)  >>  Topic: Bounty Bowl Discussion « previous next »
Page: 1 ... 4 5 6

nitey

*
Hall of Famer
******
Posts : 3420
Offline
« #75 : March 07, 2012, 08:18:50 PM »

For all those that defend this issue by saying that everyone does it or that bounties don't make a difference, would this scenario have changed your mind?

What if during that Championship game, Brett was so injured during one of those hits that he died (think Chris Sims here) and then it came out that the Saints were deliberately trying to injure him? Would that have made a difference in your opinion? Put your feelings about Brett aside for a moment, and think about it. And if you don't like Brett Farve, throw in whomever your favorite player would be. Would there be outrage? Do you think a trial defense would use a 'well everyone does it' defense? I'm not trying to be naive here, but does anyone think Tony Dungy allowed this at any place he coached? And if not, can we also make an assumption that perhaps NOT everyone does do it? I also suspect law enforcement would have a much different view.

Football, as has already been stated is a violent game, there is no reason to celebrate an injury with a cash bonus. I don't have a problem with paying out money for sacks, interceptions, forced fumbles or even a good play. But putting a bounty on someone's head is just wrong in so many ways. Too many promising careers are derailed by injury, asking your players to play in such a way as to create a injury to a talented player just so you have a better chance to win A GAME is tragic.

Success is when Skill meets OpportunityFailure is when Fantasy meets Reality

Dolorous Jason

******
Hall of Famer

Posts : 16948
Offline
« #76 : March 07, 2012, 08:27:47 PM »

For all those that defend this issue by saying that everyone does it or that bounties don't make a difference, would this scenario have changed your mind?

Football, as has already been stated is a violent game, there is no reason to celebrate an injury with a cash bonus. I don't have a problem with paying out money for sacks, interceptions, forced fumbles or even a good play. But putting a bounty on someone's head is just wrong in so many ways. Too many promising careers are derailed by injury, asking your players to play in such a way as to create a injury to a talented player just so you have a better chance to win A GAME is tragic.
Great Post. I agree .  I'm suprised so many people don't understand  why this is a big deal.

"Everyone does it"  and  "It doesn't result in more injuries anyway" are both piss poor rationalizations, IMO . Cash rewards for injuring people crosses the line. Period.

What is your point? I was wrong? Ok. You win. I was wrong.

           

1Va bucsfan

*
Hall of Famer
******
Posts : 3842
Offline
« #77 : March 10, 2012, 10:34:01 PM »

The sordid tale of bounties and under-the-cable cash payments within the walls of the Saints organization takes on a slightly different feel when considering that some of the money that went into the pot came from someone not actually a part of the team.
 
Mike Ornstein’s name appears not in the press release that came from the league on March 2, but in the “confidential” report prepared that same day by NFL Security.  During the 2009 playoffs, the man known commonly as “Orny” pledged (according to NFL Security) $10,000 toward the bounty.  Ornstein later promised $5,000 toward a bounty on an opposing quarterback in an email to coach Sean Payton.
 
Recently, Jeff Duncan of the New Orleans Times-Picayune took a closer look at Ornstein’s involvement with the Saints, and Ornstein’s history of what Payton called in his book, Home Team, “a taste for mischief.”
 
Ornstein had a strong presence with the franchise in 2009, even though (as Duncan explains it) Ornstein got into a verbal altercation with owner Tom Benson (pictured) in the days preceding Super Bowl XLIV.  Eventually, Ornstein and Benson made up — and Ornstein got a Super Bowl ring.
 
Duncan also explains that the email offering a $5,000 bounty applied to Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers for the first game of the 2011 regular season.
 
Given Ornstein’s history of convictions (for battery and later fraud and most recently conspiracy), his involvement could make the league come down harder on the Saints.  It also could attract the attention of the authorities, who initially could poke around in an effort to learn more about Ornstein’s motivations and later decide to delve more deeply into what ultimately was an organized effort to inflict injury for money.
http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/category/rumor-mill/

\\\"The guy who invented the first wheel was an idiot, the guy who invented the other three, he was a genius

freddy

*
Hall of Famer
******
Posts : 3606
Offline
« #78 : March 10, 2012, 10:37:01 PM »

Since most teams have been doing this since the 70's and will continue to do it....I think the whole thing is being blown out of proportion and honestly pretty stupid. All I can say is I am glad it's the Saints that will get unfairly made an example of, and I am also glad we did not hire Greg Williams. The Rams are screwed now.

I disagree. I think most teams since 1970 have tried to kill everyone in general. But I doubt there have been many pay to injure teams.
  Page: 1 ... 4 5 6
Pewter Report  >>  Boards  >>  The Red Board (Moderators: 3rd String Kicker, PRPatrol)  >>  Topic: Bounty Bowl Discussion « previous next »
:  

Hide Tools Show Tools