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    • michael89156

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      As SEC loses serious star power, coaches ask NFL for helpJeremy Fowler    CBS SportsJuly 18, 2014 11:04 pm ETevans_zpsfee424c3.pngMike Evans left Texas A&M early and ended up as a Top 10 pick. (USATSI)HOOVER, Ala. -- The vibe persisted all week at SEC Media Days.This was a week of star coaches, not star players.Nothing against Todd Gurley or Amari Cooper, but the combined 61 SEC underclassmen that declared for the NFL draft in 2013-14 place the league in prove-it mode all over again.Yes, SEC coaches are chest-beating that no league rebuilds quite like theirs. The recruiting is too good, they say. But those same coaches have been publicly clamoring for help from the NFL in the draft evaluation process. They are losing good players, which could affect the bottom line in the fall.Looks like coaches are getting their wish, with an NFL assist that, in theory, could curb depletion.f6b09626-e615-49b3-99dc-93d694798610_zps79630b44.gifSoutheastern Conference coaches are hopeful a revised NFL draft evaluation process will curb the mass departure of underclassmen whose stock takes a hit after leaving early. The numbers suggest the SEC is dealing with a drain of precious roster experience.NFL.com on Thursday confirmed the hints Alabama's Nick Saban dropped to SEC media on the league's new evaluation process with a three-tiered grading system -- first round, second round or neither. Any player in the last tier will be told they "should remain a student-athlete maturing as a potential (NFL) prospect while continuing their education," per NFL.com.Each school is allowed five player evaluations, though that school can apply for additional paperwork. The old system used five tiers, per NFL.com: first, second, third, not in first three rounds or not draftable.SEC commissioner Mike Slive occasionally has dialogue with NFL commissioner Roger Goodell, so perhaps this came up in recent conversation.Ole Miss coach Hugh Freeze hopes the new plan includes precise evaluations, which the five-team limit might facilitate because there's less paperwork involved."It's getting the NFL more involved with telling our kids the truth instead of a form letter that says you could be drafted in top four rounds," Freeze said. "To a kid that means first round. For us to have to tell them that that's not the truth sometimes creates some friction from maybe someone else who's in his ear. I'm a fan of it if it is a smart decision for that kid's family."Nearly 40 percent of underclassmen went undrafted from this year's 98-person class. The last two years, the SEC saw its departures more than double from 2011-12, when it lost a combined 29 players.But the new evaluation setup helps the NFL and college, said former Cleveland Browns GM Phil Savage, now the Senior Bowl executive director.The NFL is trying to help because a player that improves with an extra year of school is a "safer investment," Savage said. More than in past, players enter the pros with a thin resume and often lacking refined technique, Savage said.It's easy to see why the SEC would like the change."Some of the guys that left, they would have been stars this week," said Savage while scanning the Media Day festivities at the Wynfrey Hotel. "You can't replace the experience. Now backups don't have a full year to catch up anymore."Savage adds some players will leave school regardless of grade. It's the trendy thing to do.Freeze would like to see that trend curbed if it helps players, but he isn't buying the notion that the league's talent will dramatically drop off because of the recent numbers.He's seen too many unknown players slash into SEC folklore like ninjas."No one this time last year was talking about Nick Marshall. Nobody," Freeze said. "Two years ago, nobody was talking Johnny Manziel before his first season. There are going to be others who come through. We're recruiting good kids. Does it take a drop off at certain positions? Probably. It will be back in two years."Ole Miss quarterback Bo Wallace was so fired up at the assumption SEC quarterbacks have lost luster that he discussed the matter with Mississippi State's Dak Prescott, Georgia's Hutson Mason and Tennessee's Justin Worley at this summer's Manning Passing Academy.The message: There are still players at the position, so let's prove it.No more Johnny Manziel or Aaron Murray, but Wallace feels help is on the way.Mississippi State's Dan Mullen hopes so. SEC teams are looking for experience any way they can get it. That hasn't been as easy lately."There's no league in the country that reloads like the SEC, but as guys leave early, you have to get to fill back in," Mullen said. "Having experience is a big commodity."

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    • Anonymous

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      Evans is a poor example…  If a player is a 1st or 2nd round material very seldom are they going to stay unless injured or there is a real chance to improve their rating say from a 2nd rounder to early or mid 1st. The big problem is those 37? that declared that didn't even get drafted.

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    • Anonymous

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      The SEC is quickly becoming a parody of itself. This past week’s media days didn’t have the same feel as years past.  ESPN is slowly cooking the golden goose.  Who cares what they are tired of losing they created this problem themselves.

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    • Anonymous

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      It’s not going to be easy to convince a guy to wait a year or two on guaranteed millions if he knows he’s going to be going in the top couple rounds.

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    • Anonymous

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      http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap2000000365780/article/changes-coming-to-feedback-system-for-college-underclassmen?campaign=Twitter_nfl_cb1st round grade, second round grade, go back...

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    • Anonymous

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      The SEC is quickly becoming a parody of itself. This past week's media days didn't have the same feel as years past.  ESPN is slowly cooking the golden goose.  Who cares what they are tired of losing they created this problem themselves.

      What the SEC is really saying is they would rather profit from these players for an additional year instead of the NFL and it's owners doing the same. The NFL needs it's development league in very short order.  The NCAA has become irrelevant, mega conferences have emerged and "student" athletes will soon be unionized.  The winds of change has already blown past.

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    • Anonymous

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      Post count: 2775

      The SEC is quickly becoming a parody of itself. This past week's media days didn't have the same feel as years past.  ESPN is slowly cooking the golden goose.  Who cares what they are tired of losing they created this problem themselves.

      What the SEC is really saying is they would rather profit from these players for an additional year instead of the NFL and it's owners doing the same. The NFL needs it's development league in very short order.  The NCAA has become irrelevant, mega conferences have emerged and "student" athletes will soon be unionized.  The winds of change has already blown past.

      The problem is, the SEC will go away with the evolution and the SEC is largely responsible for CFB evolving in the direction it is.  That's my point about the snake eating it's own tail.  College football will lose a lot soon if it doesn't slow down.  It may already be too late.  It's a shame really. 

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    • Anonymous

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      Post count: 642

      The SEC is quickly becoming a parody of itself. This past week's media days didn't have the same feel as years past.  ESPN is slowly cooking the golden goose.  Who cares what they are tired of losing they created this problem themselves.

      What the SEC is really saying is they would rather profit from these players for an additional year instead of the NFL and it's owners doing the same. The NFL needs it's development league in very short order.  The NCAA has become irrelevant, mega conferences have emerged and "student" athletes will soon be unionized.  The winds of change has already blown past.

      The problem is, the SEC will go away with the evolution and the SEC is largely responsible for CFB evolving in the direction it is.  That's my point about the snake eating it's own tail.  College football will lose a lot soon if it doesn't slow down.  It may already be too late.  It's a shame really.

      So, how would you propose slowing it down?  It's not just the SEC facing this issue either, they just happen to be the most powerful. 

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    • Anonymous

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      Post count: 2775

      The SEC is quickly becoming a parody of itself. This past week's media days didn't have the same feel as years past.  ESPN is slowly cooking the golden goose.  Who cares what they are tired of losing they created this problem themselves.

      What the SEC is really saying is they would rather profit from these players for an additional year instead of the NFL and it's owners doing the same. The NFL needs it's development league in very short order.  The NCAA has become irrelevant, mega conferences have emerged and "student" athletes will soon be unionized.  The winds of change has already blown past.

      The problem is, the SEC will go away with the evolution and the SEC is largely responsible for CFB evolving in the direction it is.  That's my point about the snake eating it's own tail.  College football will lose a lot soon if it doesn't slow down.  It may already be too late.  It's a shame really.

      So, how would you propose slowing it down?  It's not just the SEC facing this issue either, they just happen to be the most powerful.

      The NCAA as a governing body is quite toothless so I am not sure any proposal would be effective until they are out of the picture. 

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    • Anonymous

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      Post count: 52

      Marcus lattimore

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    • Anonymous

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      Marcus lattimore

      There are tons of examples where an injury in college has cost a RB $.  Definitely not exclusive to the SEC.

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    • Anonymous

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      The SEC gets the best players because they’re paying the recruits more than anyone else.  They shouldn’t complain that the NFL can do it better.

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    • Anonymous

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      Post count: 534

      The SEC is quickly becoming a parody of itself. This past week's media days didn't have the same feel as years past.  ESPN is slowly cooking the golden goose.  Who cares what they are tired of losing they created this problem themselves.

      What the SEC is really saying is they would rather profit from these players for an additional year instead of the NFL and it's owners doing the same. The NFL needs it's development league in very short order.  The NCAA has become irrelevant, mega conferences have emerged and "student" athletes will soon be unionized.  The winds of change has already blown past.

      Well said.

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    • Anonymous

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      Post count: 698

      What if the NFL did a Baseball Draft where slot money and the chance to go back to college was allowed if not signed by the start of the School Summer Session Say July 7th? It would force teams to negotiate and force the players to decide if they want to play for the team that drafted them and accept the $$$ or go back to school for another year. D1 schools as Juniors, all others after their Sophomore seasons. If your Top 2 picks don’t sign you receive compensational draft pick during the end of the round the player was drafted.If younger (lower level college players sign) they get posted to a development team roster for 3 years if they don't make the jump to the PS or full roster by then the Team can release them. Add 3 rounds to make it a 10 round draft and lower the slot money 1-3 $$$, 4-6 $$, 7-10$.Seriously, some of these guys that are drafted have no shot at playing they are either deficient in too many areas and it is a waste of their playing time to leave college. They want the $$$ though. So, let them earn a Minor League Minimum so to speak? And Force them to Work on their Games.This may force some of them to work on their games, attitudes and degree's in school.Just Brain Storming~

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    • Anonymous

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      Post count: 107

      The NFL still needs a developmental league in my opinion. No, a ‘minor league’ will not directly slow the underclassmen exodus, but indirectly when these younger college players see underclassmen end up on developmental teams quite likely they’ll stay in school and refine their trade. If nothing else the league would provide a softer landing spot for these players to get better and eventually contribute on a pro team.

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    • Anonymous

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      Post count: 3169

      The system works perfectly fine the way it is.  It’s just rich schools crying poor while cashing $1B checks.  Cry me a river.

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