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    • michael89156

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      Lovie Smith can learn from Greg Schiano's failed gamble with Bucs Andrew Astleford FOX Sports FloridaJUN 12, 2014  6:02pm lovie_zps8559d63c.pngKim Klement / USA TODAY Sports Though often appearing calm and collected, Bucs coach Lovie Smith has made serious moves to mold the team in his image. TAMPA, Fla. -- Since Lovie Smith's hire in January, he has been cast as the anti-Greg Schiano, a man who arrived to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers with a proven NFL pedigree and a tame demeanor that stands in contrast to the toes-on-the-line perception of the failed Schiano era. But initial impressions are deceiving when considering the man charged to lift the Bucs to national relevance. Smith, in reality, is more like Schiano than most realize. Shared aggression is the reason why. Consider: With their mandatory minicamp closing Thursday afternoon, the Bucs have lived a wild transformation since Smith declared that they had "unfinished business" when he was introduced as Schiano's successor Jan. 6. Since, players who failed to fit Smith's vision -- for a variety of reasons, financial and otherwise -- were jettisoned in a swift manner that showed his urgency. Among the key names to depart and find new homes: cornerback Darrelle Revis (New England Patriots), wide receiver Mike Williams (Buffalo Bills), guard Davin Joseph (St. Louis Rams) and offensive tackle Donald Penn (Oakland Raiders). Certainly, Schiano's was more outward with his aggression. He dropped hints in news conferences at his discomfort with quarterback Josh Freeman, before an ugly divorce with the former franchise face lifted rookie backup Mike Glennon to the starting role. Schiano was vocal on the practice fields. He became an easy target for fans last season, because his bulldog persona soured people when the Bucs became swamped in losing and public follies. Smith, meanwhile, is a different man. He appears quiet and collected. He was hard to notice on the field during offseason practice sessions. The way he carries himself creates the impression that he's more confident that his methods will earn NFL players' respect, something that Schiano struggled to accomplish. "I really don't look back an awful lot," Smith said Thursday about the Bucs' change. "A lot of change has happened, of course, I know that. But it just always seems like it's always the next day and, 'What can we do with that?' And that's where we are right now. We had a successful offseason program. But now, it's about that next step. I can't wait for training camp." Aggression binds both men, though their styles are dissimilar. Schiano's aggression was more public. Smith's is subtler, found in the Bucs' roster turnover and breakneck change of the franchise's culture. Make no mistake: Aggression is necessary for an NFL coach's survival. Aggression creates legends, from Vince Lombardi to Don Shula. Aggression creates Super Bowl champions, from the Green Bay Packers of the late 1960s to the modern-day Seattle Seahawks. Aggression can also become a major gamble. Smith's aggressive approach to remaking the Bucs comes with major questions. What if quarterback Josh McCown, who has just 15 touchdown passes in the NFL since 2008, falls short of expectations and looks every bit of a soon-to-be 35-year-old? What if Glennon doesn't have the mental strength to be the Bucs' quarterback of the future? What if an offensive line transformation, one that should include injured guard Carl Nicks, fails to contain defenses? What if new offensive coordinator Jeff Tedford, never before an NFL coach, struggles to adapt to how the game is played at its most elite level? We've already seen what happens when good intentions go wrong. Schiano's aggression became a failed gamble. He gambled that the Bucs' locker room would grow to respect his hardline ways. He gambled that Revis would be the "final piece" to lift the Bucs to contention in the NFC South. He gambled that the move from Freeman to Glennon would produce returns quick enough -- or buy him enough time -- to survive at least one more season. It's wise, then, to view Smith not as Schiano's opposite but as someone driven by the same desire: To succeed fast, with the team taking on his personality, in a league where a coach is given precious little grace time to figure out his landscape. Smith will pay the same price as Schiano if he fails. "Nowadays, there's no rebuilding and 'Hey, guys. You're making progress,'" Smith said. "Nobody wants to hear about all that. That process has to speed up fairly quick." Still, Smith can learn from what led to Schiano's demise. Too often, Schiano appeared inflexible, unwilling to adapt to his players and the trials of the moment. Some of the Bucs' best days of 2013 came in winning four of five games from Weeks 10 through 14, when Schiano seemed looser and more relaxed in the public eye after keeping his job following a 0-8 start. But he adjusted too late. Smith must be wiser with how he adapts to the ebbs and flows of his new role. His knowledge of the franchise as a former linebackers coach under Tony Dungy should help. So should lessons gained from his nine seasons leading the Chicago Bears, which included a Super Bowl appearance in the 2006 campaign. Smith's aggression, unlike Schiano's, was tested in the NFL before arriving in Tampa. Schiano's two years here served as a chemistry lab for his ambition. Smith, meanwhile, has had time at multiple stops since entering the league in 1996 to fine-tune his philosophy. Still, there are no guarantees Smith will succeed. Like with Schiano, another man who arrived with an aggressive plan to shape the future, time will show if Smith's influence translates to success. You can follow Andrew Astleford on Twitter @aastleford or email him at aastleford@gmail.com.

    • Anonymous

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      This is kind of a stretch, comparing Schiano to Smith is really more like contrasting a apple and a orange. Yes, because they are both football coaches, you can find some common ground, but basically they are quite different.My problem last season with Schiano is that he wasn't able to use his players effectively on Sunday's and failed time and again to make reasonable adjustments at halftime when it was clear that changes needed to be made. In short, Schiano wasn't a good NFL coach. He had a vision, and even if he didn't have the players to play it, he was damn well going to stay true to his vision. When you listened to Schiano, you just didn't feel confident that he knew what he had to do to win football games. OTOH, listening to Smith, he just gives off a calm confidence that things are going in the correct direction. Anyway, I'm tired about talking about Schiano ... old news.

    • Anonymous

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      Smith – 81-63 in the NFLSchiano - 11-21 in the NFL                  68-67 in collegeTotally similar.

    • Anonymous

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      I’m just glad Lovie doesn’t have Dominik getting in his way…

    • Anonymous

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      They both have whistles and want to win. That’s about where the similarities end.

    • Anonymous

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      They both have whistles and want to win. That's about where the similarities end.

      Don't forget that they both think Glennon is the future.

    • Anonymous

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      They both have whistles and want to win. That's about where the similarities end.

      Don't forget that they both think Glennon is the future.

      45260093.jpg

    • brycen54

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      Post count: 636

      And they both got accused of a bunch of crap they didn't do by our more idiotic fans.Oh, wait, that was just Schiano.

    • Anonymous

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      And they both got accused of a bunch of crap they didn't do by our more idiotic fans.Oh, wait, that was just Schiano.

      Thanks for your comments, Greg. Now go back to Rutgers.  :P

    • Anonymous

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      And they both got accused of a bunch of crap they didn't do by our more idiotic fans.Oh, wait, that was just Schiano.

      11-21...thats all I accused him of and plenty reason.

    • Anonymous

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      Really?  Lovie wants toes on the line?

    • brycen54

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      The strict disciplinarian approach is classic team building psychology to weed out the non team orientated players. The majority of that job was already finished and no longer necessary.Most of you guys could learn a lot from boot camp.

    • Anonymous

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      The strict disciplinarian approach is classic team building psychology to weed out the non team orientated players. The majority of that job was already finished and no longer necessary.Most of you guys could learn a lot from boot camp.

      That part I agree with.  We had a lot of poor attitude guys prior to Schiano's arrival.  While I dont think he is a very good play caller or in game adjuster, I will give him credit for cleaning out a lot of dead weight.

    • Anonymous

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      The strict disciplinarian approach is classic team building psychology to weed out the non team orientated players. The majority of that job was already finished and no longer necessary.Most of you guys could learn a lot from boot camp.

      I agree with your comment, but were you in the military?

    • Anonymous

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      The trick to being a good football coach is to make discipline fun, like what Jon Gruden did. He was a yelling hard a$$ whom the players loved playing for and he won a lot of games. Schiano made discipline not fun.

    • Anonymous

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      The trick to being a good football coach is to make discipline fun, like what Jon Gruden did. He was a yelling hard a$$ whom the players loved playing for and he won a lot of games. Schiano made discipline not fun.

      agreed, that stuff works if you win but not if you lose

    • Anonymous

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      The strict disciplinarian approach is classic team building psychology to weed out the non team orientated players. The majority of that job was already finished and no longer necessary.Most of you guys could learn a lot from boot camp.

      Coach Schiano did clean up the mess that he inherited.  His "disciplinarian" approach was exaggerated, overblown and no different than the majority of NFL coaches of the past who have won championships.  The media, in general,  hated this decent man, mocked him, berated him, all for no good reason.  The Glazers were wrong in not giving Coach Schiano one more year.From the article, "Smith will pay the same price as Schiano if he fails."  No he won't.  Certainly not in 2 years, even with identical records.  Even if Coach Smith's team leads the league in injuries,  has an outbreak of MRSA,  has his starting QB situation go haywire,  he will get a pass and excuses will fill the print and the airwaves.  After 2 years, in the miniscule chance that the Bucs are still losing,  Lovie could then draft a QB of his own choosing and buy himself two more years.However, inheriting a team with  basically zero disciplinary problems,  a roster with great character, key players at key positions just entering their prime, being given full power and authority to create the team of his own liking,  the Bucs should without question make the playoffs this year and win the division no later than next.I have nothing against Lovie and wish him the best.  Comparing the two situations each coach has inherited, though, they couldn't be more different.  Therefore, I can't see how the article can even begin to compare each coach's approach, style.

    • Anonymous

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      The strict disciplinarian approach is classic team building psychology to weed out the non team orientated players. The majority of that job was already finished and no longer necessary.Most of you guys could learn a lot from boot camp.

      Coach Schiano did clean up the mess that he inherited.  His "disciplinarian" approach was exaggerated, overblown and no different than the majority of NFL coaches of the past who have won championships.  The media, in general,  hated this decent man, mocked him, berated him, all for no good reason.  The Glazers were wrong in not giving Coach Schiano one more year.From the article, "Smith will pay the same price as Schiano if he fails."  No he won't.  Certainly not in 2 years, even with identical records.  Even if Coach Smith's team leads the league in injuries,  has an outbreak of MRSA,  has his starting QB situation go haywire,  he will get a pass and excuses will fill the print and the airwaves.  After 2 years, in the miniscule chance that the Bucs are still losing,  Lovie could then draft a QB of his own choosing and buy himself two more years.However, inheriting a team with  basically zero disciplinary problems,  a roster with great character, key players at key positions just entering their prime, being given full power and authority to create the team of his own liking,  the Bucs should without question make the playoffs this year and win the division no later than next.I have nothing against Lovie and wish him the best.  Comparing the two situations each coach has inherited, though, they couldn't be more different.  Therefore, I can't see how the article can even begin to compare each coach's approach, style.

      When you go 11-21 in two years and 5-17 in your last season and a half, you get fired. Losing while having discipline is still losing.

    • Anonymous

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      Coach Schiano did clean up the mess that he inherited.  His "disciplinarian" approach was exaggerated, overblown and no different than the majority of NFL coaches of the past who have won championships.  The media, in general,  hated this decent man, mocked him, berated him, all for no good reason.  The Glazers were wrong in not giving Coach Schiano one more year.

      Well, except for the part where he did a terrible job of actually coaching the team last year.  There's rather more than being a disciplinarian to be an NFL head coach.

    • brycen54

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      Post count: 636

      Most of you completely misunderstand. It is not a permanent state, it is only a phase. Its purpose is to unite the group against a common adversary. Again, it is only the initial phase. Living so close to one of the world's largest cults, you'd think you guys would known more about this stuff.

    • Anonymous

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      Can you imagine the reaction if Schiano had done what Lovie continued to do this off-season as far as cleaning up the cultural problems?

    • Anonymous

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      even Schiano would acknowledge the discipline means little if it does not translate into wins.  He said as much in a pretty classy farewell press conference.

    • Anonymous

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      Can you imagine the reaction if Schiano had done what Lovie continued to do this off-season as far as cleaning up the cultural problems?

      Just win, baby.

    • Anonymous

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      Yep, you need winners to win…

    • Anonymous

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      Coach Schiano did clean up the mess that he inherited.  His "disciplinarian" approach was exaggerated, overblown and no different than the majority of NFL coaches of the past who have won championships.  The media, in general,  hated this decent man, mocked him, berated him, all for no good reason.  The Glazers were wrong in not giving Coach Schiano one more year.

      Well, except for the part where he did a terrible job of actually coaching the team last year.  There's rather more than being a disciplinarian to be an NFL head coach.

      Like I said, no excuses were given Coach Schiano for league leading injuries (massive on the offensive side) ,starting qB exiting with major drama, MRSA.  Instead, he was actually blamed for each.  I wouldn't wish the same treatment on any Coach or human being for that matter,  Coach Smith included.  It was bizarre, but pretty much what should be expected in today's society.

    • Anonymous

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      Again, the mind games were not the problem in and of themselves.  (I have more than a little bit of experience with actual Marine Corps DIs.)  I’m less than convinced that he was actually doing all that great of a job with them, but I understand the basic idea.  But he gave every appearance of failing at the actual coaching part of his job.  The team was woefully unprepared on gamedays.  That’s simply not acceptable for an NFL head coach.

    • Anonymous

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      Coach Schiano did clean up the mess that he inherited.  His "disciplinarian" approach was exaggerated, overblown and no different than the majority of NFL coaches of the past who have won championships.  The media, in general,  hated this decent man, mocked him, berated him, all for no good reason.  The Glazers were wrong in not giving Coach Schiano one more year.

      Well, except for the part where he did a terrible job of actually coaching the team last year.  There's rather more than being a disciplinarian to be an NFL head coach.

      Like I said, no excuses were given Coach Schiano for league leading injuries (massive on the offensive side) ,starting qB exiting with major drama, MRSA.  Instead, he was actually blamed for each.  I wouldn't wish the same treatment on any Coach or human being for that matter,  Coach Smith included.  It was bizarre, but pretty much what should be expected in today's society.

      The bottom line is what was Schiano's upside? We can all come up with excuses for why he didn't win until the cows come home. When deciding his fate you simply have to ask one question, was he ever going to wake up in the morning and be smarter than Bill Belichick, Pete Carroll, Jim Harbaugh, Sean Payton, John Harbaugh, Chip Kelly, Tom Coughlin, Andy Reid, Bruce Arians, Mike McCarthy, Rex Ryan, Jeff Fisher, Mike Tomlin, Mike Smith, and John Fox? I think we know the answer to that.

    • Anonymous

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      Being a disciplinarian didn’t hurt Schiano it was his poor roster decisions along with Dominik and a team unable to adjust game plans for the third and fourth quarter of games (which is why I am watching Glennon’s performance closely in pre season).You can discard talent but you have to replace that talent or try to.  I was not on board with the decision of Lovie and Licht to discard MWill and Revis for peanuts or nothing at all.  But they made the effort to replace said players with similar talent to off set the loss.  Schiano and Dominik cut talented players and replaced them with try hard, low talent players which brought down the overall talent at the top and bottom of the depth chart.  The WR position was actually decent top to bottom but Schiano decided it had to be blown up and it blew up in his face as he couldn't field a worthy WR tandem in his last year. 

    • Anonymous

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      Coach Schiano did clean up the mess that he inherited.  His "disciplinarian" approach was exaggerated, overblown and no different than the majority of NFL coaches of the past who have won championships.  The media, in general,  hated this decent man, mocked him, berated him, all for no good reason.  The Glazers were wrong in not giving Coach Schiano one more year.

      Well, except for the part where he did a terrible job of actually coaching the team last year.  There's rather more than being a disciplinarian to be an NFL head coach.

      Like I said, no excuses were given Coach Schiano for league leading injuries (massive on the offensive side) ,starting qB exiting with major drama, MRSA.  Instead, he was actually blamed for each.  I wouldn't wish the same treatment on any Coach or human being for that matter,  Coach Smith included.  It was bizarre, but pretty much what should be expected in today's society.

      The bottom line is what was Schiano's upside? We can all come up with excuses for why he didn't win until the cows come home. When deciding his fate you simply have to ask one question, was he ever going to wake up in the morning and be smarter than Bill Belichick, Pete Carroll, Jim Harbaugh, Sean Payton, John Harbaugh, Chip Kelly, Tom Coughlin, Andy Reid, Bruce Arians, Mike McCarthy, Rex Ryan, Jeff Fisher, Mike Tomlin, Mike Smith, and John Fox? I think we know the answer to that.

      that is probably the analysis that the Glazers made when considering his fate

    • Anonymous

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      Schiano was blamed for a lot of things that weren’t his fault, for sure. He was a victim of some pretty weird circumstances but that doesn’t mean that even based on purely football reasons he shouldn’t have been fired.

    • brycen54

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      Post count: 636

      Is anyone saying that?

    • Anonymous

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      .  Schiano and Dominik cut talented players and replaced them with try hard, low talent players which brought down the overall talent at the top and bottom of the depth chart.  The WR position was actually decent top to bottom but Schiano decided it had to be blown up and it blew up in his face as he couldn't field a worthy WR tandem in his last year.

      I guess that could be right, but I can think of many more criticisms I would put in front of that

    • Anonymous

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      The bottom line is what was Schiano's upside? We can all come up with excuses for why he didn't win until the cows come home. When deciding his fate you simply have to ask one question, was he ever going to wake up in the morning and be smarter than Bill Belichick, Pete Carroll, Jim Harbaugh, Sean Payton, John Harbaugh, Chip Kelly, Tom Coughlin, Andy Reid, Bruce Arians, Mike McCarthy, Rex Ryan, Jeff Fisher, Mike Tomlin, Mike Smith, and John Fox? I think we know the answer to that.

      Coach Schiano has a very similar personality and coaching style to a younger Belichick, Noll, Lombardi, Coughlin, etc.,  many of those guys having losing seasons early on.  And none of them having to go through what Schiano did. 

    • Anonymous

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      The bottom line is what was Schiano's upside? We can all come up with excuses for why he didn't win until the cows come home. When deciding his fate you simply have to ask one question, was he ever going to wake up in the morning and be smarter than Bill Belichick, Pete Carroll, Jim Harbaugh, Sean Payton, John Harbaugh, Chip Kelly, Tom Coughlin, Andy Reid, Bruce Arians, Mike McCarthy, Rex Ryan, Jeff Fisher, Mike Tomlin, Mike Smith, and John Fox? I think we know the answer to that.

      Coach Schiano has a very similar personality and coaching style to a younger Belichick, Noll, Lombardi, Coughlin, etc.,  many of those guys having losing seasons early on.  And none of them having to go through what Schiano did.

      Chud and Mularky were given one season by their respective teams...if anyone has a right to beyotch and complain, Greg can wait in line.

    • Anonymous

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      Post count: 4623

      The bottom line is what was Schiano's upside? We can all come up with excuses for why he didn't win until the cows come home. When deciding his fate you simply have to ask one question, was he ever going to wake up in the morning and be smarter than Bill Belichick, Pete Carroll, Jim Harbaugh, Sean Payton, John Harbaugh, Chip Kelly, Tom Coughlin, Andy Reid, Bruce Arians, Mike McCarthy, Rex Ryan, Jeff Fisher, Mike Tomlin, Mike Smith, and John Fox? I think we know the answer to that.

      Coach Schiano has a very similar personality and coaching style to a younger Belichick, Noll, Lombardi, Coughlin, etc.,  many of those guys having losing seasons early on.  And none of them having to go through what Schiano did.

      Personality and coaching style aren't the same as intelligence. Belichick is one of the smartest people to ever coach.

    • Anonymous

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      The bottom line is what was Schiano's upside? We can all come up with excuses for why he didn't win until the cows come home. When deciding his fate you simply have to ask one question, was he ever going to wake up in the morning and be smarter than Bill Belichick, Pete Carroll, Jim Harbaugh, Sean Payton, John Harbaugh, Chip Kelly, Tom Coughlin, Andy Reid, Bruce Arians, Mike McCarthy, Rex Ryan, Jeff Fisher, Mike Tomlin, Mike Smith, and John Fox? I think we know the answer to that.

      Coach Schiano has a very similar personality and coaching style to a younger Belichick, Noll, Lombardi, Coughlin, etc.,  many of those guys having losing seasons early on.  And none of them having to go through what Schiano did.

      Chud and Mularky were given one season by their respective teams...if anyone has a right to beyotch and complain, Greg can wait in line.

      Exactly. If you think a coach isn't the right guy, why wait and be "fair"? The NFL is a billion dollar business. Who wants to wait for Schiano to go 6-10 in 2014 and 6-10 or 7-9 in 2015 before you fire him? Just get it over with and move on.

    • Anonymous

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      Is anyone saying that?

      I don't hesitate in saying, ( along with Chris Mortensen, Mike Mayock, and others) that yes, Coach Schiano should have been given a 3rd year.  Odds were against another year of league leading injuries and Josh Freeman being re-united at One Buc.

    • Anonymous

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      Is anyone saying that?

      I don't hesitate in saying, ( along with Chris Mortensen, Mike Mayock, and others) that yes, Coach Schiano should have been given a 3rd year.  Odds were against another year of league leading injuries and Josh Freeman being re-united at One Bu