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August 24, 2011 @ 9:14 pm
Current rating: 3.33 Stars/3 Votes

Saturday Night's Game Against Miami is Blacked Out

Written by Mark
Cook
Mark Cook

Mark
Cook

Editor-In-Chief E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
As reported last week and confirmed tonight, the Buccaneers’ preseason game against the Miami Dolphins Saturday night will be blacked-out locally due to not selling out within 72 hours of kickoff in accordance with the NFL’s attendance policy.

WTSP Channel 10 will rebroadcast the game Saturday night at 11:30 p.m. and Sunday at 12 p.m.

While the team is in hopes of seeing some regular season home games sell out, the distinct possibility of the entire home schedule being unavailable for local live viewing remains.

The Buccaneers were the only team in the NFL who had their entire home schedule of games blacked-out during the 2010 season. Games thought to have the highest possibility of selling out are the home opener against the Detroit Lions September 11 and two nationally televised games [Indianapolis Colts on October 3 and Dallas Cowboys on December 17] later in the season.
Last modified on Wednesday, 24 August 2011 22:20
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COMMENTS

  • avatar

    I know last weeks game was shown on some websites through streaming, does anyone know if this weeks game will also been shown on a live streaming site?
  • avatar

    I have been a Buc fan from the first year they entered the league. This brought me a lot of grief, since I lived in Bear country. Moved to Florida ten years ago, but too far to go to games. I actually live near Jacksonville. But they suck. I listened to all those of you who can go to games and really resent those of you who say it's not the economy. I would love to afford to go to a game. It's one of my biggest hopes. I couldn't go before because my husband was completely disabled and unable to go with me. I couldn't leave him home alone. And I wouldn't because he was a die hard Bucs fan. Now I'm a widow who would come if I could. However, I am going to use the 'economy' word. I lost my job so long ago, that I haven't had unemployment benefits in six months. I lost my home and had to go live with relatives. I have absolutely no income. I depend on others to support me. Since I am almost sixty years old, it's hard to get hired anywhere. So, to those who think that I can afford other things, so I can afford tickets, you need to get real. For some of us, the lack of economy is a very real and terrifying situation. I spent all last season staring at a little box in the corner of the screen trying to catch updates on the Buc's game. The only time I see them is when they play away games. Anyway, I am sick of hearing that the economy is only an excuse. Get real.
  • avatar


    Not sure the feasibility of organizing such a ticket buy, but if folks could be organized to buy the unsold tickets as a group, the games would be broadcast. For instance, if 36,624 people could be organized to pay $50 per game, that equates to $1,831,200. According to this: http://seatgeek.com/tampa-bay-buccaneers-ticket-prices/ the average seat cost is $112 and according to this: http://espn.go.com/nfl/attendance/_/year/2010 the Bucs averaged 49,314 sold at 75.1% capacity meaning 16,350 seats unsold on average. 16,350 * $112 avg cost = $1,831,200. IF 52,320 people could be brought on board, the cost would descend to $35 per game. A couple of things could be done with the tickets: They could be auctioned off or distributed to the paying customers via lottery. All or a portion could be given to charity. BONUS: The local community would be buying these tickets, so it would be a near certainty that our home games would be filled with an extra 15k plus rabid Bucs fans, as opposed to Lions, Steelers and Bears....
  • avatar


    Seriously: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blackout_(broadcasting)#NFL_blackout_policy Learn something.....
  • avatar


    It's the NFL! Not the Glazers. Why is that so hard for some of you to comprehend?
  • avatar


    Blacking out PRESEASON games is horse-spit. This is the crap we've come to expect from the Glazerhouses.
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    I bought season tickets LAST YEAR for the first time, because I knew games would be blacked out and I'm a FAN. I don't want a recap, I want to watch the Bucs LIVE, period. That said, if/when they sell out again, I'll consider whether I want to give up the tickets or not, because the home experience definitely has the edge. I'm not saying it isn't exciting to be at the game it is, but.... the analysis, the replays, the multiple angles, MY beer, MY food, MY couch.... Let's get the numbers straight though: Prices were discounted last year, then AGAIN for this season. I'm in 309 (same as last season). I brought binoculars the first game last season, then never again (don't need them, have a view of the field I PREFER to the 200 (club) level seats, which we tried for FREE last season). I currently pay per game $79 for me, $25 for the youth ticket for my son and $20 for parking at HCC (best parking deal). I was able to make 10 payments, which is/was $124 per payment/per game. That's not a bad deal. Untenable for some folks still, I absolutely understand. We're not rich, but the wife and I (knock on wood) are both employed and making decent money (wouldn't have considered the tickets if we weren't). ALSO, we usually get sodas with FREE refills and occasionally add a pretzel or pizza to the mix. That's it.
  • avatar


    USE EM OR LOSE EM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • avatar


    Chetthevette: I didn't say I agreed with the NFL's blackout policy because I don't. I'm just pointing out that this is not the Glazers doing it independently. As far as I'm concerned the blacking out of pre-season games is ridiculous and to tell you the truth I think blacking out the games diminishes fan interest. What better way to make fans want to be there live and in person than to see the excitement first on TV? It's an outdated policy that is wisely not shared by the other professional leagues. That said; I've been a season ticket holder since 1976 and can speak with some authority as to the psyche of the football fans in this area because I have watched it first hand. When it becomes the thing to do the fringe fans will find the means and show up claiming to have been there all along. Buctebow: Granted there are many great fans who simply can't afford tickets. But their sense of entitlement doesn't mean they should get the product free any more than AMC Theater broadcasting the latest release on TV. The fans here are whimsical more than they are fiscally responsible. The economy issue is all over the NFL but I'll bet the problem areas are the transplant sections of the country. My golly, one need only look at the Saints. Those residents sure found a way to buy tickets as soon as Brees blew into town. They even developed a new perspective of their formerly cheap owner who looks like Mary Poppins with that stupid umbrella.
  • avatar


    As black-outs go, it is what it is...and it's not going to change...although Gary Shelton of the Times suggested the NFL consider using a pay-per-view approach where fans could see single game televised for $27 to $100. I'd be willing to pay that...but it's unlikely to happen since pay-per-view may negatively impact live attendance even more severely. I used to be a season ticket holder, driving over from Orlando with two other friends. They stopped coming, not b/c of ticket prices, but b/c they were tired of: fans yelling in their ears (one had to go to the hospital for treatment), drunkards spilling beer on them, out-of-towners AND transplants sitting in our section booing OUR team...in OUR stadium (!), needing binoculars to see details of the game since we were so high up (even with season tickets), parking hassles, and weather (rain/heat). They stopped coming and I stayed a ticket-holder one more year. It wasn't the same without them. All of us decided to take our wives' suggestions and just stay home to watch since TV was a better experience (with replays, technology, and analysis). I know I'll be criticized by most of you for lack of support (my friends and I are retired, so we can take it), but I don't think my friends and I are alone on this, and we are all still huge Bucs fans.
  • avatar


    Warren, I fully understand what you are saying. Well put.
  • avatar

    Little bit of a rant. The people in Tampa need to stop using the economy as an excuse for not going to the games. NewsFlash! the economy is bad everywhere, but that doesn't prevent teams like the Packers, Bears, Celeveland (to name a few) to pack their stadiums. The reason why is that they have true fans that are loyal and stick to their team and tickets no matter what. Yes, some fans had to probably give up their tickets due to economy which stinks, but is every person that happens to live in Tampa destitute and live on the streets? I'm sorry but blaming the economy is weak excuse.
  • avatar

    Disagree. I have a good job but have been leary of spending extra money since I have had one raise in 5 years. The cost of everything has skyrocketed the last 3 years but my salary has not. To go to the game with my son & park &get something to drink or eat is close to $200. Just not going to do it. I had season tickets but cancelled them last year. It had nothing to do with a new coach or the team rebuilding. That's just me though. ----------------------------------------------- I think it was just a perfect storm for the area: Bad economy, one of the HIGHEST unemployment rates in the country (yes FL and Tampa were hit a little harder than most), years of increased ticket sales to go with flatlines salaries, many people not buying season tickets again after the 10 year renewal period came up, plus add in cleaning house and going with youth in a rebuilding effort.----- Many took a wait and see approach and many others, like me, don't ever plan to buy season tickets again. I wooul just rather go to 1-2 games and watch the rest on a big screen with HD at home in air conditioning. That last point is slowly becoming a problem for the entire NFL. - - - - - - - - - And don't think this is a Tampa issue, about 10+ teams had ticket sales issues or blackout problems. Many were on TV because of owners & TV stations buying the seats. - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - The big issue to me is the outdated idiotic blackouts should have been dealt with (done away with) in the CBA
  • avatar


    Cash80, The Packers have a small stadium to fill, the Bears are in a very large Market area, and finally if you lived in Clevland what else is there to do.
  • avatar

    The great thing about the strike was how the owners and players did so much to help the fan experience. They made parking cheaper lowered concessions lowered ticket prices. Of course you know i am kidding. I get the owners wanting to make money but they lost me a 10 year ticket holder with taking advantage of my team loyalty. When you charge 9 for a beer 25 for parking etc boys im not going to let u gouge me. I'm staying home and watching it on tv. Thats why i Love Vinick
  • avatar


    Scubog, I can see where you are coming from and can agree to a lot of it and some of it I can't. Like any product; it's all about supply & demand. Right now in this environment the prices are too high. There are plety of fans still going to the games, but I bet the average age is higher than a few years ago? Why? Because it's the economy. The youth and young adults have suffered more than us older adults. I don't think any sellout should be based on a stadium size. Whoever has the smallest stadium (Green Bay) should set the standard less 10%. Now that is fair.
  • avatar


    Glaziers should buy the minimum ammount for the blackout to be lifted and donate the tickets to the local USO for the military. Then they get the ad money AND a big tax writeoff. Plus helping the folks in uniform is never a bad call.
  • avatar


    Hey Bucs, trade for Tebow. He's the 4th string QBand might only cost a 5th-7th round draft pick. Use him on short yardage and wildcat plays occasionally. Then you'll put more Gator butts in the seat and the blackouts will go away.
  • avatar


    scubog, lots of fans have valid reasons, financial and personal that they cannot attend games. That does not make them necessarily less of a fan than those that attend. Also while you are correct that the blackout policy is an NFL rule and not the Glazer's, the NFL policies are made by the 32 owners of which the Glazer's are one. This just proves that they are all collectively greedy, not that the Glazer's aren't greedy.
  • avatar


    I love the mentality of it's the fans fault. We pay for the stadium, pay to park and pay ridicules prices for food and drinks but it's our fault games are blacked out. Owners make millions off advertisers paying for hugh TV contracts. Nobody here sees the advertisers commercials though. Game tickets are just the cream off the top. I had season tickets years ago but saw to much greed when they put in seat license requirements. NO...It's the greed of the NFL and the owners...period. Can't get excied about a team that I can't watch. GO RAYS!!!!
  • avatar

    scubog sorry dude, can't agree with you on that. the nfl is just plain mean when it comes to thier dollars. I don't see the rays or the lightning blacking out games. people just don't have the money they used to, I know I don't. besides who wants to pay regular season prices for preseason. here is a thought, just make every game count, 20 game season,now thats something I can get my head around. GO BUCS
  • avatar


    George: It's the NF's policy not the Glazer's greed. Want to know whose fault this is? The fans who sit back and whine but never buy a ticket. They come up with all sorts of excuses, but in reality many of the football fans here resort back to their former team at the first sign of decline by the home team. What killed the season ticket base was when the ten year commitment ended during a down period, thousands of ticket holders made the choice not to renew and to "just watch it on TV." Who knows what they do now besides complain and try to justify their decision by blaming someone else. Nothing but season ticket holders around me for the first ten years with the same faces each game. Now it's never the same people and many times they are wearing the other team's colors. Economy? People still find money for boats, cigarettes, beer and tattoos. Team loyalty is very fleeting. Once it becomes in vogue people will at least come to the game to be seen and post it on Facebook.
  • avatar


    I hope that the Owners will do something quickly with the non-sellout, They are making money, why can'y they give a break to the fans that come to the game and help out even if they have to give a couple of thousands of tickets away at some of the games. They have to look at the Economy. Have a heart Glazers,Really GO BUCS THE TEAMS
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