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« : August 07, 2013, 10:33:22 PM »

http://uk.reuters.com/article/2013/08/07/uk-dea-irs-idUKBRE9761B620130807

"Defence attorneys and some former judges and prosecutors say that systematically hiding potential evidence from defendants violates the U.S. Constitution. According to documents and interviews, agents use a procedure they call "parallel construction" to recreate the investigative trail, stating in affidavits or in court, for example, that an investigation began with a traffic infraction rather than an SOD tip."

Basically, they were using an overseas spying network to spy on people they couldn't here, use that information to prosecute them, while lying about how they got said information or knew where to look for information.

**CENSORED** is getting beyond belief.


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« #1 : August 07, 2013, 11:03:26 PM »

you might want to re-read

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« #2 : August 08, 2013, 12:44:37 PM »

I did re-read and what I saw was an IRS manual instructing investigators to "omit any reference to tips supplied by the DEA's Special Operations Division, especially from affidavits, court proceedings or investigative files." and to ""recreate" the investigative trail to effectively cover up the original source of the information."

So during a trial if a law enforcement agent is asked "how did you become aware of XXXXXXXX?"  and he responds "during a traffic stop" when in fact he had info from a secret database prior to the traffic stop, then the LEA just committed perjury for the prosecution.

How is that possibly defensible let alone Constitutional ?????


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« #3 : August 08, 2013, 12:49:51 PM »

I did re-read and what I saw was an IRS manual instructing investigators to "omit any reference to tips supplied by the DEA's Special Operations Division, especially from affidavits, court proceedings or investigative files." and to ""recreate" the investigative trail to effectively cover up the original source of the information."

So during a trial if a law enforcement agent is asked "how did you become aware of XXXXXXXX?"  and he responds "during a traffic stop" when in fact he had info from a secret database prior to the traffic stop, then the LEA just committed perjury for the prosecution.

How is that possibly defensible let alone Constitutional ?????

That part of it  agree with, its a mess.  I presume that the issue you raise is why the DEA information is supposed to be used to obtain an independent legal evidentiary basis. I think  even thne it still poses a problem, certainly from a probable cause perspective, but recreating (read: fabricating) an investigative trail?  Wow

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« #4 : August 24, 2013, 05:16:25 PM »

Stuff gets more interesting every day.... errrr... night.  Wonder if they tap into Senator's calls...

August 23, 2013, 8:45 PM ET
NSA Officers Spy on Love Interests
BySiobhan Gorman

WASHINGTON—National Security Agency officers on several occasions have channeled their agency’s enormous eavesdropping power to spy on love interests, U.S. officials said.

The practice isn’t frequent — one official estimated a handful of cases in the last decade — but it’s common enough to garner its own spycraft label: LOVEINT.

Spy agencies often refer to their various types of intelligence collection with the suffix of “INT,” such as “SIGINT” for collecting signals intelligence, or communications; and “HUMINT” for human intelligence, or spying.

The “LOVEINT” examples constitute most episodes of willful misconduct by NSA employees, officials said.

In the wake of revelations last week that NSA had violated privacy rules on nearly 3,000 occasions in a one-year period, NSA Chief Compliance Officer John DeLong emphasized in a conference call with reporters last week that those errors were unintentional. He did say that there have been “a couple” of willful violations in the past decade. He said he didn’t have the exact figures at the moment.

NSA said in a statement Friday that there have been “very rare” instances of willful violations of any kind in the past decade, and none have violated key surveillance laws. “NSA has zero tolerance for willful violations of the agency’s authorities” and responds “as appropriate.”

The LOVEINT violations involved overseas communications, officials said, such as spying on a partner or spouse. In each instance, the employee was punished either with an administrative action or termination.

Most of the incidents, officials said, were self-reported. Such admissions can arise, for example, when an employee takes a polygraph tests as part of a renewal of a security clearance.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D., Calif.), who chairs the Senate intelligence committee, said the NSA told her committee about a set of “isolated cases” that have occurred about once a year for the last 10 years, where NSA personnel have violated NSA procedures.

She said “in most instances” the violations didn’t involve an American’s personal information. She added that she’s seen no evidence that any of the violations involved the use of NSA’s domestic surveillance infrastructure, which is governed by a law known as the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.

“Clearly, any case of noncompliance is unacceptable, but these small numbers of cases do not change my view that NSA takes significant care to prevent any abuses and that there is a substantial oversight system in place,” she said. “When errors are identified, they are reported and corrected.”


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« #5 : August 24, 2013, 07:11:50 PM »

http://uk.reuters.com/article/2013/08/07/uk-dea-irs-idUKBRE9761B620130807

"Defence attorneys and some former judges and prosecutors say that systematically hiding potential evidence from defendants violates the U.S. Constitution. According to documents and interviews, agents use a procedure they call "parallel construction" to recreate the investigative trail, stating in affidavits or in court, for example, that an investigation began with a traffic infraction rather than an SOD tip."

Basically, they were using an overseas spying network to spy on people they couldn't here, use that information to prosecute them, while lying about how they got said information or knew where to look for information.

**CENSORED** is getting beyond belief.
I would think a good defense attorney is going to enjoy this...OBD


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« #6 : August 25, 2013, 11:57:43 AM »

This is going to go over like the proverbial lead balloon...

German magazine: NSA spied on United Nations
Published August 25, 2013Associated PressFacebook2 Twitter13 LinkedIn0

FILE: June 6, 2013: An aerial view of the NSA's Utah Data Center in Bluffdale, Utah.AP
BERLIN –  The German magazine Der Spiegel says the U.S. National Security Agency secretly monitored the U.N.'s internal video conferencing system by decrypting it last year.

The weekly said Sunday that documents it obtained from American leaker Edward Snowden show the NSAdecoded the system at the U.N.'s headquarters in New York last summer.

Quoting leaked NSA documents, the article said the decryption "dramatically increased the data from video phone conferences and the ability to decode the data traffic."

In three weeks, Der Spiegel said, the NSA increased the number of decrypted communications at the U.N. from 12 to 458.

Snowden's leaks have exposed details of the United States' global surveillance apparatus, sparking an international debate over the limits of American spying.

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« #7 : August 25, 2013, 12:28:48 PM »

Let me ask the question...Where do you draw the line?...Safety for our Country and Being an Over Zealous idiot? I don't get it. Are they afraid that we have Politicians given Terrorist a upper hand? Folks all of our politicians have a hand in this. There are committee's that have both Republican and Democrat politicians that are allowing this. So we need a list of such people who are allowing this to happen. Its not just one person. That is what I have learned but I am opened to others who know more than I do in the inner circles...OBD


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« #8 : August 25, 2013, 04:39:44 PM »

What I dont get is what happens when enemies and terrorists go back to old fashion ways of spying? You know how the spy goes into the airport and brushes up against another spy but secretly hands off something.... that kind of stuff....

Apparently there is word such people are using thumb drives now. These little things can store gigabytes of data. They are tiny, lightweight, and never checked for content at border crossings. Meanwhile the NSA is busy looking over your e-mail to grandma.

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« #9 : August 25, 2013, 05:27:55 PM »

What I dont get is what happens when enemies and terrorists go back to old fashion ways of spying? You know how the spy goes into the airport and brushes up against another spy but secretly hands off something.... that kind of stuff....

Apparently there is word such people are using thumb drives now. These little things can store gigabytes of data. They are tiny, lightweight, and never checked for content at border crossings. Meanwhile the NSA is busy looking over your e-mail to grandma.
If you know this stuff....and others know of this (somehow information got to you about how to pass on information) wouldn't you think we are doing the same. I would guarantee it. People do know deception and counterspying techniques...Just saying...OBD


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« #10 : August 25, 2013, 07:30:08 PM »

Let me ask the question...Where do you draw the line?...Safety for our Country and Being an Over Zealous idiot? I don't get it. Are they afraid that we have Politicians given Terrorist a upper hand? Folks all of our politicians have a hand in this. There are committee's that have both Republican and Democrat politicians that are allowing this. So we need a list of such people who are allowing this to happen. Its not just one person. That is what I have learned but I am opened to others who know more than I do in the inner circles...OBD
Representatives from both parties are taking the position that the behaviors were unknown to them - now are they telling the truth - that is part of the issue as folks are not believing their Representatives at this moment in time, much more than before now.  And frankly, that makes sense given the IRS crap, the "traitors" found here, and with Manning... add in other issues such as Bengazi, and the President of the US gleefully (my word) announcing the death of Osama Bin Laden, and stating he personally id's targets for drone executions... frankly - the whole damned thing has the appearance of being out of control.

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« #11 : September 02, 2013, 09:16:35 AM »

When we first practice to deceive  ....


NSA misrepresented scope of data collection to secret court
By Evan Perez, CNN Justice Reporter
updated 8:05 AM EDT, Thu August 22, 2013

Court: NSA misrepresented scope of collection

Obama administration declassified secret court opinions showing broad collection of Internet data
Opinions showed that the NSA was misrepresenting its effort to the special anti-terror court
NSA surveillance programs brought to public light by Edward Snowden leaks
NEW: Intelligence official says problem was technological; was not a case of "overeager" spying
 
Washington (CNN) -- The Obama administration on Wednesday declassified opinions from a secret court that oversees government surveillance showing the National Security Agency was broadly collecting domestic Internet communications of Americans and misrepresenting the scope of that effort to the court.
The three opinions include one from October 2011 by U.S. District Judge John Bates, who scolded government lawyers that the NSA had, for the third time in less than three years, belatedly acknowledged it was collecting more data than it was legally allowed to.

"NSA acquires valuable information through its upstream collection, but not without substantial intrusions on Fourth Amendment protected interests," Bates wrote.
The focus of the opinion was the government's admission that for three years, under its authority to monitor foreign communications, it had been collecting information beyond what it gets from Internet service providers, and included data that was entirely domestic.

The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court estimated the mistaken collection of domestic data, including e-mails and other Internet activity of Americans, totaled 58,000 communications a year.
 NSA accused of illegal surveillance Court: NSA illegally collected data Greenwald: Journalism is not terrorism Greenwald: I will be more aggressive now
Report: NSA can see 75% of U.S. web messages The NSA said the collection was a mistake that went beyond its authority under Section 702 of the Patriot Act.
"This was a situation where there was technological problem that could not be avoided, rather than any overreach" by the NSA, according to a senior intelligence official who spoke with reporters about the matter.

The other FISA Court opinions from November 2011 and September 2012 covered NSA steps to fix errors it made in over-collecting data and to purge data it shouldn't have collected. Those rulings indicated that the matter had been resolved.

The overall issue, the intelligence official said, was immediately raised with the court. "The FISA court probed deeply and thoroughly into the issue. The government took strong appropriate steps to remedy the problem, and the court determined it had remedied and that the collection could continue," according to the official who did not speak for attribution.
"This is not an egregious overreaching by a greedy agency seeking to spy on Americans," the official added. NSA admits 'mistakes' amid criticism after audit show is broke privacy rules
The administration also released documents provided to Congress to persuade lawmakers to reauthorize its surveillance authorities.

The agency has come under pressure from lawmakers of both parties over the sweeping nature of its secret data collection, most recently surveillance that captures telephone metadata related to communications to and from the United States. That program and the one addressed in the document release on Wednesday were brought to public light through leaks to media outlets by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, who fled the United States and is now in Russia under temporary asylum. He faces espionage charges. Their exposure also has generated concern from privacy groups and libertarians.

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy, who has proposed legislation aimed at reforming certain provisions of the Patriot Act related to the FISA Court, welcomed the newest development.
"Today's release of documents by the Director of National Intelligence begins to appropriately draw back the curtain on the secret law of government surveillance, and they also underscore the need for increased oversight and stronger protections for Americans' privacy," he said in a statement.
Leahy is planning a hearing in coming weeks on the document release.
In 2008, the NSA began collecting what it called "upstream" communications, essentially information that travels across the Internet, separate from the what it receives from Internet service providers that filter data to respond to agency requests.
The NSA is supposed to be targeting foreign communications, such as e-mail addresses it believes relate to foreign intelligence, that have to do with potential terrorism investigations.
The NSA said it made mistakes because of the way data was collected. It couldn't separate information that was entirely domestic.
Government lawyers won approval from the court after making changes and later deleted years of data because some of it couldn't be separated from domestic communications.


\"A Great Coach has to have a Patient Wife, A Loyal Dog, and a Great Quarterback. . . . but not necessarily in that order\" ~ Coach Bud Grant
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