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    • acacius

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      Post count: 489

      I thought this was interesting:http://www.vox.com/2014/5/7/5683448/how-nfl-teams-ignore-basic-economics-and-draft-players-irrationallyTL;DR version: most teams value high draft picks stupidly and it's almost always worth it to trade down.

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    • Anonymous

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      Post count: 4057

      Massey and Thaler have been looking at the draft for a long time. I’d think they’d stop because it is bound to make their heads hurt how poorly this thing is managed.

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    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 3392

      Massey and Thaler have been looking at the draft for a long time. I'd think they'd stop because it is bound to make their heads hurt how poorly this thing is managed.

      You've got to check Caught in the Draft if you haven't already seen it - it's a decade by decade look at the draft ('64, '74, '84, '94, '04). It's amazing seeing the progression (for example, spring practices used to be a huge factor in scouting because the draft was held in December). One of my favorite parts - it shows how dysfunctional the process can get - is from the '94 draft. The Chiefs had cameras in the room (NFL Films, I guess). They picked 20th I believe, and seemed to have zeroed in on a running back. Schotty was the HC, Carl Peterson was the GM. There was some higher level-exec there too involved in the process (above both). The room was covered with a meticulous board full of names, covered at times by blinds. When they were closing in on their pick, 3 running backs were available (in order of KC's grade): William Floyd, Mario Bates, and Greg Hill. So they are on the clock. Should be Floyd, right? Nope. Schotty wants Hill. Peterson wants Bates. They literally start watching video tapes of cut-ups while on the clock. Eventually the exec pulls Peterson aside and tells him something like, "well, after all, he's got to coach him." So they take Hill. They basically wasted $$$ and tons of time to develop a board that they threw away over "gut" instinct in 15 minutes. Incredible.

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    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 4344

      Caught in the Draft was extremely interesting. the crazy backstories about how things went down and the guys that were taken that you havent heard about since the draft. its also interesting to hear about why guys fell or didnt get draftedthe most interesting one i ever watched was about the 83 draft, i think ESPN did it but it chronicled the whole thing with Elway and all the picks like Chris Hinton and Dan Marino

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    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 2603

      They basically wasted $$$ and tons of time to develop a board that they threw away over "gut" instinct in 15 minutes. Incredible.

      Every BUSINESS does this. My boss wants all kinds of paperwork for a project but when it comes time to do the project most of the plans are worthless. Real life often conflicts with the hypothetical world. I don't see anything wrong with that. :p

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    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 9891

      Massey and Thaler have been looking at the draft for a long time. I'd think they'd stop because it is bound to make their heads hurt how poorly this thing is managed.

      You've got to check Caught in the Draft if you haven't already seen it - it's a decade by decade look at the draft ('64, '74, '84, '94, '04). It's amazing seeing the progression (for example, spring practices used to be a huge factor in scouting because the draft was held in December). One of my favorite parts - it shows how dysfunctional the process can get - is from the '94 draft. The Chiefs had cameras in the room (NFL Films, I guess). They picked 20th I believe, and seemed to have zeroed in on a running back. Schotty was the HC, Carl Peterson was the GM. There was some higher level-exec there too involved in the process (above both). The room was covered with a meticulous board full of names, covered at times by blinds. When they were closing in on their pick, 3 running backs were available (in order of KC's grade): William Floyd, Mario Bates, and Greg Hill. So they are on the clock. Should be Floyd, right? Nope. Schotty wants Hill. Peterson wants Bates. They literally start watching video tapes of cut-ups while on the clock. Eventually the exec pulls Peterson aside and tells him something like, "well, after all, he's got to coach him." So they take Hill. They basically wasted $$$ and tons of time to develop a board that they threw away over "gut" instinct in 15 minutes. Incredible.

      wow

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    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 3392

      They basically wasted $$$ and tons of time to develop a board that they threw away over "gut" instinct in 15 minutes. Incredible.

      Every BUSINESS does this. My boss wants all kinds of paperwork for a project but when it comes time to do the project most of the plans are worthless. Real life often conflicts with the hypothetical world. I don't see anything wrong with that. :p

      That's a fair point. Seems like there is so much low-hanging fruit to improving the process though.

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    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 3392

      Caught in the Draft was extremely interesting. the crazy backstories about how things went down and the guys that were taken that you havent heard about since the draft. its also interesting to hear about why guys fell or didnt get draftedthe most interesting one i ever watched was about the 83 draft, i think ESPN did it but it chronicled the whole thing with Elway and all the picks like Chris Hinton and Dan Marino

      That was really good too. That was one of the 30 for 30 shows. Another of my favorite things from the '64 draft - back then, they didn't have time limits. The Cowboys were on the clock for 9 hours for 2 picks. 3 of it was for Scott Appleton (a TX lineman they traded to the Steelers; he ended up signing with the AFL's Oilers because they promised his family 38 head of cattle - they were ranchers). 6 hours was for Mel Renfro - they had a doctor drive from Portland to Eugene to give him a medical.

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    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 9891

      No doubt that happens in business many times, but I think the real life issue is the draft itself more than a choice between three payers same position.  In other words, I can see that a lot of planning goes out the window when variable picks start flying, but in BR’s story its 3 players and 3 decision-makers presumably ignoring the work of the scouts.  In business that happens too, but I think you also get the occasional “why are we paying them then” voice of reason. Maybe that happens a lot  in the draft room too?It is fascinating

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    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 4344

      not having a time limit is insane. i think teams have too much as it is now

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