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August 31, 2011 @ 10:55 am
Current rating: 5.00 Stars/2 Votes

Where Is The Leader On Tampa Bay's Defense?

Written by Chidi
Ahanotu
Bucs MLB Hardy Nickerson and DEs Chidi Ahanotu (72) and Regan Upshaw (73)
Bucs MLB Hardy Nickerson and DEs Chidi Ahanotu (72) and Regan Upshaw (73) Getty Images
Chidi Ahanotu

Chidi
Ahanotu

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Not quite sold yet on the leadership ability of DT Gerald McCoy and rookie MLB Mason Foster, former Bucs DE Chidi Ahanotu likens the 2011 Tampa Bay defense to a bunch of Indians running around without a chief. Ahanotu wants to see the Bucs get a veteran middle linebacker to provide leadership.
We’ve all heard the famous saying “too many chiefs and not enough Indians,” which means that if a group of people consists of mostly leaders and not enough followers that production problems arise. In the case of the 2011 Buccaneers defense there is a lack of leadership.

“The Bucs look like a bunch of Indians running around without a chief.”

Those were the words of legendary leader Hardy Nickerson upon examining the team that let him go and chose to not re-sign him after the 1999 Buccaneers’ NFC Championship Game. Nickerson’s assessment of his former team’s defense was right on the money.

The 2000 Tampa Bay defense sorely missed Nickerson’s presence and leadership on the field and off the field. Nickerson was replaced with Jamie Duncan, who was a good player in his own right, but was not, however, the nasty, foaming-at-the-mouth player that Nickerson was. In fact, Duncan was the opposite and was quite silent and laid back on and off the field.

In Nickerson’s absence, the Bucs still made the playoffs, but got knocked out in the first round by the Philadelphia Eagles. The drop off in production and the letdown after the high expectations of the reigning 1999 NFC Central Division Champs can be attributed to the team’s choice of letting Nickerson go. It was like cutting out the heart of a dreaded monster. Not only did Nickerson serve as the leader for the defense, but for the entire team, including the offense. A defensive-led team, the Bucs rose and fell by the pulse of Nickerson, its dominant leader who set the tone for the entire team on and off the field.

Where is the Buccaneers’ fearless leader? Where is its heart? Its pulse? Having a fiery head coach like Raheem Morris is a great plus, but unfortunately coaches can’t step on the field and coaches can’t knock out the opposing team’s players or rally the troops in the middle of the battlefield.

While I applaud Tampa Bay’s front office for following the blueprint of growing a team full of young players and allowing them to gel without cutting a lot of players and adding high-priced veteran free agents from different teams, I have to ask “where is the Bucs leader?”

On offense, traditionally that leader almost always is the team’s quarterback, and young Josh Freeman’s imposing stature and impressive play makes an easy leader of him. But on defense, there is traditionally no one position that speaks for itself and acclaims itself the leader.

No, on defense leaders have to step up, shout out, and demand leadership by their play, by their attitude, and by their words on and off the field. Is anybody shouting, stepping up, and demanding leadership? Young second-year defensive lineman Gerald McCoy is often seen in the media assuming the leadership position and speaking words of responsibility and accountability for the Bucs defense. But McCoy hasn’t done anything on the field to demand that leadership. And at such a young age, McCoy shouldn’t be criticized for not reaching stellar production nor grown a true voice of leadership.

McCoy’s self-ownership of the leadership role is more a byproduct of his high draft status being Tampa Bay’s first-round pick and the NFL’s third overall pick in 2010. So I ask again, where is the Bucs defensive leader?

In the glory days, which were the Buccaneers defense’s years of league-wide dominance, the defense was led by nasty, foaming-at-the-mouth players at every level. Warren Sapp was the mouth that roared on the defensive line. Nickerson was the one spewing venom for the linebackers. And John Lynch was the heat-seeking missile in the secondary.

What about Derrick Brooks? Well, when I was with the Bucs, Brooks was relatively quiet compared to Nickerson and Sapp. It wasn’t in his nature to be a fire-and-brimstone kind of leader with his voice. But his gladiator play and the way he stalked the field spoke more than enough. He was the consummate pro on and off the field and led by sheer presence. His hits were loud and his big plays were loud. I love Brooks to death, but it wasn’t his personality to be loud with his voice.

The revival of Tampa Bay’s defense all started with the free agent signing of a Nickerson in 1993. Both Sapp and Lynch watched and learned from Nickerson how the game is supposed to be played. I too learned how to become a snarling, teeth gnashing, attack dog from the great Nickerson. I became somewhat of a leader in my own right, not backing down to anybody on opposing teams or even players on our own team. The highly-publicized feud between Sapp and I actually was birthed from the rise of both of us into leadership-type roles in the Nickerson mold.

Most fans do not realize that I was the one player who would constantly speak up and get in Sapp’s face when he did wrong or said wrong, when he didn’t live up to expectations, and when he excelled. Sapp was the one player that would get on me, prod me, and get in my face for the same reasons I did. We both pushed each other and we both fed off each other.

We grew up together and became warriors in our own right, and at times, and warriors clash as Sapp and I did in our infamous in-season locker room fistfight in the year 2000. As I said, there can only be one chief so Sapp’s emergence as an NFL superstar and my emergence as the team’s franchise player created two would-be chiefs, which became an eventual problem that turned from competitive fire into something ugly boiling over.

After many years of feuding, Sapp and I eventually patched things up during our retirement from the NFL. No matter what our differences and disagreements, he is my brother and I am his. Our fight probably would have never happened if Nickerson were still in our locker room controlling, managing, overseeing and leading. With Nickerson gone, the locker room became overrun with immature behavior, bickering, and clashes.

Former Bucs first-round pick defensive lineman Marcus Jones and future Super Bowl XXXIV MVP Dexter Jackson also eventually clashed with Sapp. Bucs fans and the public at large are most familiar with Sapp splashed on the front page of newspapers and on the cover of sports magazines like Sports Illustrated and Pewter Report as the leader and chief of our defense, and rightfully so.

Sapp was a dominant player the likes of which the NFL won’t see again for years to come. But behind the scenes though, Nickerson was the true leader. Eventually there were a few clashes amongst leader-type players in the Bucs locker room. Sure, relationships were tested and strained, but on the field, we made magic together.

I believe this type of locker room brawling is healthy for a NFL defense. It separates the weak from the strong, and makes the weak stronger. It sets the tone for the type of ruthlessness and rowdiness an NFL defense must have to be great. I believe it builds the type of cold-blooded attitude that an NFL defense must have to become great. So too do I believe that the Bucs should do themselves a favor and follow the Bucs’ blue print to the letter and search for their next Nickerson in the free agent market, although the team believes it has that type of player in rookie Mason Foster.

Traditionally, defenses are led by its middle linebacker, who not only huddles the players up, calls the plays, makes the checks, calls the stunts and adjustments; but who also leads by his defiant personality and nasty, hard-hitting play. The Bucs made a move in the right direction by letting Barrett Ruud go. He never lived up to the type of player a traditional middle linebacker must be.

However, replacing Ruud with a rookie like Foster was not a step in the right direction. The Bucs didn’t acquire a seasoned leader that this defense sorely needs. Instead, the Bucs, while riddled with talent, are a bunch of Indians running around with no chief. Sure, these young players can continue to run around through many years of playing together and I am sure eventually in years to come one or more of these players may emerge as the chief of all these Indians running around. I just don’t see it right now.

The Bucs’ front office is dedicated to keeping these players together for years to come to develop them by virtue of having them grow very familiar with each other as a unit. There is a lot to be said of following this game plan, and many teams have seen great results by doing so. But I am convinced that in this day and age of modern NFL culture, it may take three to four more years before this group sprouts the type of leaders that a dominant NFL defense needs to have.

I lean towards the side of going ahead and finding a veteran free agent middle linebacker that will come in, add the right mix and chemistry, assume the position of being the chief, and leading this young bunch of Indians. Hopefully, the Bucs front office will see this too and make use of the millions dollars of cap space and get a chief. Until then let’s hope these young Indians grow up fast and a leader emerges.

ESPN on-air analyst and former Bucs secondary coach, Herman Edwards announced on Sunday that the Buccaneers were the most disappointing team heading into the regular season. He made his analysis from Tampa Bay’s preseason play due to the lack of offensive prowess. But because of the fact that the Bucs offense have a stand-up leader in QB Josh Freeman I believe they will rise to the top as the season progresses.

On defense, the Bucs have shown some strength and have been impressive in their shutout against the Kansas City Chiefs and their win against the Miami Dolphins. But surely to turn the corner and become a dominant, feared defense year in and year out, the Bucs defense must have a true leader to rally the troops on the battlefield as a long, hard season unfolds. When times get tough, and they will surely get tough, who do the young defensive players look to, learn from and lean on?

Time will tell if any of these young players develop into this leader that the others on defense gain inspiration from. To win now and for years to come, implement a foundation and face for Tampa Bay’s defense by acquiring a proven leader from the free agent market. Time, brings truth to light, I trust it so.

Chidi Ahanotu was an NFL defensive end for 12 seasons, including eight with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers (1993-2000). Ahanotu is the fifth all-time leading sacker in Buccaneers history with 34.5 QB captures. His career-high 10 sacks in 1997 helped the Bucs make the playoffs for the first time in 13 years and led to him being Tampa Bay's franchise player in 1998.

Aside from being a columnist for PewterReport.com, Ahanotu is the owner of Cigars of Soho, which is located at 212 S. Armenia Ave. in Tampa, Fla. To visit the Cigars of Soho Facebook page, click here. Cigars of Soho is open until midnight every night.

Cigars of Soho is the only South Tampa cigar lounge open after dinner to enjoy a nice cigar. Wednesday night is poker night at 9:00 p.m., and the lounge has NFL games on high definition TV on Sunday and Monday nights.
Last modified on Wednesday, 31 August 2011 12:08
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COMMENTS

  • avatar

    FINALLY! Someone that is willing to state the obvious with this team. I've been critical of Pewter Report in the past as they seem to avoid any criticism of the Bucs but instead like to trash those that have left the team. There is no leader on the defense, there is no nasty rip your head of player on this team...yet. Clayborn could be that guy but he's young. It's not in McCoy's personality to be that guy, he's a great locker room guy but he's no Warren Sapp, there will not be another Warren Sapp. Warren Sapp was an *censored* on and off the field. McCoy may be very productive but that remains to be seen. Right now he cant stay healthy. I find it interesting that so many on here bash Chiti, a guy that has actually played football, who has experienced the locker rooms, understands the business and you argue from the complete opposite of the spectrum with none of the above. Here's the reality, attendance is still terrible, the head coach has a losing record and we have not seen the playoffs in 3 years. Somebody on the defense better step up or Raheem the dream is done.
  • avatar

    Look, if this defense is just 'a bunch of Indians running around with no chief' then I say let 'em be! They have more sacks in a pre-season then I've ever seen and this is collectively a VERY YOUNG group. Leaders don't always have to be foaming at the mouth Nickerson types. Ruud sure as hell didn't fit that mold. I think right now it's Keith Millard to be honest. He is the veteran presence on the Bucs defense. He is causing each and every player on that D-line to step their game up. I just don't get the point of this article. Other than the New England game which they game planned for and we didn't...I think the defense is playing far better than last year. I am a little worried about our vulnerability in the middle playing the Tampa 2 in pass defense but I really don't think any opposing QB is going to be able to get comfortable in the pocket against us this year. Save articles like this until they are actually warranted. This was just lame.
  • avatar

    What you read in the media is not always a true assessment of what really is going on in locker rooms, teams, and front offices. The nuance, dynamics, and environments of personnel relationships in locker rooms and on teams is something you'd only know if you were actually on a team or in a locker room every day like reporters, players, staff, and coaches.....As to your comments here is the answer. All of those leaders you mentioned that replaced Hardy and brought the Bucs Championships EMERGED through time. Hardy exploded on the scene from day one as the undisputed leader. He came, he saw, he conquered. Brooks, Sapp, Lynch, Ronde all grew into leaders in some fashion over time. As I said these young Bucs (indians) can grow up together and some emerge as chief and that very well may be a good game plan. But to win now and implement a foundation for these young would be chiefs to learn from the Bucs should find their next Hardy Nickerson in the free agency market next year. As to whom that next Hardy type player may be...who knows. Who knew who Hardy Nickerson even was before he came to the Bucs? I bet very few knew. And who knew Hardy Nickerson's fire and brimstone leadership qualities before he came to the Bucs? I bet very few. See these are things only those INSIDE locker rooms could truly tell you. See their may be a next Hardy Nickerson out there in free agency....it just may be that this player isn't splashed all over the news pages and tv screens. Just like Hardy wasn't front page news before he became a Buc. But I can ASSURE you...those inside the Pittsburgh Steelers locker room where Hardy came from all knew all about the great Hardy Nickerson's leadership qualities.
  • avatar


    Thank you for responding. I appreciate your opinion and knowledge of the Bucs and the "inside" stories. I can see where you are coming from and respect that. For some of you fans; just because the media especially TV show the faces of Sapp, Brooks, Lynch doesn't mean that they are the true leades. Before Nickerson, Ii remember a guy by the name of Hugh Green and that Dewey Selmon. It appears to me that the true leader on defense is like PR has said; it's usually a linebacker.
  • avatar


    Wow, Chidi reflected the points I made on other articles, including the fact that I don't think Hardy gets the credit for the Bucs winning the Superbowl as he deserves. Now Hardy is a little bit of an egomaniac. But sometimes a team needs one of those guys. An example of another one is Reggie White, although more softspoken, a leader and egomaniac. I do think it is important for a fiery guy on defense as a leader or at least an emotional motivator. Derrick was/is a soft spoken leader and often rolled his eyes at Nickerson's antics. I think those guys are important to show teammates how to prepare and be professional. But I disagree with ChandlerGlover on this point, I don't think a game as emotional as professional football can be lead by "lead by example" guys. There always has to be a guy to get in people's faces and raise the emotions of a team. I disagree with Chidi and many of you, I do not think Barrett Rudd was that guy. I have hopes for Foster becoming that emotional leader, problem is a rookie rarely can be that guy. Like the article Chidi and the insight.
  • avatar


    Thanks, throwbackfreeman, we have to keep'em honest
  • avatar

    dude, chandlerglover, great post
  • avatar

    Barret Rudd was our Hardy Nickerson and this is our year 2000. Should be interesting.
  • avatar

    I completely understand where he is coming from, but it appears that Talib is a leader of the DBs and McCoy the D-Line and Black the LBs. As time goes on, that might change, because Clayborne sems to be a vocal leader type as well.
  • avatar


    Chidi Bang Bang- Wonderful piece. I hope we get to hear allot more from you. You were such a good player, it was a real pleasure to watch you play the game. All the best.
  • avatar


    Thanks MJMOODY! I appreciate that.
  • avatar


    "Defensive leaders must emerge"--Yes! "They must lead the team through hard work"--Yes! "Defensive leaders must demand leadership by their play"--Yes! "Demand it by their attitude"--Yes! "They must demand it by their words on and off the field"--Yes! So the Bucs' should go out and spend $$ on a FA MLB 10 days before the season starts and make him that leader--Ye..Wait, WHAT?!? I think I'd rather wait and see how the first half of the season plays out. Give guys a chance to acclimate. I'm more concerned about the O-line (full of veterans) than I am the Defense. --Great & well thought out post by chandlerglover. Way to speak your mind.
  • avatar

    I think we might need to wait to the start of the season for this talk.. We our talking about a kid from college that had no preseason at all. Could you not tell a difference last game in our front four.. This will be a working progress yes but would you really rather follow anyother team in the league..I think not. I love are front 4 when there all there, it was great to see price out there for a change right. I have to admit I am scared at CB without Talib, Talib if you ever go on this site which I am sure the bucs do...PLS stop you could be the BEST CB in the league very soon. They already rank him the 3 best but if people havnt figured it out the bucs are a different team when he is not there period. Say what you want I wish that man would step up and be the leader this team needs and stop going to Texas.. He has the fire in his eyes the old D had..I have faith brother turn that life around for the better..good luck
  • avatar


    A leader will emerge, it will be Da'quan Bowers. He will have to beat out Bennett, he will have to overcome an injury and disrespected in the draft, everything the team will need to rally around because he will have proved his worth
  • avatar

    I totally agree with Chidi. Getting rid of Ruud is a mistake. Even if he doesn't start as middle, he has enough experience and leadership to play outside and to mentor the younger guys like Foster and McCoy. Barber is going to have to step into that role. He is going to have to be the leader for the entire defense not just the Secondary. He has been there longer than anyone, and he can call these guys out.
  • avatar

    Chidi: Good work,Sir! Some fellas on this site are angry and just ready to pounce...usually because life has dealt them a gig at Taco Bell or something...not that there's anything wrong with that of course. You always played with a lot of heart and hustle( both tour of duties). Thanks for the insight...enjoyed your candor on HBO as well...take care..
  • avatar


    I almost couldn't wait to stop reading this article so I can say what a crock it is. I am thoroughly disappointed Chidi because your 1st article read so well. Hardy’s impact on the Bucs was unquestionable, however at the time of his release his self evaluation of both himself and the Bucs was way off. If I remember correctly in his parting shots he said that there were currently no leaders on the team and no one on the then current roster had the making of one. He evened singled out Derrick brooks says he was far from a leader. So I have formed several questions for you and Mr. Hardy both, (because you seem as delusional as he did back then). 1. How can you have a current “Defensive Player of the Year”, (Sapp 99’ DPOY), on the then current roster and he not be an unquestionable leader also? 2. At the defenses peak, 2002, who was the nasty, foaming at the mouth Pro-bowler manning the mike position? Shelton “freaking" Quarles! Really? 3. Also at the peak of Tampa’s Defensive dominance there was another DPOY calling the plays and checks for the defense but I can remember his name. Couldn’t have been Derrick Brooks because Hardy says he’ll never be the guy. Wait…..it was! Please get off of Hardy’s coat tail. Maybe you needed that butt whipping in the locker room back then but most don’t. Derrick was quiet at first because he was a student of the game. There is a difference between a leader and a bully. Once the bully Sapp gave way to the student Brooks we won it all. You’re asking for traditional parts for a nontraditional defense. At the time you played in the NFL the Cover Two was not a traditional defense. The two teams that won the Superbowl using this defense both had a dominant D Line with at least one probowler phenom, one stellar linebacker and an outstanding safety. The staff when you played was half teachers and half fire and brimstone. Raheem only wants teachers not drill sergeants, see Todd Walsh, because competitive, fundamentally sound, students of the game last longer and are harder to beat, see Patriots. My last point is just because a guy is nice and laid back doesn’t mean he can’t lead extremely well. Hardy Nickerson was just as impactful as Reggie White was.
  • avatar

    What you read in the media is not always a true assessment of what really is going on in locker rooms, teams, and front offices. The nuance, dynamics, and environments of personnel relationships in locker rooms and on teams is something you'd only know if you were actually on a team or in a locker room every day like players, reporters, staff, and coaches.....As to your comments here is the answer. All of those leaders you mentioned that replaced Hardy and brought the Bucs Championships EMERGED through time. Hardy exploded on the scene from day one as the undisputed leader. He came, he saw, he conquered. Brooks, Sapp, Lynch, Ronde all grew into leaders in some fashion over time. As I said these young Bucs (indians) can grow up together and some emerge as chief and that very well may be a good game plan. But to win now and implement a foundation for these young would be chiefs to learn from the Bucs should find their next Hardy Nickerson in the free agency market next year. As to whom that next Hardy type player may be...who knows. Who knew who Hardy Nickerson even was before he came to the Bucs? I bet very few knew. And who knew Hardy Nickerson's fire and brimstone leadership qualities before he came to the Bucs? I bet very few. See these are things only those INSIDE locker rooms could truly tell you. See their may be a next Hardy Nickerson out there in free agency....it just may be that this player isn't splashed all over the news pages and tv screens. Just like Hardy wasn't front page news before he became a Buc. But I can ASSURE you...those inside the Pittsburgh Steelers locker room where Hardy came from all knew all about the great Hardy Nickerson's leadership qualities.
  • avatar


    I will add that Mason Foster appears to be that leader down the road in a few years. He is one mean dude, but he's ultra wet behind the ears right now. Gerald McCoy just seems too nice for the job. McCoy's demeanor reminds me of another Oklahoma Buc....LeRoy Selmon, now if McCoy can duplicate Selmon's play on the field, we'll have something. The story Walter Payton told about LeRoy was a classic. Payton is getting ready to break a long touchdown run when LeRoy roars past him and whistles and then turns back and makes the tackle. LeRoy was a nice guy but he had an ego and he was one nasty dude between the white lines. Opposing team left tackles couldn't wait for the 4th quarter to end. LeRoy's older brother Lucious warned the football world about the baby brother when LeRoy was comming out of high school. Lucious couldn't handle LeRoy then and he was a senior starting middle linebacker at Georgia Tech. Currently LeRoy is the only Buc in the NFL Hall of Fame. That is getting ready to change soon. I see Sapp, Brooks, Lynch and maybe Barber joining the elite club down the road. But LeRoy was a beast and although listed at 6'3" 265 lbs, LeRoy's real playing weight hovered between 240 and 245 lbs. Can you imagine how tough a guy that size has to be to stike the fear and dread into 6'5" 310 lb left tackles that the great LeRoy Selmon did?
  • avatar


    Hardy! Hardy! Ah, those were the days; but there are few players with his natural leadership (spit in your face) skills and certainly even fewer available. Is there ever an article that Horse doesn't in some fashion discredit Gerald McCoy? Read what Chidi said Horse. The great Sapp was no leader from his seat on the bench in his first year and neither was Chidi. Can you give the guy a chance for crying out loud? You were in the military. Was a young lieutenant right out of OTS expected to command like a seasoned bird colonel on his first assignment? Of course not.
  • avatar


    The Hardware man came in and right off the bat silenced the false profit Keith McCants and proceded to mold this team in the Steel city image. Great insight Chidi. The kind of insight only a veteran of the NFL wars understands. You just gave me something to think about that makes sense. Any suggestions on a nasty MLB?
  • avatar


    It wouldn't surprise me if by the end of the year we are talking about Clayborn being a (not necessarily "the" only) leader on defense. A relentless motor and the alleged dislike of people (say nastiness), might be the combination that gets the attention of the defense.
  • avatar

    Chidi, welcome. Miss those dreads, man! lol Great article. Didn't realize that Mc Coy wasn't the "leader" although from my understanding McKenzie was making some moves in that direction but if he isn't a starter, I can see how that won't work. Hopefully, someone will emerge by mid season....any guesses who that might be? Ronde doesn't strike me as a vocal, cop-type guy either although I'm sure he has everyone's respect!!!
  • avatar

    Good stuff, Chidi. Glad to have you aboard PR. Your insight on this team is a breath of fresh air.
  • avatar


    Great article Chidi and I get it! The franchise QB inherits the position of leader of the offense, but it's different for the defense. The leader of the defense must be chosen on the field of play with the longevity, performance, and the personality to seize ( yes seize, because it's not given) the position and hold on to it, because as Chidi says it willed be challenged. Ray Lewis is unquestionably the leader of the Raven's defense by virtue of the qualifications I just mentioned. How can we ever get a player to grow into that position, when every year we replace everybody over 30 with a 21yr old draftee? This isn't see a parade - jump in front of it! GMC can't deem himself leader of the defense because he helped Clayborn and other rookies during the lockout anymore than McKenzie could name himself MLB because he helped Freeman organize workouts and met with Ruud in Omaha. This is a position that has to be earned and this team needs to be left alone long enough for that person to emerge.
  • avatar


    Sorry about the type error.
  • avatar


    Great article ! Miss those days of great defence !
  • avatar

    I don't see Dominik going after a free agent MLB at this point. I can't think of an available player out there that would fill the position and role of a leader any better than what we have. Foster was penciled in as the starting MLB and I believe that's who they'll stick with. Foster is young, but with a season under his belt he might develop into a fiery leader and a solid player. I agree with Chidi, we need a vocal player that takes that role. I think the organization is waiting for it to emerge from one of the young guys on the current roster.
  • avatar

    Enjoyed the article and congrats on the gig. But it's a few months late. No MLB vet is coming any time soon so we'll have to revisit this next year.
  • avatar


    Ronde Barber has been there and done that for years. He will be the guy until a new leader is found from this young team. Perhaps it is the D-line as group.
  • avatar


    Just a great article!!!! A leader on Defense is what we are missing and I know the Coach and other Coaches are trying to fill that void, but that won't work. No matterhow GMC career might becomet, he is not a leader. i think I have been complaining and saying it's his playing ability, but this Articles says a lot to what I was trying to say about GMC and i couldn't put it into the right words.
  • avatar

    Chidi, Great article! You were a great buc! Please send Domminick and mccoy a copy of this article, although its too late now with kickoff a few days away. I miss the nickerson days, it was sad that he left 2 years too early!! What a warrior!
  • avatar

    Great analysis Chidi, and congrats on ur 1st column. Hopefully we see some Chieftans start to emerge on defense this year because I believe you're absolutely right about their needing to be definitive leader on the field. Somebody that recognizes and get's on to his teammates when he knows they could be giving more in terms of effort, and somebody to say pin ur ears back and follow me... I'll lead the charge. GO BUCS!!
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