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    • SappAttack

      Participant
      Post count: 446

      One of the first things offensive coordinators should ask rookie QBs after the draft is which types of plays/formations etc were you most comfortable with in college? What brought you the most success?In addition to asking the QB, they should obviously review the tape.If you were the offensive coordinator, what would you incorporate more of into the offense knowing what you know from Winston's college tape?Being a socal resident, I only saw a handful of Winston's nationally televised games. So I am curious to know what he excelled at. I actually saw a lot more of Mariota's tape on the PAC-12 network and local programming again UCLA/SC etcThanks.

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    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 8096

      I’d say…Short dump off passes to RBs... TE passes just about anywhere over the LOS... and jump balls to tall WRs.  In that order.

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    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 2673

      To bad our OL sucks ass so instead all we get to see is rushed flutter throws and looks of desperation and frustration on Jameis’ face just about every (censored)ing play.

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    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 253

      Plays that get the #1 receiver wide open.  Long jump balls to our guys who will simply dominate the poor kid trying to cover them. I'm kind of an ACC fan but let's be honest, even though they (ACC) had a ton of draft picks, on the whole FSU's WRs usually had a decided talent advantage. Seems like he had a funny habit of really just getting to work in the second half. So I'm sorry I don't have a good football answer to your question, but I'm not sure there is one. The situation he enjoyed in college simply doesn't translate well to the NFL. He just has to get more selective. Kind of learn what he can't do more than what he should try to do in the NFL. That's just something he and the ocord will figure out together. I don't think you can get much from his college tape. Maybe move those target windows a little bit.

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    • johnd

      Participant
      Post count: 333

      I would say having superior talent to your opponents in pretty much all areas is why FSU was successful.  The Bucs should do that! 

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    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 8983

      Since we cannot have him actually be fast, make the system faster. No-huddle, up-tempo.And given his arm strength, i think you could play him in shotgun the majority of the game. Keep him safer, and give him more field vision presnap. And, even though it is shotgun, i would have the wideouts playing pretty close and make them earn some YAC down the line.What he did in college is not too translatable where he is at right now. So i dont think you worry so much about his college days. E.g. his play needs to change, as well as the system he is in, for him to succeed. He's just too slow for three steps. And five steps seems almost the same, but plus some phantom pressure.Imo, in pros, the shotgun is probably his best bet. Keep him safe, and everyone in front of him.

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    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 8096

      The Aguayo Option was pretty good, too…

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    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 504

      To bad our OL sucks ass so instead all we get to see is rushed flutter throws and looks of desperation and frustration on Jameis' face just about every (censored)ing play.

      In reality the O'line has played well, all things considered.

      Please wait…

    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 177

      Let me first say that I think a lot of JW’s early struggles are simply growing pains. Remember, at FSU, JW had a year to learn while playing scout team QB against some of the best defenders in the country.  Few “game day” defenses he saw the next two years were as good as what he was seeing in practice.  I’d argue the opposite is true now, and the numbers bear that out.  He is being asked to make NFL throws into tight windows to a receiving corps known more for physicality than speed, which means JW has a smaller room for error and is somewhat reliant on his receivers winning the battles at the point of contact.  His head is spinning with the speed of the game, which is normal, and, as a result, his accuracy and decision-making is suspect right now. He was special at the college level due to his ability to throw receivers open, and I think he is struggling because the “windows” he sees are closing much quicker, or are not developing because the defenses are faster and better.  Historically, this is to be expected.  You combat the learning curve of a pocket passer with run-heavy play calling, easy reads, easy targets, and leaning heavily on the defense.  I am not seeing much of that right now.  It sounds like we may be seeing more shotgun and hurry up this week, which is probably a good sign, and I believe one that plays into JW’s success at FSU.  If we wanted to incorporate even more of FSU’s scheme to ease JW’s transition, this is how I would see it playing out  At FSU, Winston had diverse weapons and used the entire field.  He played a lot from the shotgun (though not exclusively), and, though not a spread offense, relied heavily on using the entire field to exploit the defense.  FSU an offense based on dependable receiving options out of the backfield (swing passes and dump offs to Freeman and Cook), a dependable tight end that was used down the seam and as a safety valve (O'Leary), a speed option that could either stretch the field or work the slot (Shaw and Greene), and a big-bodied, jump ball type (Benjamin).  Watch the highlights from the 2013 season and you will see a QB making all the throws spreading the ball around and exploiting matchups. It was a lot like the fast break offense FSU ran with Charlie Ward in that it relied heavily on speed and space, but it also had a vertical component to open up the underneath routes.  This puts a pretty good historical perspective on who he was during 2013:http://espn.go.com/blog/statsinfo/post/_/id/79563/stats-to-know-winstons-amazing-numbersThe Bucs run a much different look.  Gone are the swing passes out of the backfield.  He has little or no production out of the TEs, and he has very little speed to work with vertically or out of the slot.  He currently has two identical receiving weapons (Evans and VJax), one of whom is hurt and both of whom have been inconsistent with drops.  To fit what FSU does, he would benefit greatly from a shifty pass catcher out of the backfield (Martin fits the bill, but doesn't see a lot of pass plays his direction), better tight end play (ASJ is hurt and Myers is awful), and a speed option at WR.  Not a lot to ask for, right?The thing that will benefit him the most, though, is time - both from protection and experience.  If there is one thing we can take from his FSU days is that he is capable of making all the throws and all the reads.  Few have done it better.  He has the tools and the work ethic to do what Koetter wants him to do.  For those that haven't seen it, look at the highlights of the Notre Dame game from last season, and you will see a QB that lit up a very aggressive defense, in the face of extreme pressure, with pinpoint vertical throws of the type that Koetter's offense is based upon.  Winston was 15-of-16 for 181 yards and a TD in the second half, with three TD drives that covered at least 70 yards.  Here is a link to the highlights, though it doesn't do the game (especially the second half) justice:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LS67Rsjuk0k  I am a firm believer that he will get there in time.  The growing pains suck, but he is definitely one of the ones that we want to be developing. 

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    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 2862

      Let me first say that I think a lot of JW's early struggles are simply growing pains. Remember, at FSU, JW had a year to learn while playing scout team QB against some of the best defenders in the country.  Few "game day" defenses he saw the next two years were as good as what he was seeing in practice.  I'd argue the opposite is true now, and the numbers bear that out.  He is being asked to make NFL throws into tight windows to a receiving corps known more for physicality than speed, which means JW has a smaller room for error and is somewhat reliant on his receivers winning the battles at the point of contact.  His head is spinning with the speed of the game, which is normal, and, as a result, his accuracy and decision-making is suspect right now. He was special at the college level due to his ability to throw receivers open, and I think he is struggling because the "windows" he sees are closing much quicker, or are not developing because the defenses are faster and better.  Historically, this is to be expected.  You combat the learning curve of a pocket passer with run-heavy play calling, easy reads, easy targets, and leaning heavily on the defense.  I am not seeing much of that right now.  It sounds like we may be seeing more shotgun and hurry up this week, which is probably a good sign, and I believe one that plays into JW's success at FSU.  If we wanted to incorporate even more of FSU's scheme to ease JW's transition, this is how I would see it playing out  At FSU, Winston had diverse weapons and used the entire field.  He played a lot from the shotgun (though not exclusively), and, though not a spread offense, relied heavily on using the entire field to exploit the defense.  FSU an offense based on dependable receiving options out of the backfield (swing passes and dump offs to Freeman and Cook), a dependable tight end that was used down the seam and as a safety valve (O'Leary), a speed option that could either stretch the field or work the slot (Shaw and Greene), and a big-bodied, jump ball type (Benjamin).  Watch the highlights from the 2013 season and you will see a QB making all the throws spreading the ball around and exploiting matchups. It was a lot like the fast break offense FSU ran with Charlie Ward in that it relied heavily on speed and space, but it also had a vertical component to open up the underneath routes.  This puts a pretty good historical perspective on who he was during 2013:http://espn.go.com/blog/statsinfo/post/_/id/79563/stats-to-know-winstons-amazing-numbersThe Bucs run a much different look.  Gone are the swing passes out of the backfield.  He has little or no production out of the TEs, and he has very little speed to work with vertically or out of the slot.  He currently has two identical receiving weapons (Evans and VJax), one of whom is hurt and both of whom have been inconsistent with drops.  To fit what FSU does, he would benefit greatly from a shifty pass catcher out of the backfield (Martin fits the bill, but doesn't see a lot of pass plays his direction), better tight end play (ASJ is hurt and Myers is awful), and a speed option at WR.  Not a lot to ask for, right?The thing that will benefit him the most, though, is time - both from protection and experience.  If there is one thing we can take from his FSU days is that he is capable of making all the throws and all the reads.  Few have done it better.  He has the tools and the work ethic to do what Koetter wants him to do.  For those that haven't seen it, look at the highlights of the Notre Dame game from last season, and you will see a QB that lit up a very aggressive defense, in the face of extreme pressure, with pinpoint vertical throws of the type that Koetter's offense is based upon.  Winston was 15-of-16 for 181 yards and a TD in the second half, with three TD drives that covered at least 70 yards.  Here is a link to the highlights, though it doesn't do the game (especially the second half) justice:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LS67Rsjuk0k  I am a firm believer that he will get there in time.  The growing pains suck, but he is definitely one of the ones that we want to be developing.

      Not enough hyperbole to satiate the proles.

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    • Anonymous

      Inactive
      Post count: 2673

      To bad our OL sucks ass so instead all we get to see is rushed flutter throws and looks of desperation and frustration on Jameis' face just about every (censored)ing play.

      In reality the O'line has played well, all things considered.

      They rank bottom ten in sacks allowed &  bottom FIVE in penalties committed per game. In what world does that describe a unit that has performed 'well'?

      Please wait…

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