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January 9, 2012 @ 5:20 pm
Current rating: 4.20 Stars/5 Votes

PR Great Debate: Bucs Should Hire Schottenheimer

Written by Scott
Reynolds
Scott Reynolds

Scott
Reynolds

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Which head coaching candidate should the Bucs hire? In the first installment of the Pewter Report Great Debate, Scott Reynolds says Marty Schottenheimer should become the next head coach in Tampa Bay.

In the first edition of the Pewter Report Great Debate, the PR staff – Scott Reynolds, Mark Cook, Andrew Scavelli and Eric Dellaratta – offers its opinions on which head coach, offensive coordinator and defensive coordinator the Buccaneers should hire to replace Raheem Morris. Reynolds sounds off first, saying that Marty Schottenheimer, whom the Bucs will be interviewing on Tuesday, should become Tampa Bay's next head coach.

SR's PICK FOR HEAD COACH: MARTY SCHOTTENHEIMER
The Buccaneers are interviewing former Cleveland, Kansas City, Washington and San Diego head coach Marty Schottenheimer on Tuesday to fill the vacancy created when Tampa Bay fired head coach Raheem Morris on January 2 after he went 17-31 in three seasons from 2009-11. If Schottenheimer, who will turn 69 in September, has a good interview, the Bucs need to hire him as the franchise’s ninth head coach.

While the Buccaneers were loose, unfocused and undisciplined under the young Morris, who was hired in 2009 at the age of 31, they would quickly become the exact opposite under Schottenheimer, who is known for fielding tough, disciplined football teams during his NFL head coaching career in which he compiled a 200-126-1 record (61.3 percent). Schottenheimer’s last season in the NFL came in 2006 when he led the Chargers to a 14-2 record, but he was fired after a second-round exit in the playoffs after he and general manager A.J. Smith couldn’t resolve their differences.

Although Schottenheimer has a disappointing 5-13 record in the postseason and has never made it to the Super Bowl, he has never posted a losing record at any of his four NFL stops. He posted a 44-27 mark (62 percent) in Cleveland and took the Browns to the AFC Championship Game twice in five years. The Browns went to the playoffs in four out of five seasons under Schottenheimer.


In Kansas City, Schottenheimer was 101-58-1 (63.5 percent) and took the Chiefs to the playoffs seven times in 10 years, including one trip to the AFC Championship Game. The Chiefs posted 10 wins or more in six out of Schottenheimer’s 10 years in K.C.

In Washington in 2001, Schottenheimer went 8-8 (50 percent) before being fired in favor of Steve Spurrier, who was a disaster as the Redskins coach. That was the only coaching stop in which Schottenheimer did not post a winning record during his tenure.

Schottenheimer was 47-33 (58.8 percent) in San Diego from 2002-2006. After going 8-8 in his first season, followed by a 4-12 campaign in 2003, the Chargers went 12-4, 9-7 and 14-2 in his final three years in San Diego. Schottenheimer took the Chargers to the postseason twice in his five seasons as the team’s head coach.

Schottenheimer won his first championship as the head coach and general manager of the UFL’s Virginia Destroyers this past season with a 3-1 record in a shortened season. Some may think that Schottenheimer’s age would be a detriment with the youngest team in the NFL, but the young Buccaneers are smart enough to recognize success when they see it. Keep in mind that at age 68 Schottenheimer related quite well with the Destroyers players.

Also, Kansas State’s Bill Snyder produced a 10-3 football team this year at age 72, which made Snyder the oldest active coach in the FBS (Football Bowl Subdivision) ranks of college football. With the Wildcats being picked eighth to finish in the Big 12 this year, the fact that the Wildcats became a top 10 team made Snyder one of the finalists for coach of the year honors in college football.

In the NFL, former Buffalo head coach Marv Levy took the Bills to Super Bowl in his late 60’s before retiring in 1997 at the age of 72. Levy returned to the Bills to serve as the general manager from 2006-07 until he retired at the age of 81.

With some head coaching candidates shying away from Tampa Bay due to the fact that the Bucs play in the elite NFC South division, Schottenheimer is used to coaching in a rugged division as the AFC West was during his time in Kansas City. The Chiefs were division winners only three times under Schottenheimer (1993, ’95, ‘97) as the Los Angeles Raiders, San Diego Chargers and Denver Broncos each winning the division and making the AFC Championship Game at least once during his tenure in K.C.

In his 21 years as an NFL head coach, Schottenheimer has produced 15 winning seasons, four seasons with a .500 record and just two losing seasons, which is one of the most impressive and prolific records in league history. Simply put, Schottenheimer is a proven winner that knows how to win and teach the art of winning.

Albeit not flashy, Schottenheimer’s teams are hard-nosed and physical, which are traits that general manager Mark Dominik admires and Morris tried to create during his three-year stint as Tampa Bay’s head coach. Schottenheimer is an old-school, no-nonsense disciplinarian whose methods are highly applicable and rooted in success. He will be the best candidate to get back to teaching sound, fundamental football, which is exactly what Tampa Bay needs. Keep in mind that Dominik worked with Schottenheimer in Kansas City in 1994 when Dominik was a scouting intern with the Chiefs, so there is a strong degree of mutual respect between the two men.

A former NFL linebacker, Schottenheimer believes in a strong running game and a stout defense that gets to the quarterback, built around the linebacking corps, which desperately needs revamping in Tampa Bay. During Tampa Bay’s heyday in 1979, the Bucs won with a strong, linebacker-led defense and a chain-moving running game. Over two decades later, the Bucs would nearly reach the Super Bowl in 1999 and ultimately win it during the 2002 season with a suffocating defense led by linebacker Derrick Brooks and a potent running game fueled by Mike Alstott and Michael Pittman.

Tampa Bay quarterback Josh Freeman was called on to do too much in 2011, a season in which he threw a career-high 22 interceptions and only 16 touchdowns. Schottenheimer believes in a run-first approach on offense and likes to use the play-action passing game, which would actually play to Freeman’s strength and help his development as he enters his fourth year in the NFL.

Schottenheimer has always liked big running backs, and has had success with Kevin Mack in Cleveland and Christian Okoye and Barry Word in Kansas City. Inheriting a big back like 240-pound LeGarrette Blount, who will be an exclusive rights free agent in 2012, would be a great starting point to build a strong running game around.

One of Schottenhimer’s strengths has been identifying, hiring and developing great assistant coaches. Big names such as Bill Cowher, Tony Dungy, Herman Edwards, Cam Cameron, Gunther Cunningham, Lindy Infante, Wade Phillips, Tony Sparano and Mike McCarthy have all coached under Schottenheimer in the past.

While Schottenheimer likely wouldn’t coach more than four or five more years given his age, there is a possibility that he could – and might want to – lure his son, Brian, to Tampa Bay to serve as offensive coordinator and potentially serve as his eventual replacement as head coach. Brian Schottenheimer, 38, served under his father as the Chargers quarterbacks coach from 2002-05, and has been the New York Jets offensive coordinator since the 2006 season.

REYNOLDS' PICK FOR OFFENSIVE COORDINATOR: JOE PENDRY
While Brian Schottenheimer is still under contract with the New York Jets, the elder Schottenheimer might be best served to convince Pendry, an old friend and colleague, to come out of retirement. The 64-year old Pendry retired from the University of Alabama last year where he served as the Crimson Tide’s assistant head coach and offensive line coach since joining Nick Saban’s staff in 2007.

Pendry was the offensive coordinator in Kansas City from 1989-92 as part of Schottenheimer’s original coaching staff. Pendry was fired by Schottenheimer, who also terminated two notable assistants in Bruce Arians (running backs) and Howard Mudd (offensive line) following the 1992 season.

“These are very, very fine football coaches, and they have worked tirelessly,” Schottenheimer said at the time. “I reflected long and hard on this, and I and I alone have made the decision.

“We need to find a way to score more points. Our inability to be more point-productive necessitated the changes.”

Schottenheimer was criticized by fans for having an unimaginative offense, which led to Pendry’s dismissal despite him helping the Chiefs get back to their winning ways.

During the 1989 season, the Chiefs posted a winning season with an 8-7-1 record with Okoye rushing for an NFL-high 1,480 yards and 12 touchdowns on 370 carries (4.0 avg.).

Former Bucs quarterback Steve DeBerg threw 23 touchdowns and tossed only five interceptions for the Chiefs in 1990, while the running game produced 1,948 yards on the ground and scored 11 touchdowns, led by Barry Word (1,015 yards, four TDs) and Christian Okoye (805 yards, seven TDs). In ‘90, the Chiefs offense improved and scored 360 points, averaging 23.1 points per game, which ranked sixth out of the 28 NFL teams at the time.

In 1991, the Chiefs won 11 games and won their first playoff game since the 1970 Super Bowl. During the ’91 season, the Chiefs finished 10-6, scoring 322 points and averaging 20.1 per game, which ranked 10th in the NFL. Kansas City had a dominant running game, rushing for 2,217 yards and 14 touchdowns on 521 carries (4.3 avg.). Okoye led the way with 1,031 yards and nine touchdowns on 225 carries, with Word (684 yards and four TDs) and Harvey Williams (447 yards and one score) also contributing.

Injuries to Word and Okoye in 1992 hurt Pendry’s offense as they rushed for 607 yards and four TDs and 448 yards and six scores, respectively. Yet the Chiefs offense scored 348 points (21.8 avg.) in 1992, which ranked seventh in the NFL, before Pendry was fired.

Pendry has 19 years of NFL coaching experience and has played an integral role in developing NFL offensive linemen and future pros in Andre Smith, Antoine Caldwell, Mike Johnson and Barrett Jones, who was this season’s Lombardi Award winner.

And if Pendry doesn’t want to come out of retirement to either run Tampa Bay’s offense or develop the Buccaneers offensive line, Schottenheimer could turn to Terry Shea in the interim. Shea, who worked with Freeman and Detroit quarterback Matthew Stafford prior to the 2009 NFL Draft, served as Schottenheimer’s offensive coordinator for the Virginia Destroyers this past season.

Shea is one of pro football’s most noted quarterback tutors and has worked with Sam Bradford prior to the 2010 draft and Blaine Gabbert before the 2011 draft.

SR's PICK FOR DEFENSIVE COORDINATOR: KIRBY SMART
Adding Pendry to the Buccaneers staff could bring some additional benefits in the form of Smart, Alabama’s current defensive coordinator. The 36-year old Smart is considered to be one of the best up-and-coming coaches in the college ranks.

He joined the Alabama coaching staff in 2007 and has called the Crimson Tide defense since 2008 under Saban. He also carries the title of assistant head coach. Smart is the highest-paid assistant on the Alabama staff, making $750,000 per year and turning down a similar offer from Georgia, his alma mater, to stay with Saban. It might take a salary of $1 million or so for the Bucs to pry Smart away from Alabama.

Smart was named the winner of the Broyles Award, which is given to the top assistant coach in college football, and he became the first winner from Alabama to claim the honors.

This season, the 2011 Crimson Tide defense leads the nation in all five major categories, including total defense (191.25 ypg.), scoring defense (8.83 ppg.), rushing defense (74.92 ypg.), passing defense (116.33 ypg.) and pass efficiency defense (83.97 rating). Linebacker Dont’a Hightower was a finalist for the Lombardi Award, the Lott Trophy, the Butkus Award and the Bednarik Award.

Smart has helped develop the likes of future pros in defensive backs Robert Lester, Mark Barron and Dre Kirkpatrick, in addition to NFL players like linebacker Rolando McClain, cornerback Javier Arenas, defensive tackle Terrence Cody, defensive end Marcell Darius, safety Rashad Johnson and cornerback Kareem Jackson, who have been drafted over the last couple of years.

Smart does have one year of NFL experience, serving as the Miami Dolphins safeties coach in 2006 under Saban. He is well versed at calling plays for a 3-4 defense, which is a scheme the Buccaneers might switch to if Schottenheimer and/or Smart are hired.

THE REST OF THE PEWTER REPORT GREAT DEBATE:
Tuesday: Eric Dellaratta's choice for Tampa Bay's head coach, offensive coordinator and defensive coordinator
Wednesday: Mark Cook's choice for Tampa Bay's head coach, offensive coordinator and defensive coordinator
Thursday: Andrew Scavelli's choice for Tampa Bay's head coach, offensive coordinator and defensive coordinator

Last modified on Tuesday, 10 January 2012 11:57
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COMMENTS

  • avatar

    Marty would be a good hire given his proven success in the regular season and building teams. I sure hope he has better taste in the OC though. I kind of like Smart, but not too sure if he will be OK calling the plays in the NFL. It is much different than college. Also, not confident about us switching to the 3-4.
  • avatar


    BF47: Welcome back! I must say I missed you. I had a feeling that when things got bad enough we'd hear from you. I hate to say it, but you were right about Raheem. I think we all knew it but were willing to give him a shot. I suspect he will get another opportunity to be a HC eventually. Too much on his plate did him in.
  • avatar

    Yes you are right. Just too many things to juggle. This job should have went to a coach with experience. It's so hard to take over and coach a good team in this league, let alone one that needs so much upgrading across the board. I like Raheem and it's great to see him joining the Redskins. I hope he does well.
  • avatar

    Would the hiring of Marty mean a change to the 3-4? We have spent the last two years drafting for the 4-3. I know every team runs some of both but are we suited to be a 3-4 team with our players? Would Marty allow his DC to run a 4-3 even though he is a 3-4 guy? I hope so, I think Marty is the best choice but maybe not if he wants a 3-4 D
  • avatar

    I am totally excited about getting Marty. I really think this would be the best move for the HC job. All the other coaches dont have any HC experience so i would say we are taking a risk hiring one of those guys. I would say if Marty becomes HC then his son Brian should be the OC. As for the DC maybe Bowles. I am not sure yet but right now im just concerned about the HC.
  • avatar


    Is that the real BF47? I suspect an imposter.
  • avatar

    It's the real BF47 Scu. How you been bro?
  • avatar


    Why not switch to a 3-4 as McCOY is not all that in the 4-3, now might be the right time to change.If there is an extra lineman that we don't need you can always make a trade.
  • avatar

    If they are smart they will hire Marty. They should have hired someone of his caliber to replace Gruden. Someone experienced to handle the rebuilding process. Since they are still in the rebuilding mode this provides opportunity #2 to make the right hire. It's hard enough to coach in the NFL with a good team. Let alone be handed the keys with no experience and have to rebuild a bad one. That's why Raheem failed. He was quote unquote setup to fail in Tampa. He'll bounce back someplace else. This team needs an experienced guy. None have the resume Marty does.
  • avatar

    I totally agree. You and a few others seem to be the only ones that know what they are talking about.
  • avatar

    Wouldn't it be kinda stupid to switch to a 3-4 defense given the draft picks and money invested in McCoy, Price, Bowers, and Clayborn?
  • avatar

    I would love for Marty to be the next HC, I have heard that he is even excited about possibly coaching Tampa. Marty's record in the playoffs isn't great but at least he gets teams there, once you are there anything can happen. I am afraid that the owners will not hire him because he will demand a decent contract and they are more than likely going to try and cheap out on the coaching staff.
  • avatar

    Marty - HC Sherman - OC Phillips - DC do it, do it now.
  • avatar


    I just read Marty is excited to interview for the job. Could it be because he's been gardening for the last five years?
  • avatar


    I didn't think it possible to make a Sherman hire attractive. The Jets can't give Marty Jr. away. They can't give him away. He has a young quarterback in Sanchez in which he has done nothing to make him better. As for his father, there simply isn't enough space. Joe Pendry is nothing more than a retread. Scott, are the Bucs that wild of a group? Are they that undisciplined, ignorant, and lawless? Do we really need baby-sitters? Has anyone taught Blount how to read yet? Kirby Smart? Our "team" just ran roughshod over Morris and now you want to bring in a guy one year older? Scott, I love ya but you are throwing darts my friend.
  • avatar


    Are you serious Scott? Joe Pendry? No way!!!! Of the people they have interviewed or are rumored to interview Marty is my 2nd choice. I still think Zimmer should be the guy despite not having any coaching experience. The difference between he and Rah is miles apart. Zimmer has been a coordinator for many years and he has run some very good defenses. And has a good pedigree having worked under coaches like Parcells. His players seem to love him and respond to him. I think he is ready and probably could get this defense up to speed with minimal changes. And as far as hiring an Offensive Coordinator; how about Tony Sparano who he worked with under Parcells in Dallas. If Sparano isn't available then he can go with Ken Zampese; he has done an excellent job with Dalton has been around some explosive offenses and his father was one of the best. As far as Defensive Coordinator he could go in many different directions since this is his expertise his philosophy and imprints will be all over this side of the ball anyway. If he decides not to handle the chore himself which would be a good idea; he could give one of his position coaches in Cincinnati an opportunity. I like your suggestion of Kirby Smart; he is excellent but how about this guy who may not have been a great Head Coach but is an excellent Defensive Coordinator, his track record speaks for itself and he is available. Butch Davis. So to retrack I like Mike Zimmer- Head Coach, Tony Sparano- Offensive Coordinator and Butch Davis- Defensive Coordinator now if that isn't enough coaching experience for the Bucs then I don't know what to tell them.
  • avatar

    Why not, it's not like we are seriously going to compete for a championship. At least be competitive.
  • avatar


    Seems like posters are 'settling for' Marty. How about the Glazers interview the likes of Clements, Zimmer, Billick, etc? You don't have to be old and experienced to instill discipline. The whole coaching staff was replaced and there are no loyalties, it should be fairly easy.
  • avatar


    I am not sold, but this is an intriguing idea. Marty is not the answer long term, but he could come in here, instill a winning mentality and then groom a coach to take over for him in a few years. I still think Zimmer is the best candidate, but this idea is worth thinking about. Also, it may not take Marty as along to get this team back on track as it might a first time head coach, because his systems and methods are fairly well established.
  • avatar


    If the Glazers look at the poll, they found their man in Marty S. Now, if we can only get that 55% to go to the games!
  • avatar


    I'm on board with Marty. If he can give us five years to fix this mess then move him into being the head of the scouting dept.This is what the Buc's need, a tough coach with experience that will not stand for laying down on the job.The idea of age shold not even factor into this decision. I also like the idea of Smart and Shea being brouht in.They can be called the three S's.
  • avatar

    Anyone catch Leroy Butler interview on Sileo this morning? He gave rave reviews about Mike Sherman saying he is a players coach, from a disciplined West Coast mold, and can really run a steady ship. Coming from an ex FSU/Green Bay great I give weight to these words since he played for him and Holmgren and still had good things to say about him. Interesting...
  • avatar


    SR, you're off your freakin' rocker. Why don't we get DeBerg to come out of retirement too? Marty, AT BEST, is for the right now. That is way short term thinking. He just isn't the answer, sorry. There are better guys out there for the long term.
  • avatar


    I'd still rather have Zimmer but Marty wouldn't be a terrible choice. He's certainly more interesting than Mike (i can make Brett Favre boring) Sherman. I don't know about this idea of bringing in a college DC. That's proven very dicey in the past because the game and players are so different at the pro level.
  • avatar


    I like the move of Schottenheimer as HC but I'm not crazy about the pick for OC. I'm not a fan of Alabama's offense and I'm not sure Schottenheimer would hire a guy he's already fired to do the same job. I like the DC, but only as a 3-4 guy. I absolutely hate the idea of moving to a 3-4 based on the D-linemen we already have who I think are going to be awesome. There has got to be a 4-3 DC out there that Schottenheimer is willing to work with.
  • avatar


    Horse: I'm surprised at your disdain for a fellow member of the Baby Boomer generation who knows a thing or two about long haired hippies. No more dreads; Afros will be the new do of the day. There are men nowadays who work well into their 70's and beyond. Heck, if you're a congressman or judge you get to work until you drop dead on the toilet. The more I considered Marty the more it began to make some sense. He certainly has the track record, knowledge and experience. The question for me was, Does he have the energy? That was answered when I learned that rather than retire after his Chargers job, he continued to coach in the UFL. Now that's having passion for the game. I also think he may be able to attract quality assistants who would be aware of his age and know they could be in line for a field promotion if Marty blows his stack and has a stroke watching our defenders drop interceptions, take bad angles, miss tackles and worst of all have that puzzled look on their faces. I sure like this old bird better than some of the other names being mentioned.
  • avatar


    scubog, of all people you didn't catch my humor? I am fine with Marty, honest I am, but I doubt the Owners will pick him because of his past history of speaking freely about the needs of a team. I think Gruden got fired for that too.
  • avatar


    Horse, are you serious? Tell everyone to get a hair cut? Schottenheimer has worked with young guys all his career, and first of all, we won't be that young in 2012 because a lot of these kids are going bye bye. If anything, well be the 4th or 5th youngest team next year once we bring in some veterans, which if the Glazers are bringing in an experienced coach, you know they will bring in Vets too now. Im actually all in for Marty right now, and we can get a younger coach after a few years when there can be a hand off.
  • avatar


    niko521, it's called humor.
  • avatar


    hello, every time i have commented since the firing i have said marty, he is the man if he would have won one superbowl he would be one of the best coaches of all time. cowher only won one and fisher none. look at marty's coaching tree cowher droppped from it.marty is the answer he has always made a team better than the previous coach oh yeah the browns, chiefs, and chargers all won and made it to the superbowl after he left ha, ha.
  • avatar


    Of all the candidates I like Marty the best, but I am consernd about his age. I really like Kirby as DC, especially after watching Alabama shutout LSU. Hopefully he could keep us in a 4-3. Marty could bring in some good coaches that focus on technique (like Dungy did) and groom one to take over when he steps down. Go Bucs!!
  • avatar


    He's too old and too set in his ways for his style to work now a days. The first thing he will do is to tell everyone to get a haircut and there will be war for some of them to lose their locks. The second thing is that he will speak plainly and bluntly and cuss at them and some of the players will drop down and cry. The third thing is that he will tell the owners that this is now his team and to go away. Nope he's not coming here as HC. He is not our answer.
  • avatar


    Well what is the answer Horse?! All you do is give us extra pieces of a problem. Marty is a good coach. So what about his playoff record. Playoffs is a foreign word around here so at least we'd be at the dance.
  • avatar


    Chi-Town Buc, If it really was Schottenheimer I would be fine with it. Lets all lighten up here . I am for a seasoned anybody whether it is a past HC or even a past HC that is now an OC/DC on a playoff team. Who is it? I have no ideal as I am not doing the interviews. I feel like the time could be right for the return of the 3/4. I believe with the DL we have now, we could make this switch. This would mean that we would have to draft one and maybe two linebackers in the first three rounds.
  • avatar

    MARTY MARTY MARTY I CAN BE A CONTENDER. HOW OLD WAS REGAN?
  • avatar

    Let's go with Marty because despite his age, he would kick some butts around One Buc Palace. 68 is the new 48. Go Bucs!
  • avatar


    well guys why don't we hire this great coach and bring along two other former head coaches too me the Offensive and defensive Coordinator's no matter what they do Iam agreement with it. Fans lets just see what comes down-GO BUCS
  • avatar


    Marty certainly knows how to coach and knows more about running a football operation than everyone combined at all of One Buc . And I heard a rumor that he just bought a home in Sun City.
  • avatar

    If Schotty is the choice, Smart could be good on the DC side of the ball. Someone who would have upside to possibly grow into the HC position. But I am not a fan of Pendry or a UFL OC. There has to be NFL caliber guys we can chose from. We can do better.
  • avatar

    SR, nice job. Well thought out. Marty has always put together a staff of solid coaches. He has the qualities this young Bucs team needs. I'm interested to see the thoughts of Mark, Eric and Andrew. I'm on board with whoever the choice is, but Marty would be the most logical of the experienced former head coaches. I lke the idea of laying the foundation for a younger coach to take over in a few years.
  • avatar


    Ready for Marty Ball...my second choice would be Zimmer. Go Bucs!!!!
  • avatar

    Man, I had no clue Schottenheimer has had such a great career... Why would we not want him as our coach? 68? Big deal... This plan would be perfect... Either one of these OC or DC picks or his son would make for great replacements after Marty used his experience to straighten the Bucs out and get us back on a deciplined and respective road to success... *censored*, if we could get 4 or 5 positive direction years out of him only to be replaced by such grat up and coming coaches would be a dream are you kidding me? I say lock this plan in right now and let's get this party started... And all of you joking about being old are just ridiculous... There's a reason age is a good thing when it comes to leading... It's called experience which is why a lack of it led to the disaster of a situation we are in right now... I vote yes on amendment SR!
  • avatar


    Like the idea of Marty with the younger Shea,and Smart. That way you'd have two eventual replacements when Shott is to old to coach.
  • avatar


    AARP gives a thumbs up to all the Bucs candidates. So pick one of these old codgers already, why dontcha! Down with "youngry", and up with "old and moldy".
  • avatar


    I love the Kirby smart for D coordinator. Great idea Scott
  • avatar


    Nailed it. Would give the franchise instant credibility.
  • avatar


    And the new slogan......Be bold...go old.
  • avatar

    Nice Scott.. Im on this bandwagon too. Keep it coming ......
  • avatar


    All the candidate were let go for some reason, so might as well be Marty. The only problem would be his age. He wouldn't be a long term solution.
  • avatar


    ...unless he becomes the JoePa of the NFL. Oh, I forgot - that was with the SAME team!
  • avatar

    Nice SR! Heating up unlike the Bucs after week 6! Keep up the good work.
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