Twitter has not found a friend in Raheem Morris. To put it frankly, Morris thinks the Twitter craze a weird concept.

“Personally, I don’t know why you’d want to tweet and let everyone in America know what you’re doing,” said Morris when asked about his Twitter policy. “I do not want you to know where I’m at on my personal time.”

Twitter began as a privately funded startup to stay connected with friends. Now, people all across the world can follow breaking news as it happens. From local media to famous athletes and sports organizations to normal, every day folks, it seems like everyone has joined the Twitter craze to engage their followers and get the latest scoop in another facet of communication and Internet social networking.

Former Tampa Bay Buccaneer Warren Sapp, known as QBKilla on Twitter, has one of the largest following of all NFL players with over 32,000 followers. The Bucs organization is closing in on 2,000 followers and Pewter Report is nearly at 1,000 followers.

On August 4, San Diego cornerback Antonio Cromartie, who goes by the handle “crimetime31,” and has over 11,000 followers on Twitter, was fined $2,500 by the Chargers for tweeting about the food at training camp and complaining about it.

As for NFL rules regarding Twitter, which prohibits players from tweeting during games, Morris believes it’s only protecting the guys.

“These guys are 19, 20 years old. I know what I was doing at 20,” said Morris. “If I had a Twitter account and was able to tweet 500 of my girlfriends, it might be nice, but I’m old now. I’m 32.”

Besides some harmless communication with friends and fans, Morris doesn’t see anything positive coming out of tweeting.

“I haven’t heard about anyone tweeting about their charity events and it showing up in the newspaper or anywhere positive. Usually when you tweet something, the only stuff that comes out of it is the negative atmosphere or the negative stuff that you tweet … and by mistake of your cousin, because you say you didn’t do it.”

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