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    • Anonymous

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      Post count: 21933

      In fact, its a huge issue throughout Europehttp://prosoccertalk.nbcsports.com/2014/04/27/watch-dani-alves-perfectly-dismissive-reaction-to-racist-banana-tosswatch-dani-alves-perfectly-dismissive-reaction-to-racist-banana-toss/

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    • Anonymous

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      Post count: 395

      Being different is hardly a US-only problem. I try to replace the word racism with the “different” to see if it fits and most of the time it does. I dont know the culture in other countries and how race plays out but I can imagine that the minorities usually get the short end of the stick by the religious majority. The religious are usually the kind of people with the inferiority complex and feel the need to project their own insecurity onto those they feel are inferior to them. Here in the U.S., diversity is apart of our foundation however there is a majority race and there are minority races and the double standard in how people are treated has existed as long as the country has. Slave owners suggesting all men are equal. White southern baptist preachers usuing their authority/influence to impress upon their people that blacks are biologically inferior to them and that by Gods will, they are superior and made to rule over them. In other countries racism may not have the same root cause and may not elicit the same emotion/sensativity as it does here but it is played out in our fears the same and we respond in kind. Some are above that kind of juvenile thinking, some are not.

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    • Anonymous

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      Post count: 831

      Racism is structure in most other countries….  it quite literally is the way of life.  My girlfriend, for example, is from Peru. I went with her to visit family last Christmas. The darker people worked in the house, cooked the food, and did the chores. In return they were given food, a small shack to sleep in in the back of the house, and were paid a little bit of money for some very basic things in life (clothes, a cell phone, shoes, etc.). They were not allowed to sit with us and talk or watch TV with us unless they were given permission by us to do so. This was a real culture shock for me to come from America and the next day I am seeing almost, you know, slavery, right in front of my face. As time went by I realized that this was not happening in the house I was visiting….. I would quickly realize that this was they way things were in Peru. Everywhere I turned the lighter hispanic people were ‘in charge’ of things and were the ones driving the nice cars and wearing the nice clothes. While the darker natives were always the ones who were wearing tattered clothes, doing hard manual labor, and/or picking trash up off the street. The darker people wouldn’t even look you in the face. They were used to being ordered around and forbidden to question anything that they were told. And thats just how things were.Also, from what I've heard about India's cast system, its kind of the same thing. The darker people usually reside in the lower casts and are therefore profiled as the scum of the country because of their skin color. They usually are either living in a rich lighter-skinned person's house as a "houseworker" or are living in some unsanitary disease ridden slum.  Also interesting to me, in China, people purposefully avoid the sun and use umbrellas when it is very sunny outside because being dark is shameful. Being dark almost guarantees that you are going to be shunned by the lighter-skinned upper class. If you do have darker skin, you are probably some poor worker/slave with no social rights and have no opportunity for advancement in the work place. Dark-skinned people in those countries are truly  disenfranchised. My visit to Peru was an eye opening experience. For all the complaining about equal rights that goes on in this country, I swear, some people just don't know how lucky they are to be living in the USA.

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