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    • michael89156

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      Instead of a developmental league…Why not look to an extended training camp for all NFL franchises?Jerry Angelo  National Football PostJune 13, 2014, 07:00 PM EST.develop_zpsb11a0beb.pngKurt Warner was one of the very few NFL Europe success stories. Recently, talk has increased regarding the NFL and its desire to start a developmental league. This is nothing new given that when NFL Europe was in existence it served the same purpose for approximately 20 years. The reasons for such a league vary beyond the development of players. It allows the NFL to evaluate and develop its officials—which has real merit—and coaches. It can also be used as a tool to expand the product into new markets such as Europe. In terms of finding and developing new talent, that aspect of a developmental league may be overrated. I’ve grown tired of hearing how quarterback Kurt Warner made it because of such a league. If memory serves me correctly, Warner gave as much, if not more credit, to the Arena league as he did NFL Europe. Regardless, is it possible to come up with additional names other than Warner and Jake Delhomme? Considering how many thousands of players have come through these alternative avenues, only a small handful of prospects made a significant impact in the NFL. My point is that you are not going to consistently uncover any real gems. If that were the case, NFL Europe would still be in business. People forget what a ‘Gong Show’ NFL Europe became and, as a result, how it was terminated. There wasn’t one person who fought for it or said that it was a mistake to cancel what turned out to be a cheap imitation of American football. Certainly our European friends weren’t fooled. I’ve seen more fans in the stands at high school games. So moving forward with this concept isn’t new and will probably have the same results in terms of uncovering talent. In terms of player development, I also found that the prospects we sent from our 53-man roster to Europe for development had moderate changes in their growth, if any at all. I can’t remember one player who I said was worth sending over there after all was said and done. What I did find was that the ones we felt might be good enough if they got more playing time didn’t make it. I feel that most teams would also echo this sentiment. We kept track of the players who made it on a 53-man roster following their time overseas. The numbers were low and there were no Kurt Warners other than Kurt Warner. There was a pass rusher who was unassigned (meaning no NFL team had his rights) and got a lot of money to sign with an NFL team, but he turned out to be ‘just a guy.’ Simply put, most NFL teams figure out their players to the point that they know the ones who possess what it takes to have a career in the NFL without farming them out for more playing time experience. The only position that I feel would benefit from an alternative league is quarterback. Quarterbacks have to play and if they aren’t playing on Sunday, it’s hard to develop and evaluate them. If a quarterback does have the luxury of staying with a team and in the same system, he will develop. But that’s a very hard situation to find in the ‘Not For Long’ league. Personally, I feel strongly that the NFL would be better served by having an ongoing training camp during the better part of the NFL season. Players who have been released by NFL teams would make up the roster. I would hold this extended training camp in a warm weather city with an accessible airport (ex: Orlando, Phoenix, Dallas). Additionally, I would find a college campus with fields and facilities in place where the players can be housed during training. I would bring in the top five players who were cut at each position (for the offensive and defensive lines, I would have eight total from both sides). All in all, you would have approximately 50 players at varying positions training during the NFL season.  The league personnel office would determine the selection of these players. They are in the best position to canvas teams and/or have some ex-personnel people view and evaluate tape and make the decisions on who they want to invite to their site to train. There would be no restrictions. These are the best players, young and old. When teams lose a veteran player, they like to replace him with a veteran player. Without a training camp during the season, the longer the season goes, the less attractive these veteran types become. This is due to the fact that they have been sitting for so long and are no longer in football shape. While training, these players will be evaluated as well. The personnel people responsible for training the prospects will write up reports on them each week. The reports and tapes of all the sessions would be on file for teams to read and watch at any time. When a team loses a player, they can go right to the training facility and sign one if they so choose. The most difficult situation for teams to address during the regular season is when they incur injuries around the halfway point and beyond. Teams have their ‘short list’ (players on the street that teams have prioritized at each position), yet these players haven’t been in pads for over two months and many of them have already been signed by other teams who suffered their injuries early in the season. This can really put teams behind the proverbial eight ball. What usually happens is that an organization will bring in a player who is out of shape and, thus, prone to suffer an injury (ex: hamstring). By conducting an ongoing in-season training camp, these same players would be kept in good football shape. They will be on a schedule just as if they were on a team in terms of training them in the weight room and conditioning them outdoors. They will also do on-field drill and technique work in pads, which would be taped. AGAIN, these tapes would be on file for any NFL team to view and evaluate in the event they want to sign a prospect, regardless if they have a need to fill or not. Once a prospect is signed to an active or practice roster, if eligible, another player at that position will be brought in. This type of camp has real merit for teams because they have players who are professionally trained and ready to go. The camp would start in Week 3 of the NFL season. The reason for this start date is that most teams will have a strong pool of players to pick from in those first few weeks of the season, should they incur a severe injury to one of their own players. The camp would run for approximately 14 weeks, one week past the final regular season game. Teams that make the playoffs will still have the advantage of going into the pool of players if need be. Right now the only reserve pool viable for teams late in the season is their own practice roster players. These are primarily young and, in most cases, inexperienced prospects. But even with these practice rosters, a team only has nine players to choose from. What if a team has an injury at a position and they have no player on the practice roster at that same position to move up? The beauty of this type of camp is that you already have veterans working out. Say a number of teams requested that a player be brought in, worked out and evaluated. The camp could accommodate such a request. A team could cut a player at that position or just add one more at any time, as there would be a lot of flexibility. The camp is there to improve the quality of play for all teams. I strongly feel that this concept has real merit and would serve everybody’s best interest. Once the season starts, the best thing you can do for all teams is have a quality pool of players available. When the NFL featured only 28 teams, the pool of available players to choose from was pretty solid. But when the league expanded to 32 franchises, approximately 200 players were removed from that pool. This is a supply vs. demand business and the demand is for talented players who have some experience. As a franchise, one of the toughest aspects of the job to deal with regards in-season injuries. No one knows when they are going to happen or who they will happen to. That’s why it’s paramount that there is a system in place that can assist teams when they have a real emergency. Follow Jerry on Twitter: @RealJerryAngelo Jerry Angelo was the General Manager of the Chicago Bears from 2001 to 2012. Prior to joining the Bears, Angelo spent 14 years overseeing the Tampa Bay Buccaneers' scouting department as their Director of Player Personnel. Angelo graduated from Miami University in 1971.

    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 2847

          Injuries are the wildcard here, and always will be. Training camps used to be much longer, but today, for good or bad, the CBA rules. Expanding each team’s practice squad IMO would be a great idea…

    • Anonymous

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      Post count: 3027

      I agree NDY. I think it’ll be very tough to have a true developmental league with how violent a game Football is. When the average players career is somewhere in the range of 4 years, it doesn’t leave a lot of time to slowly develop your craft. Besides that, we’re seeing younger and younger playings that are more prepared to play on the NFL level.

    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 10626

      Not a bad idea.

    • vlagatta

      Member
      Post count: 2638

      I missed this over the weekend since I wasn’t here.I've had an opinion on this for years, and it has nothing to do with "developmental" issues, and everything to do with the fact that with all it's scientific calibrations, formulas, testing and retesting, the HUGE FLAW is the NFL Draft itself.  If it was in any other industry, the way they approach "evaluating talent" in the NFL would have been dumped a long time ago.  Years later, in many instances, we learn that all too often  what we were told was first round talent ended up being third round talent, and in many instances some third round talent ended up being first.  The entire system the NFL uses to judge talent needs improving, because the real result seems to be that a lot of studs end up being duds, and many duds somehow miraculously become studs.

    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 2603

      I missed this over the weekend since I wasn't here.I've had an opinion on this for years, and it has nothing to do with "developmental" issues, and everything to do with the fact that with all it's scientific calibrations, formulas, testing and retesting, the HUGE FLAW is the NFL Draft itself.  If it was in any other industry, the way they approach "evaluating talent" in the NFL would have been dumped a long time ago.  Years later, in many instances, we learn that all too often  what we were told was first round talent ended up being third round talent, and in many instances some third round talent ended up being first.  The entire system the NFL uses to judge talent needs improving, because the real result seems to be that a lot of studs end up being duds, and many duds somehow miraculously become studs.

      If there was a surefire way to improve the draft they would have done it or you'd be a millionaire having invented and sold your idea to the NFL. In the end the best it can be is a gamble. It's like that for every employer across the world. You have no idea how someone will work out until you bring them on board and see how they work out. They might be a great talent but fail because of the environment of your company aka Steve Young.

    • vlagatta

      Member
      Post count: 2638

      If there was a surefire way to improve the draft they would have done it or you'd be a millionaire having invented and sold your idea to the NFL.

      Brother that is crazy if you truly believe their system is as perfect as it can be.

    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 2603

      If there was a surefire way to improve the draft they would have done it or you'd be a millionaire having invented and sold your idea to the NFL.

      Brother that is crazy if you truly believe their system is as perfect as it can be.

      Yet you can't offer anything that would improve it. That's the crazy part! If you make a claim be ready to back it brother.

    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 4623

      If they just want to give jobs to lesser quality football players and fill some summer TV programming during slow times, fine, but I don’t get the reason behind a “developmental” league. By and large, the best players are the best players because they’re just studs and have been studs their whole lives. The amount of good NFL players who truly needed development is very small.

    • Anonymous

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      Post count: 2603

      If they just want to give jobs to lesser quality football players and fill some summer TV programming during slow times, fine, but I don't get the reason behind a "developmental" league. By and large, the best players are the best players because they're just studs and have been studs their whole lives. The amount of good NFL players who truly needed development is very small.

      Did you just say Glennon is doomed?

    • Anonymous

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      Post count: 894

      IMHO, the NFL should have bought the Arena Football League. Why? Look no further than Kurt Warner. The AFL taught him today’s NFL uptempo game, ‘The Greatest Show on Turf’. Man they were electric. Buy then expand to 32 cities and groom coaches, management, players, refs, technology, innovation in offensive and defensive schemes, etc. No need  for a PS or for that matter, the friggin inactives every Sunday. Allow the AFL players to get called up on a moments notice just like MLB and other players can be sent down. It makes too much sense to me, so it won’t happen.

    • vlagatta

      Member
      Post count: 2638

      If there was a surefire way to improve the draft they would have done it or you'd be a millionaire having invented and sold your idea to the NFL.

      Brother that is crazy if you truly believe their system is as perfect as it can be.

      Yet you can't offer anything that would improve it. That's the crazy part! If you make a claim be ready to back it brother.

      I'm not exactly sure how you were raised or where you were educated but that has to be the most defeatist thing I have seen on a message board.  "If you don't offer a specific cure, then it cannot be cured"  really?  Good luck with everything pal.

    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 2603

      If there was a surefire way to improve the draft they would have done it or you'd be a millionaire having invented and sold your idea to the NFL.

      Brother that is crazy if you truly believe their system is as perfect as it can be.

      Yet you can't offer anything that would improve it. That's the crazy part! If you make a claim be ready to back it brother.

      I'm not exactly sure how you were raised or where you were educated but that has to be the most defeatist thing I have seen on a message board.  "If you don't offer a specific cure, then it cannot be cured"  really?  Good luck with everything pal.

      You specified the process could be improved. HOW? If you aren't part of the SOLUTION you are part of the PROBLEM. I guess you just like being part of a problem which you say exists but can't support or provide anything on it. How did you identify it as a problem? What's inherently wrong that needs to be fixed? I realize you're new here but put up or shut up.

    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 534

      Bring back!!!!!!!!!!!xfl%20logo.jpg

    • vlagatta

      Member
      Post count: 2638

      ::::forget about political correctness and stop drafting quarterbacks with good feet and hands and the IQ of a squid, by using easy mental aptitude tests….and start really testing their ability to show they have the intelligence needed for the position:::::::oh, and the wonderlic  is a joke::::if I'm going to invest 60M in some kid....I want something a tad bit more substantial than this:    http://espn.go.com/page2/s/closer/020228test.htmlthe attention paid to 40 times is crapI'll keep adding to this periodically all season.

    • Anonymous

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      Post count: 2603

      You specified the process could be improved. HOW? If you aren't part of the SOLUTION you are part of the PROBLEM. I guess you just like being part of a problem which you say exists but can't support or provide anything on it. How did you identify it as a problem? What's inherently wrong that needs to be fixed? I realize you're new here but put up or shut up.

      Oh hell, this just got even better.  Since I did not yet offer a solution, MayHump now thinks it's my personal fault that the NFL draft is not as good as it can be.  MayHump, I'm going to guess that you're around 12 or 13 so I will be kind.  I know this may shock you, but I'm not an executive at the NFL, so I really have no say in how they go about their day to day business.  Additionally, this is a message board.  These are discussions. We analyze, we critique. That's what goes on here.  But you should know, NONE of it is ever filtered up to the NFL for changes and modifications, OK lil' guy?  PS:  Be ready, I may just open a car thread in Off Topic.  I may even complain about the quality of my SiriusXM signal, but in no way should you expect me to discuss ways that they can improve their signal.  mmmk?

      Personal attacks? Don't bother trying to guess ages when you've set your own by actions. I know it's tough when you get called out but grow a pair. You won't rattle anyone's cage here trying this weak sauce. If anything you'll get the hornets on your six. Thanks for the amusement though. Playtime is over for now but same Bat time same Bat channel tomorrow. Let's see if we can't raise your post count some more while providing people some laughs.

    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 534

      If the NFL really decides to start a development league, Europe would be a good place to put it.

    • vlagatta

      Member
      Post count: 2638

      Personal attacks? Don't bother trying to guess ages when you've set your own by actions. I know it's tough when you get called out but grow a pair. You won't rattle anyone's cage here trying this weak sauce. If anything you'll get the hornets on your six. Thanks for the amusement though. Playtime is over for now but same Bat time same Bat channel tomorrow. Let's see if we can't raise your post count some more while providing people some laughs.

      babygurl's  mad.

    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 2603

      Personal attacks? Don't bother trying to guess ages when you've set your own by actions. I know it's tough when you get called out but grow a pair. You won't rattle anyone's cage here trying this weak sauce. If anything you'll get the hornets on your six. Thanks for the amusement though. Playtime is over for now but same Bat time same Bat channel tomorrow. Let's see if we can't raise your post count some more while providing people some laughs.

      babygurl's  mad.

      I'd guess it's been 20-25 years since I was mad. I'd rip your head off and **CENSORED** down your neck if I was mad. This is 100% entertainment for me. You put a twisted smile on my face seeing your funny responses. Bravo!https://www.pewterreport.com/Boards/index.php/topic,1316933.0.html

    • vlagatta

      Member
      Post count: 2638

    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 2015

      Ignoring the personal grudge match being waged above, I think the idea presented by Angelo is pretty solid, and one of the better solutions I've read.

    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 10626

      I missed this over the weekend since I wasn't here.I've had an opinion on this for years, and it has nothing to do with "developmental" issues, and everything to do with the fact that with all it's scientific calibrations, formulas, testing and retesting, the HUGE FLAW is the NFL Draft itself.  If it was in any other industry, the way they approach "evaluating talent" in the NFL would have been dumped a long time ago.  Years later, in many instances, we learn that all too often  what we were told was first round talent ended up being third round talent, and in many instances some third round talent ended up being first.  The entire system the NFL uses to judge talent needs improving, because the real result seems to be that a lot of studs end up being duds, and many duds somehow miraculously become studs.

      Its not an exact science and never will be.  Part of the problem is, there is no way to measure heart, inspiration, and ambition. Also,  they have already dealt with the fact its a crapshoot. The new CBA put a stop to the Ryan Leafs of the world. Now, you may get burned by a bad 1st round pick, but not nearly as bad as before. And its not just the NFL's problem. The other major sports have just as many bust players.  Last year the Cavs drafted Anthony Bennet with the #1 pick in the entire draft. And the guy sucked so bad there was talk of sending him to the D-league. Even he said it would probably be a good idea.

    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 2015

      I missed this over the weekend since I wasn't here.I've had an opinion on this for years, and it has nothing to do with "developmental" issues, and everything to do with the fact that with all it's scientific calibrations, formulas, testing and retesting, the HUGE FLAW is the NFL Draft itself.  If it was in any other industry, the way they approach "evaluating talent" in the NFL would have been dumped a long time ago.  Years later, in many instances, we learn that all too often  what we were told was first round talent ended up being third round talent, and in many instances some third round talent ended up being first.  The entire system the NFL uses to judge talent needs improving, because the real result seems to be that a lot of studs end up being duds, and many duds somehow miraculously become studs.

      Its not an exact science and never will be.  Part of the problem is, there is no way to measure heart, inspiration, and ambition. Also,  they have already dealt with the fact its a crapshoot. The new CBA put a stop to the Ryan Leafs of the world. Now, you may get burned by a bad 1st round pick, but not nearly as bad as before. And its not just the NFL's problem. The other major sports have just as many bust players.  Last year the Cavs drafted Anthony Bennet with the #1 pick in the entire draft. And the guy sucked so bad there was talk of sending him to the D-league. Even he said it would probably be a good idea.

      Excellent points all the way through.

    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 2603

      https://www.pewterreport.com/Boards/index.php/topic,1316933.0.html

      Yeah, that worked well.

      Yes it did. Your idea was a FLOP! I'd love to hear more of your ideas.

    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 2603

      I missed this over the weekend since I wasn't here.I've had an opinion on this for years, and it has nothing to do with "developmental" issues, and everything to do with the fact that with all it's scientific calibrations, formulas, testing and retesting, the HUGE FLAW is the NFL Draft itself.  If it was in any other industry, the way they approach "evaluating talent" in the NFL would have been dumped a long time ago.  Years later, in many instances, we learn that all too often  what we were told was first round talent ended up being third round talent, and in many instances some third round talent ended up being first.  The entire system the NFL uses to judge talent needs improving, because the real result seems to be that a lot of studs end up being duds, and many duds somehow miraculously become studs.

      Its not an exact science and never will be.  Part of the problem is, there is no way to measure heart, inspiration, and ambition. Also,  they have already dealt with the fact its a crapshoot. The new CBA put a stop to the Ryan Leafs of the world. Now, you may get burned by a bad 1st round pick, but not nearly as bad as before. And its not just the NFL's problem. The other major sports have just as many bust players.  Last year the Cavs drafted Anthony Bennet with the #1 pick in the entire draft. And the guy sucked so bad there was talk of sending him to the D-league. Even he said it would probably be a good idea.

      It's a problem that plagues all businesses across the world. There's no way to gauge an employee before you see them in action. They might have been the best employee ever at their last company but a flop at their new job. No one knows how stuff will work out. It's always going to be a gamble. The NFL Draft is no different then IBM hiring a new employee when it comes down to it. A company has a 90 day probation period where the NFL has a rookie pay scale but both are there to help mitigate lemon employees.

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