SR’s Fab 5 is a collection of inside scoop, analysis and insight from yours truly, PewterReport.com publisher and Bucs beat writer Scott Reynolds. Here are a few things that caught my attention this week at One Buc Place and around the NFL:

FAB 1. JUREVICIUS’ BIG CATCH ALMOST DIDN’T HAPPEN
There’s no doubt in the world that the best and most significant play in Tampa Bay history is Ronde Barber’s 92-yard interception return for a touchdown at Philadelphia in the 2002 NFC Championship Game. That pick-six helped close the door on the Eagles in a resounding 27-10 victory and send the Buccaneers off to their first and only Super Bowl, which they would win 48-21 over Oakland.

The second-most significant play in Bucs history also happened in that game, and if not for this play first, Barber’s heroic pick-six likely doesn’t happen. Of course I’m talking about Joe Jurevicius’ 71-yard catch-and-run that set up Mike Alstott’s four-yard touchdown run that helped give Tampa Bay a 10-7 lead at halftime.

Bucs QB Brad Johnson - Photo by: Getty Images

Bucs QB Brad Johnson – Photo by: Getty Images

Jurevicius’ big play and Alstott’s scoring run gave the much-needed confidence that the Bucs could score touchdowns on Philadelphia and finally beat the Eagles at Veterans Stadium where the Bucs had lost three straight games since 2000, including twice in the playoffs the two previous seasons.

But Jurevicius’ big-play almost didn’t happen, according to Hall of Fame defensive tackle Warren Sapp, who was a seven-time Pro Bowler in Tampa Bay from 1997-2003 and the 1999 NFL Defensive Player of the Year.

“We were doing the Mike Alstott Ring of Honor last year, and we were sitting there talking – me, Mike, Jurevicius and Brad Johnson,” Sapp recalls. “Brad tells me that he went to the line of scrimmage, looked at the defense and almost checked out of that play. The Joe Jurevicius play – he almost checked out of it!”

Jurevicius’ game-changing reception came late in the second quarter with the Bucs trailing 7-3. A 70-yard kickoff return by Brian Mitchell to the start game set up Philadelphia at the Tampa Bay 26. After a 6-yard catch on first down, running back Duce Staley rips off a 20-yard dash up the middle of the Bucs defense to give Philadelphia an early 7-0 lead. Tampa Bay answered on its next possession with a 48-yard field goal by Martin Gramatica.

With less than four minutes left before halftime, Tampa Bay was backed up at its 4-yard line. Two 6-yard runs by Alstott picked up a first down at the 16-yard line, and an 8-yard pass to wide receiver Keenan McCardell set up a third-and-2 situation at the Tampa Bay 24.

After a timeout, Bucs head coach Jon Gruden, who was in his first season with Tampa Bay, expected a blitz on third down and called for Jurevicius to be the primary receiver running a crossing route while matched up against linebacker Barry Gardner underneath and Blaine Bishop over the top.

“It was a one-on-one option route against the middle linebacker, I believe it was Gardner,” Gruden said in the documentary America’s Game 2002 Buccaneers. “Against certain coverages you have the chance to hit the lottery.”

But Johnson, who had already been picked off once in the first half, nearly audibled to another play despite seeing the look from the defense that Gruden anticipated.

“Brad walked up to the center, saw the defense and said, ‘I’ve got to check out of this,’” Sapp said. “[Center Jeff Christy] said, ‘No, Gruden said to do it.’ So he ran the play. That’s the difference in that football game right there. That’s the difference!”

Bucs DT Warren Sapp & FB Mike Alstott - Photo by: Getty Images

Bucs DT Warren Sapp & FB Mike Alstott – Photo by: Getty Images

Alstott’s 4-yard touchdown plunge off left tackle capped off an improbable 96-yard touchdown drive that stunned Philadelphia.

“Blaine Bishop is still chasing Joe!” Sapp said. “The linebacker switched and Bishop had to come down in the box and pick up Jurevicus, and Joe ran underneath him and beat him for a 71-yard pass play, baby. Then Mike caps it off with a touchdown right behind me – 97 Lead!”

As he had throughout the season in goal line packages, Sapp came in as a blocking tight end on Alstott’s touchdown run.

“I hooked [Eagles defensive end] N.D. Kalu up like a tow truck and took him all the way back to the linebacker!” Sapp said. “There was a big hole on that play. I was the left tight end on that play. Nobody touched Mike Alstott until he was in the end zone. Me and big Roman Oben cleared that whole left side off.”

Had the Eagles gone into halftime with a 7-3 lead, a 7-6 lead or a lead of any kind, the Buccaneers would not have had any momentum heading into the second half. Tampa Bay had failed to score an offensive touchdown at Veterans Stadium in its last three trips, including a 20-10 loss to Philadelphia earlier that season to snap the Bucs’ five-game winning streak. A fumble recovery for a score by linebacker Derrick Brooks was the only touchdown of the day for the Buccaneers on October 20.

“It was an ineffective offense, to say the least today,” Gruden said after that loss. “They are really good on defense, but we have to do a lot better to ever beat the Eagles. We have to make some plays on offense.”

Jurevicius’ 71-yard reception is the kind of play Gruden was talking about. Tampa Bay generated just 207 yards of total offense and surrendered six sacks during the regular season loss at Philadelphia. Johnson, who threw an interception in that game too, took a beating, and left in the fourth quarter with a rib injury.

Yet despite the horrific display by the Bucs offense, Gruden caught on to what Philadelphia defensive coordinator Jim Johnson was doing.

Bucs LB Derrick Brooks & Warren Sapp gave Jon Gruden a Gatorade shower - Photo by: Getty Images

Bucs LB Derrick Brooks & Warren Sapp gave Jon Gruden a Gatorade shower – Photo by: Getty Images

“After we lost 20-10 we got on the bus and Gruden said, ‘I got ‘em,’” Sapp said. “I jumped out of my seat and said, ‘What did you say?!’ The worst three words in football are ‘I got this,’ so I’m going to make you prove it. I looked at Brooks and then at Jon and said, ‘I’m going to bring you back to this damn place. We’re going to make you prove that you’ve got this [expletive] defense!’

“They were not that good defensively. Over the years I was losing my mind that we would lose to the Philadelphia defense and couldn’t score a touchdown. You’ve got to be kidding me! We can’t crack that code? I know Jim Johnson brought some heat, but he didn’t bring that much heat to where it can’t get picked up. But we improved and finally went there with a team that we could get it done with later in the year.”

Jurevicius’ 71-yard catch-and-run nearly encompassed half of what Tampa Bay’s offense generated in a whole game earlier in the 2002 season in Philadelphia. That heroic play stoked the Bucs’ fire and cooled off the Eagles’ defense.

“What we felt good about was the Jurevicius play because after what we had seen the previous three games before that [against Philadelphia], it was real,” Sapp said. “This was real. We could take it to their defense, and after that play, they knew it. Brad let the play develop, he put it on the money and we beat their blitz. That was a shot to Jim Johnson, God bless his soul. When you see your blitz not work against a team you’ve been thumping for years – man, they beat us every time – it was really something! Then Mike gets the touchdown and we’re rolling!”

Bucs FB Mike Alstott & DT Warren Sapp - Photo by: Getty Images

Bucs FB Mike Alstott & DT Warren Sapp – Photo by: Getty Images

Jurevicius nearly didn’t play in the NFC Championship Game because his son, Michael, was born prematurely on January 14 with sialidosis, which is a rare disease in the cell that doesn’t allow the enzymes in the cell to function correctly. Jurevicius flew from a hospital in St. Louis to Philadelphia the night before the game to be with his teammates.

“I think that goes back to the doctors originally giving Michael a 2 percent chance to survive (for) 48 hours,” Jurevicius said at a press conference in 2003 when he finally opened up about his infant son’s death. “Michael beat that by about five days, so he was strong, he persevered, so why couldn’t I? It wasn’t until the last second that I realized I could do something, whether it was block, cheer from the sideline, or catch a pass. I could do something. I’m fortunate, and thankful to my family, thankful to Michael for saying, ‘It’s alright. You need to go.’ It’s surreal that everything that took place for me at a professional level that my ultimate goal, to play in the NFC Championship game, and to have the opportunity to go into Super Bowl and fulfill a childhood dream, along with just becoming a new father, that’s a lot of things bundled up in a short amount of time. It’s not that I’m patting myself on the back, but I just don’t know how I did it.

“That play kind of gets talked about. I guess I had some energy. I had a little bit of steam to burn off. I wasn’t happy my kid was sick. I was just kind of getting into the flow, enjoying the atmosphere, and realizing that we had an opportunity to try and go ahead in that game and win it, and then have an opportunity to win a world championship. Things happen for a reason, and for whatever reason I was able to be a part of that game and do something that people say helped the team out. I’m not a person that gets caught up in that, but I was happy to be out there on the field. I was happy that the Tampa Bay organization won an NFC Championship Game that nobody said we could win. It was too cold, we were playing a great Philadelphia team, and they are, but for whatever reason that day some people were looking down on us and said this was going to be a good day for Tampa Bay. It turned out to be a great day. It was one day out of my life, it wasn’t even 24 hours, and I was back on a plane headed home to be with Meagan and Michael.”

Jurevicius’ son beat the initial odds, but would die 10 weeks later on March 25. Jurevicius only had one reception against the Eagles, but it was the biggest offensive play in franchise history.

Bucs WR Joe Jurevicius - Photo by: Getty Images

Bucs WR Joe Jurevicius – Photo by: Getty Images

“I think he had a little bit of his son’s spirit with him,” Bucs safety John Lynch said. “Right then the atmosphere changed on our sideline.”

Jurevicius’ big play against Philadelphia keyed that victory and allowed Tampa Bay to go on to beat Oakland in Super Bowl XXXVII. Jurevicius would have four catches for 78 yards in the Super Bowl and land on the cover of Sports Illustrated after the game.

“I’ve never seen Jurevicius run like that,” Gruden said after the famous 71-yard reception. “Man, he was flying.”

Not only does that play not happy if Jurevicius doesn’t get on a plane to Philly the night before the NFC Championship Game, it also doesn’t happen if Johnson didn’t change his mind, decide not to audible and trust Gruden’s game plan.

“The difference in that game was – do you trust Gruden?” Sapp said. “Do you trust the coaches and what you’ve been taught all week, or are you going to talk yourself out of it? That’s the key to that game right there. Brad said, ‘I almost checked out of that damn play!’ I said, ‘You’re lyin’!’ He said, ‘No, and I’ve never told anybody that.’ And Joe was sitting right there and he said, ‘Holy smokes!’”

It’s crazy to think that an ill-timed audible could have changed the entire fate of a franchise and the fortune of the Buccaneers. The two best plays in Tampa Bay history almost didn’t happen.

FAB 2. SIMS READY FOR A BIGGER ROLE ON OFFENSE
The whispers from One Buccaneer Place have been there all spring – expect a big year from Charles Sims.

Sims? Don’t the Bucs mean Doug Martin, the Pro Bowl running back with a big, new five-year, $35.75-million contract this offseason that includes $15 million guaranteed?

After all, it was Martin whose 1,402 yards and six touchdowns last year that made him the NFL’s second-leading rusher behind Minnesota’s Adrian Peterson. By comparison, Sims had a third of that yardage with a career-high 529 yards and zero rushing touchdowns as Martin’s backup.

The Bucs believe that Martin had the year he had in 2015 and stayed healthy because of Sims’ career-high 107 carries. Martin didn’t have to carry the entire rushing workload as he did earlier in his career, and as a result, his runs were more productive throughout the season due to receiving ample rest in each game with Sims’ emergence as a runner.

Bucs RB Charles Sims - Photo by: Mark Lomoglio/PR

Bucs RB Charles Sims – Photo by: Mark Lomoglio/PR

“We’ve talked about needing more than one running back,” former Bucs head coach Lovie Smith said last year. “We have a great number one running back in Doug Martin, but we don’t want Doug to carry it and [play all offensive plays]. You need someone to come in. Yes, Charles has [done] what we wanted him to be – relief help. We talked about him catching the ball out of the backfield and third down, different things like that, but he’s been a good first, second down running back. We’re pleased with what he’s done.”

Martin has been a fan favorite in Tampa Bay since his rookie season in 2012 when he rushed for a career-high 1,454 yards and 11 touchdowns and made his first Pro Bowl. He broke several Bucs records that season, including the most rushing yards in a game with 251 yards at Oakland and most rushing touchdowns in a game with four, also against his hometown Raiders.

Sims has been an acquired taste for Buccaneers fans since the team made him a surprise third-round pick in 2014. With Martin on the roster, many fans – and some in the media – felt that drafting another running back with such a high pick was a luxury. PewterReport.com had always been high on Sims in college at both Houston and West Virginia, and had him as a Bucs’ Best Bet at the running back position in our 2014 draft preview.

An ankle tendon issue sidelined Sims during the first eight games of his rookie season, which stunted his growth and didn’t endear him to the fans. Then came a fateful play last year in Tampa Bay’s 31-30 loss at Washington in which the Bucs’ blew a 24-point lead.

After Martin broke off a 49-yard run down to the Redskins’ 5-yard line, his next two carries picked up four more yards, but he was out of gas. On third-and-1, Dirk Koetter, who was Tampa Bay’s offensive coordinator at the time, inserted Sims into the lineup for a toss play that would lose two yards and force the Bucs to settle for a field goal to give Tampa Bay a six-point lead with 2:24 left in regulation.

Sims took heat for the 2-yard loss, but that play was doomed from the start due to the formation and the blocking scheme. The Redskins defense had the Buccaneers outflanked on the play and rookie quarterback Jameis Winston either didn’t see it and didn’t call an audible, or he simply wasn’t allowed to call an audible at the stage of the season due to his lack of NFL experience at the time.

Bucs RB Charles Sims - Photo by: Getty Images

Bucs RB Charles Sims – Photo by: Getty Images

Sims rushed for 49 yards on 10 carries (4.9 avg.) against the Redskins, but also had the first fumble of his career in the fourth quarter. That didn’t help his popularity with the Tampa Bay fan base, either.

Sims did make some strides as running back in 2015 and finished the season with an impressive 4.9-yard average. He had one 20-yard run in 66 carries during his rookie campaign.

Last year, Sims had four runs of 25 yards or more in 107 carries, including a career-long 59-yard jaunt in a 32-18 loss to the New York Giants. Sims had a career-best 78 yards rushing on eight carries (9.8 avg.) against New York, but also had his second fumble of the season.

The Houston, Texas native got stronger as the season went on, with three of his runs of 25 yards or more coming in the final five weeks of the year.

Sims had seven carries for 56 yards (8.0 avg.) in a 23-19 win over Atlanta, seven carries for 50 yards (7.1 avg.) in a 31-23 loss at St. Louis, and four carries for 45 yards (11.3 avg.) in a 26-21 loss to Chicago.

But where Sims really shined last year was as a receiver, catching a career-high 51 passes for 561 yards and four touchdowns. Two of Sims’ receptions went for over 50 yards and showcased his speed – a career-long 56-yarder against Jacksonville and a 50-yard touchdown against Chicago.

Smith deserves a lot of credit for drafting Sims as he coached a similar player that could run and catch the ball well in Chicago in Pro Bowler Matt Forte.

“For that reason, but catching the ball out of the backfield in general, running the football – we just think he’s a good football player,” Smith said last year. “I like the way he’s been running, the way he ran the ball. Especially inside, because you just assume he’s an outside guy for those type plays, but he’s been getting good in-between-the-tackle play, too. I think he’s just a good all-around football player.”

Aside from Winston, Martin and wide receiver Mike Evans, who had a career-high 1,206 yards receiving, no other Buccaneer had more yards from scrimmage than Sims, who produced 1,090 total yards. Not only was Sims the offense’s fourth-most productive player in 2015, his 44 first downs were third-most in Tampa Bay, his 51 catches for 561 yards made him the Bucs’ second-leading receiver behind Evans, and his four touchdown receptions tied tight end Austin Seferian-Jenkins for the team lead.

“He’s done a fantastic job,” Koetter said of Sims. “That’s what football is, it’s role players. It’s everybody playing their role, and had Doug not had the season he had, I think Chuck could’ve done more if given the chance. He wasn’t. He had limited opportunities. You have Vincent [Jackson] and Austin over here, their seasons were disappointing from an injury standpoint – I’m talking they weren’t with us all the time. You have two young guys over here in Cam Brate and Charles Sims who you’re going, ‘Man, those guys have got more to give. They’ve got more for us.’”

The plan is to get Sims more involved in the offense in 2015. He received 158 touches last year (107 carries, 51 receptions), while Martin had a team-high 321 touches (288 carries, 33 receptions). Sims averaged around 10 touches per game, while Martin averaged 20 per game.

Bucs RB Charles Sims - Photo by: Cliff Welch/PR

Bucs RB Charles Sims – Photo by: Cliff Welch/PR

“Everybody wants more touches,” Koetter said last year. “Doug wants more touches. Charles wants more touches. Mike wants more touches. Vincent wants more touches. Every guy out there wants more touches, so no, that’s the coaches’ job. We get a game plan, we’ve got to stick to our game plan. If we’re smart, we’ll keep trying to work it where we give guys touches in the right situations, but there are 64 plays in the average NFL game, there’s only so many. I tell the coaches all the time, ‘Start dividing them up, okay? How do you want to divide them up’. The easiest thing is to turn around and hand it off to a running back. We have plays tagged for Charles every week, we have since Week 1. We continue to have plays tagged for him. We have plays tagged for everybody. Just because we have a play tagged for someone still doesn’t mean they’re going to get the ball, because there are checks involved, there’s different coverages involved, different defenses.”

With Koetter calling plays for the second straight year in Tampa Bay the guess here is that those numbers will change in 2016. Martin might be more in line to average 18 touches per game, while Sims might be bumped up to 12 and here is why.

Tampa Bay plans to play a lot of regular personnel (two wide receivers, two backs and one tight end) and double tight personnel (two wide receivers, two tight ends and one back), which will force teams to play a lot of base personnel. Sims proved he could excel as a receiver when matched up against linebackers, and Koetter plans to identify more of those mismatches this season and use Sims in the passing game to exploit them.

Sims will also get more looks as a check down receiver on third downs, and there are also plans to line up Sims in the slot and out wide for special plays, such as his 32-yard touchdown, which came on a wide receiver screen at Houston last year.

Sims showed improvement as both a runner and a receiver last year and got better as the season went on. He showed some amazing body control and great hands with circus catches like the ones that scored touchdowns against Chicago and Philadelphia.

“The throw to Chuck – Charles Sims – [was] borderline dangerous, but [Winston] gave him a chance,” Koetter said of Sims’ amazing touchdown catch at Philadelphia in a 45-17 victory last year. “We’d never seen the corner leak off like that. We thought the safety would go over the top. They switched it off with the corner and the safety. Chuck made a fantastic play.”

Bucs running backs coach Tim Spencer has personally overseen Sims’ development and believes he’s ready for a breakout year, and that will cause fans to have a better appreciation for Sims’ talents and contributions.

Bucs RB Charles Sims - Photo by: Getty Images

Bucs RB Charles Sims – Photo by: Getty Images

“Well, Chuck was still a young player [last year],” said Spencer. “He didn’t really get to play because he was hurt [as a rookie], but I saw him grow each and every game. He’s still learning the game. We tried to move him outside an awful lot and play some receiver things. He can catch the ball, but in terms of receiver-wise, he didn’t quite have all of those adjustments together, but I think that’s what you saw later in the year. Hopefully – we’ve been working on that a lot this year so I think you should see some improvement this year from him.”

And more touches for Sims, who is an under the radar type of talent.

“He’s under the radar to everybody else, but not to us,” Bucs wide receiver Louis Murphy said. “He’s a great talent and he’s going to be a great running back. He listens and learns. He’s a young guy that had an ankle injury his rookie year when he came in. That was tough on him, but he showed what he could do last year. He’s very explosive and he’s one of the most explosive players we have on the team.”

FAB 3. THE BUCCANEERS’ ALL- TIME COACHING STAFF
With the Buccaneers on vacation until late July and the news coming out of One Buccaneer Place quite slow, I thought it would be fun and thought provoking to do an opinion piece on Tampa Bay’s all-time coaching staff. Of course this list starts at the top with the head coach, and the inevitable challenging question?

Who is the best head coach in Bucs history – Jon Gruden or Tony Dungy?

So I decided to use my lifeline and text Hall of Fame defensive tackle Warren Sapp for help. Sapp then called me and gave his response.

“Good luck!” Sapp laughed.

Bucs DT Warren Sapp & Jon Gruden - Photo by: Getty Images

Bucs DT Warren Sapp & Jon Gruden – Photo by: Getty Images

My initial reaction has always been to go with Gruden, who with a 57-55 record is the Bucs’ all-time winningest coach and the only coach to deliver Tampa Bay a Super Bowl championship. Those accomplishments seal the deal.

Yet Dungy deserves credit for turning the Bucs around and for only having one losing season as a head coach, which was his first in 1996 when Tampa Bay went 6-10. He also has the best winning percentage (.556) in team history with a 54-42 record with the Bucs.

What holds Dungy back was that his teams were defensive-laden, but he never figured out how to build Tampa Bay’s offense consistently, evidenced by going through three different offensive coordinators in his last three years.

“Gruden held us accountable – on both sides of the ball,” Sapp said. “Plus, I’ve never seen a coach command a room like Gruden.”

So Gruden it is. He leads off my list of All-Time Bucs Coaches.

Bucs Head Coach Jon Gruden (2002-08)
Not only did Gruden produce the most wins in team history and an offense capable of beating Philadelphia in the playoffs and winning the Super Bowl (27 of Tampa Bay’s 48 points in Super Bowl XXXVII were scored on offense), he also guided the Bucs to two division titles in 2002 and 2005 and three trips to the playoffs (2002, 2005, 2007). Even Tampa Bay’s defense soared to new heights under Gruden, attaining a No. 1 ranking in 2002 and 2005 for the first time since the fabled 1979 defense. Gruden, who had a cult-like following in Tampa Bay, issued a now-famous challenge to the defense to score nine defensive touchdowns upon his arrival in 2002 – a feat that was accomplished with three defensive TDs in the Super Bowl.

Bucs head coach Dirk Koetter - Photo by: Getty Images

Bucs head coach Dirk Koetter – Photo by: Getty Images

Offensive Coordinator Dirk Koetter (2015-present)
Koetter is only one of two current members of the Buccaneers coaching staff to make this list. Why? Because in just one year, Koetter developed an offense that featured a Pro Bowl rookie quarterback in Jameis Winston, who threw for over 4,000 yards, a 1,200-yard receiver in Mike Evans, and a Pro Bowl running back in Doug Martin that rushed for over 1,400 yards and was the second-leading rusher in the NFL. Tampa Bay’s offense also featured a slew of first- and second-year players, and despite that youth, the Bucs eclipsed the 6,000-yard mark for the first time in franchise history and finished with a top 5 ranking in total offense.

Defensive Coordinator Monte Kiffin (1996-08)
Not only is Kiffin the greatest defensive coordinator in Bucs history, no other coach has won more games in Tampa Bay with 111 victories over his illustrious 13-year career that spanned the coaching tenures of both Dungy and Gruden. Kiffin took Dungy’s Cover 2 defense and perfected it, making the Tampa 2 defense a league-wide trend in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Kiffin was partly responsible for hiring legendary assistant coaches Mike Tomlin and Joe Barry in 2001, and his No. 1 ranked defense helped Tampa Bay win its first and only Super Bowl in 2002. Kiffin’s defense produced several Pro Bowlers, in addition to two Hall of Famers in Sapp and linebacker Derrick Brooks. In addition to Dungy and Gruden, Kiffin’s name eventually belongs in the Bucs Ring of Honor, too (Glazers, are you reading this?).

Special Teams Coordinator Rich Bisaccia (2002-10)
Bisaccia coached special teams in Tampa Bay for nine years, which is the longest tenure of any of special teams coordinator and helped Tampa Bay win Super Bowl XXXVII. Tampa Bay’s special teams were usually quite good under his leadership, and Bisaccia was responsible for ending the Bucs’ kickoff return for a touchdown curse when Micheal Spurlock did the honors in 2007. Bisaccia also developed a Pro Bowl return specialist in Clifton Smith in 2008.

Bucs QBs coach Mike Bajakian - Photo by: Mark Lomoglio/PR

Bucs QBs coach Mike Bajakian – Photo by: Mark Lomoglio/PR

Quarterbacks Coach Mike Bajakian (2015-present)
The history of quarterback coaches in Tampa Bay has not been an overly successful one. Perhaps Bajakian can change that trend. He’s certainly off to a great start, turning first-round pick Jameis Winston into a 4,000-yard passer and a Pro Bowler as a rookie. Winston joined Trent Dilfer, Brad Johnson and Jeff Garcia as just the fourth quarterback in Bucs history to make the Pro Bowl, and no Tampa Bay QB has made it more than once. Expect that to change with Winston and Bajakian teaming together for years to come.

Running Backs Coach Tony Nathan (1996-2001)
Under Nathan, Tampa Bay had the league’s 11th-ranked and fourth-ranked rushing attack in 1997 and ’98 behind the legs of running back Warrick Dunn and fullback Mike Alstott, which became known as WD-40. Nathan helped Alstott set a Bucs rookie record with 65 catches in 1996, and developed Dunn into a Pro Bowl rusher as a rookie in 1997 and again in 2000. Five of Alstott’s six Pro Bowls occurred on Nathan’s watch, and Dunn eclipsed the 1,000-yard mark twice (1998 and 2000). Alstott is Tampa Bay’s all-time touchdown producer with 71 and the team’s second-leading rusher with 5,088 yards, while Dunn ranks third in team annals with 4,986 yards.

Wide Receivers Coach Richard Mann (2002-08)
Under Mann’s watch, the Buccaneers had a 1,000-yard receiver in every year of the Gruden regime in Keyshawn Johnson (2002), Keenan McCardell (2003), Michael Clayton (2004), Joey Galloway (2005-07) and Antonio Bryant (2008), as well as a big-time contribution from wide receiver Joe Jurevicius during Tampa Bay’s Super Bowl season in 2002. That’s a standard of production that no other wide receivers coach in Bucs history can match. During his seven years with the Bucs, Tampa Bay had five different leading receivers, which is an indication that he had a difficult task of always bringing newcomers up to speed with Gruden’s offense due to the lack of continuity.

Art Valero, Bill Muir and Jon Gruden - Photo by: Cliff Welch/PR

Art Valero, Bill Muir and Jon Gruden – Photo by: Cliff Welch/PR

Tight Ends Coach Art Valero (2002-07)
Valero served as Gruden’s tight ends coach in 2002-03 and helped assimilate veterans Ken Dilger and Rickey Dudley into Gruden’s offense for a Super Bowl run in 2002. During the 2003 season, four different tight ends caught touchdown passes in Dilger, Dudley, Todd Yoder and Will Heller. Valero switched to running backs from 2004-07 where he groomed Cadillac Williams for NFL Rookie of the Year honors in 2005, and he served as Gruden’s assistant head coach during his last two years in Tampa Bay.

Offensive Line Coach Bill Muir (2002-08)
If Tampa Bay’s offensive line continues to progress as it did in 2015, current position George Warhop may eventually dethrone Muir. But for now, the work Muir did in Tampa Bay stands alone. During the Bucs’ Super Bowl season alone, Muir moved Kenyatta Walker from left tackle to right tackle, and integrated newcomers Roman Oben (left tackle) and Kerry Jenkins (left guard) into the starting lineup. The Bucs offensive line was constantly shuffled throughout Muir’s time in Tampa Bay, but he always managed to make due with what he had and helped develop guard right guard Davin Joseph and left tackle Donald Penn into Pro Bowl-caliber players.

Rod Marinelli and Monte Kiffin - Photo by: Cliff Welch/PR

Rod Marinelli and Monte Kiffin – Photo by: Cliff Welch/PR

Defensive Line Coach Rod Marinelli (1996-2005)
Marinelli is not just the best defensive line coach in Bucs history. He may very well be the premier defensive line coach in NFL history, too. In Tampa Bay, Marinelli helped develop Sapp into a Pro Bowler and the 1999 NFL Defensive Player of the Year, and took Pro Bowl defensive end Simeon Rice’s game to a whole new level. Marinelli helped develop four double-digit sackers in Tampa Bay, including Sapp, Rice, Chidi Ahanotu and Marcus Jones. Marinelli was so well thought of by Gruden that he was named his assistant head coach from 2002-05.

Linebackers Coach Joe Barry (2001-06, ‘09)
Barry is the only position coach in Tampa Bay history to serve under three different head coaches – Dungy, Gruden and Raheem Morris. He not only helped Derrick Brooks to six Pro Bowls during his time in Tampa Bay, Barry also helped him become the NFL Defensive Player of the Year in 2002. Barry also helped Shelton Quarles transition from strongside linebacker to middle linebacker and into a Pro Bowl performer in 2002, and develop Barrett Ruud into Tampa Bay’s leading tackler.

Defensive Backs Coach Mike Tomlin (2001-05)
The Bucs have had some talented defensive backs coaches, including the likes of Herman Edwards, Raheem Morris and Jimmy Lake, but Tomlin stands alone. Strong safety John Lynch was a two-time Pro Bowler under his watch, while cornerback Ronde Barber made the Pro Bowl three times. He also had a career-high 10 interceptions in 2001, which was Tomlin’s first year in Tampa. Tomlin also developed Brian Kelly into the team’s leading interceptor (with eight) during Tampa Bay’s Super Bowl run in 2002. In Super Bowl XXXVII, Tomlin’s free safety Dexter Jackson recorded two interceptions to become the MVP, while cornerback Dwight Smith set a Super Bowl record with two pick-sixes.

What do you think of this list? Did I nail it? Do you agree or disagree? Sound off in the comments section below.

FAB 4. FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH RESIDES IN TAMPA BAY
With an average age of 25.91 last year, the Buccaneers were the league’s 11th-youngest team. St. Louis was the youngest team with an average age of 24.94. The oldest team last year was Indianapolis, which had an average age of 27.17. Credit goes to Jimmy Kempski of the Philly Voice for compiling the data.

Bucs WR Vincent Jackson - Photo by: Getty Images

Bucs WR Vincent Jackson – Photo by: Getty Images

The offseason retirement of Pro Bowl guard Logan Mankins, who was 33 last year, should help the Bucs move up in the rankings towards becoming a younger team in 2016. As of today, Tampa Bay has only seven players age 30 or older on its 90-man roster. Backup center Evan Smith with join the club on July 19 and give Tampa Bay eight players age 30 or older.

Linebacker Daryl Smith, a newcomer this offseason, is the oldest Buccaneer at age 34. Wide receiver Vincent Jackson is 33, while cornerback Brent Grimes, another free agent addition this offseason, is 32. Reserve offensive tackle Gosder Cherilus is also 32.

There are three 30-year olds on Tampa Bay’s roster, including free agent signee defensive end Robert Ayers, backup tight end Brandon Myers and right tackle Demar Dotson.

Tampa Bay could get significantly younger if some of these aging veterans don’t make the 53-man roster this year. Daryl Smith, Jackson, Grimes, Ayers and Dotson are slated to start, but Cherilus, Myers and Evan Smith aren’t locks to make the team. If they depart, the Bucs will be left with just five players age 30 or older.

With the contracts of the two oldest Buccaneers – Daryl Smith and Jackson – expiring after the end of this year, Tampa Bay could be an even younger team in 2017 if neither player returns next season. The contract for Dotson is also up, although there has been some talk of a contract extension in late August and early September if Dotson stays healthy during the preseason and hangs on to his starting right tackle job.

The Bucs selected Vernon Hargreaves on Thursday night – Photo by: Cliff Welch/PR

Bucs CB Vernon Hargreaves III

On the other side of the equation, the Bucs have three players who are 21 years old in middle linebacker Kwon Alexander, rookie offensive lineman Caleb Benenoch and cornerback Vernon Hargreaves III, who is the youngest on the team after turning 21 on June 3. Hargreaves was drafted at the age of 20.

The youngest player to join an NFL team on the current Bucs roster remains wide receiver Mike Evans, who was just 20 years old when he was drafted. Evans left Texas A&M as a redshirt sophomore in 2014 and turns 23 on August 21 as he enters his third NFL season.

Imagine how good this young Buccaneers team will be a in a few years as some of this talent matures?

FAB 5. SR’s BUCS SHOTS
• Tampa Bay running back Charles Sims is a taller running back at 6-foot, 210 pounds and has an upright running style similar to that of former Bucs rusher Michael Pittman. Of course the league has had two premier running backs that had an upright running style in Eric Dickerson and Adrian Peterson. Bucs head coach Dirk Koetter isn’t about to change Sims’ style.

“He is an upright runner,” Koetter said. “There’s been plenty of upright runners be successful in this league. It’s my experience that you are going to have a hard time changing that, just like you are going to have a hard time changing the way a quarterback throws the ball. A guy runs how he runs, been doing since they were little kids. That style has been successful. Tim Spencer, that would be a good question for him. I personally do not waste any words talking to Charles about that myself.

“When I was with the Falcons, we coached Charles in the Senior Bowl and we thought really highly of him too. He’s an all-purpose guy. He’s got speed, he’s got hands, he can run routes, and you can move him around. We’ve seen his explosiveness, what he can do with the ball in the open field.”

Bucs QB Jameis Winston - Photo by: Cliff Welch/PR

Bucs QB Jameis Winston – Photo by: Cliff Welch/PR

• Don’t expect Jameis Winston to have a sophomore slump in 2016. The second-year Tampa Bay quarterback has been working too hard this offseason to have a drop off in his performance.

“His work ethic and his mentality are special,” Bucs wide receiver Adam Humphries said. “You guys aren’t in the practice facility every day, but he’s the first one in and the last one to leave. He doesn’t get tired of doing the little things right. You can tell by the way he’s changed his body, I’m pretty sure he’s lost weight. He’s lean. He’s hungry and he wants to improve off last year. Even after the great season he had he wants to continue to get better. He wants to be a big name in the NFL.”

• Although Tampa Bay hasn’t turned the corner and produced a winning season over the five years, some Buccaneers players have enjoyed a great deal of personal success with team records, personal milestones and Pro Bowl appearances. Legendary Bucs defensive tackle Warren Sapp has a cautionary tale about how the success Tampa Bay achieved going 10-6 in 1997 and winning a playoff game went to the team’s head as the Bucs suddenly became overconfident.

“After our double-digit winning season in 1997, the 1998 season happened,” Sapp said. “Everybody picked us to do something and we went 8-8. That’s when we learned the worst three words in the NFL: ‘We got this.’ Those are the worst three words in football – we got this. What we learned is that we don’t got it. We never got it. Our attitude became that we don’t got it until we’re holding a trophy in our hands and a parade in Tampa.”

• ProFootballFocus.com rated Bucs running back Doug Martin’s contract as the second-best contract for a running back in the league. Well done, Jason Licht and Mike Greenberg.

• Thank you for the outstanding comments on SR’s Fab 5 over the past couple of weeks. I read them all and I have enjoyed your feedback and your civil debate. As you’ve seen, I’ve used some of those comments for my new SR’s Fab 5 Reaction columns, which come out every Tuesday on PewterReport.com. The SR’s Fab 5 Reaction furthers the discussion about the topics found in the most recent SR’s Fab 5 column, and allows me to answer questions you pose or dive deeper into my reasoning on those topics. Here is a link to last week’s SR’s Fab 5 Reaction in case you missed it.

• Be sure to follow @PewterReport on Twitter if you’re not already by clicking here.

• I want everyone to have a safe and happy Independence Day, otherwise known as the Fourth of July. If you’re going to be celebrating by cooking outdoors, stop by Just Grillin and get all of your BBQ needs from Weber grills and Big Green Eggs to grilling accessories, charcoal and wood chips to sauces, rubs and seasonings.

Just Grillin is located at 11743 N. Dale Mabry Highway in Carrollwood, which is just 15 minutes north of Raymond James Stadium. Visit them on the web at JustGrillinFlorida.com or stop by their amazing showroom, which is like BBQ heaven – and tell them PewterReport.com sent you.

• I’m going to be on vacation for parts of the next two weeks, but I have fresh Bucs content to share. The next two SR’s Fab 5 columns will be a mix of new and old content as I’ll be going into the archive for some “Best of SR’s Fab 5” material. I will lead with some fresh editorial that I think you will find very interesting in the first half of SR’s Fab 5, followed by some of our most popular segments of past columns. Then I will finish each forthcoming SR’s Fab 5 with some new information, analysis and observations in the final SR’s Bucs Shots segments for your viewing pleasure.

There will be new SR’s Fab 5 Reactions all through the month of July, as well as new Bucs content as we count down the days until the start of training camp. Thank you for visiting PewterReport.com!

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About the Author: Scott Reynolds

Scott Reynolds is in his 25th year of covering the Tampa Bay Buccaneers as the vice president, publisher and senior Bucs beat writer for PewterReport.com. Author of the popular SR's Fab 5 column on Fridays, Reynolds oversees web development and forges marketing partnerships for PewterReport.com in addition to his editorial duties. A graduate of Kansas State University in 1995, Reynolds spent six years giving back to the community as the defensive line coach for his sons' Pop Warner team, the South Pasco Predators. Reynolds can be reached at: sr@pewterreport.com
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e
e
5 years ago

Fab Five, as usual, Scott! In defense of Dungy, I would say that you have to go back to 1995, when this team was an epic failure for two decades. It was that patience displayed by Dungy and the loyalty of the core players to him that started this whole run. I just don’t see Gruden as the guy that would have built this team up from the depths. I honestly don’t think that we would have won the Superbowl, if Gruden wasn’t hired at that point. He put enough offense to a great Dungy defense and put us over… Read more »

Runole
Runole
Reply to  e
5 years ago

Dungy laid the foundation and certainly had some great draft picks, but his offensive philosophy was horrible.

Gruden kept the defensive staff intact and finally brought a real NFL offense to Tampa.

I agree the steady and patient hand of Dungy should never be diminished but the “Fire” of Gruden took the BUC’s over the top.

WinstonMVP
WinstonMVP
5 years ago

Man, I got goose bumps reading SR piece on JJ and watching the J Jurevicius video. :)

Horse
Horse
5 years ago

Very good Fab 5 Scott. Go Bucs!

jongruden
jongruden
5 years ago

I would agree on Gruden as best all time coach only because he was able to take us to the mountain top, Dungy did turn us around from a nobody to a somebody and I will always have a respect for him for that BUT he had no idea how to fix the offense where as Gruden came in and transformed the offense into a productive and successful one. While people will say” Gruden won with Dungy’s Team” I will also say didn’t Gruden take the Raiders from nobody and turn them into SB contenders and transforming journeyman players such… Read more »

macabee
macabee
Reply to  jongruden
5 years ago

This is quite a read, so I don’t post this for general consumption. But for our Jon Gruden to read in his spare time when he isn’t Facebooking with Luke Stocker.

Just another perspective Jon and one that is the consensus opinion on your namesake. Remember reading is fundamental! lol.

http://tampabaysportsblog.blogspot.com/2009/01/anatomy-of-jon-grudens-dismissal.html

jongruden
jongruden
Reply to  macabee
5 years ago

Macabee – You crack me up for some reason I give you the impression I don’t know the history of this team or something I have been a fan since 1985 and read many articles and I have streamed many shows in the Tampa Area to get all the inside info on my team, thx for the copy and pasted article of what happened with Gruden but I already know the reasons there of. He also lied to McCardell about being resigned etc. My point is these are minor details to fire a coach who in his last season went… Read more »

76Buc
76Buc
Reply to  jongruden
5 years ago

I think jongruden really is Jon Gruden!

knight
knight
5 years ago

Nice Fab 5 for a quiet week. I can still remember the Philly game like it was yesterday. Great story on the play Jurevicius play, it’s always the little things/seconds that define us. A little challenge on the best HC in BUCS history. No question Gruden won the super bowl (I loved that guy), and no question Dungy turn the “YUKS” to the BUCS, BUT what about TB’s 1st head coach John Mckay. He took an expansion team that went winless to the doorsteps of the super bowl. He also had some of the best quotes from a coach ever.… Read more »

76Buc
76Buc
Reply to  knight
5 years ago

I agree completely! I only wish he would have executed our offense, for it was truly offensive.

cgmaster27
cgmaster27
5 years ago

Another good Fab during the slow season. I’ve always been a JJ fan and I will always remember his double tap catch , when he tipped the ball to himself in the end zone that post season. Can’t remember what game it was but the catch was awesome. Dealing with what he had to deal with , with his son and still playing is some tough stuff right there. The fact that Brad Johnson almost changed that play is a great little tidbit to hear. I like how Christy was like hell no dude, you don’t second guess Mr. G.… Read more »

nybuccguy
nybuccguy
5 years ago

A much better article than last weeks.I never understood the lack of proof reading though. For example, Fab 2 with the best bucs coaches states that Koetter is the only active coach on the list. Then you list Bajakian as the best QB coach a mere two paragraphs later. Its not the end of the world, just some constructive criticism.

johnnybuc1
johnnybuc1
5 years ago

Yeah…but Scott, WHAT ABOUT BREXIT???? lol
j/k
Another great Fab 5 giving us great insight into Charles Sims III and what went down in the NFCCG back in 2003.
Keep it up!

fredster
fredster
5 years ago

Good fab 5. The Eagles had out number for a while back then. I remember the J.J. Catch well. The game wasn’t going well and that run up the middle in the beginning….I was like here we go again. That catch was the. Hanging point. Good times. We have a lot of weapons on offense if they all stay healthy and mature a bit. Penalties were just maddening last year. They should bring officials into practice this year.

drdneast
drdneast
5 years ago

Great Fab5 and terrific new intel on The Play to Jurevicius. Since Sims doesn’t seem to have a fumbling problem, only the ficklest fans would dog him for dropping the rock a couple of times during the season. Besides the QB, the RB’s touch the ball more often than anyone else so of course the number of fumbles they have will be greater. The degree and severity of hits they take also add to the numbers. Can’t argue with the coaching selections and always thought Rich Bisaccia should have gotten the head coaching gig instead of Morris. Still, with the… Read more »

jongruden
jongruden
Reply to  drdneast
5 years ago

Stocker had a measely 60 yds for the yr as our TE blocking or not that is pure trash, man if this guy gets 100 yds for the season will you be buying his uniform? Becht was a bust from the Jets and was waived and he also sucked for us as well we also had Ricky Dudley who Gruden wanted and he sucked too, point is fans in those days didn’t over hype those guys like they do now, mediocre players are now appluaded in Tampa and this needs to stop, raise the standard for this team please

BucWild02
BucWild02
5 years ago

I suppose it was as good a week as any to go back to the well and talk about something all Bucs fans love to read about..the ’02 season and the best plays of all time. Thankfully we didnt get another sermon on God or a misaligned comment about soveriegnty for Britain – a country which so many other nations have declared their sovereignty FROM. I will add that a united Europe is stronger financially and from the threat of terrorism, just as the United States is stronger from 50 states working together vs 50 seperate countries feuding over everything.… Read more »

Horse
Horse
5 years ago

The best celebration of fireworks I ever had in my life was in Viet Nam 1970 on the DMZ where we used just every flare, claymore, phu gas, rifle, machine gun, duster, tank; also called in artillery and everything the air force/navy/marines had available as to napalm. It also helped with the moon almost full too so there was no worries about being over run. Yep it was a great night.

chefboho
chefboho
Reply to  Horse
5 years ago

Well I have nothing but respect for your services to our country horse. I have family of all generations in different branches of the military and I commend every man and woman who make sacrifices so I can rest a little easier at night.

76Buc
76Buc
Reply to  Horse
5 years ago

That’s funny Horse. We did the same thing on the Korean DMZ in 1969. Even shot M-79’s straight in the air. Not very smart.

drdneast
drdneast
5 years ago

jongruden, that explanation still doesn’t jibe or explain your alleged Christianity and your continuous attacks against Stocker. You have posted many diatribe’s against Stoker and other players you consider, “mediocre” who didn’t warrant or deserve your wrath. “Judgment is mine sayeth the Lord.” I’m sure there are hundreds of other verses that encourage you to be kind to your neighbor, but I admit my bible learnings are a bit lean. Whatever the case, I don’t remember any that encourage you to pick on others with irrational wrath. I will say like so many of the self possessed Christian’s I have… Read more »

drdneast
drdneast
5 years ago

Horse, nothing like well lit targets shoot at and see the flesh flying from the broken torn limbs and blood geysering from open wounds. Have talked to a fee veterans in my time, including my dad, and none spoke to me with as much glee about killing the enemy like you did. Most of them talked about the honor they felt in serving alongside and helping brother soldiers or were proud of the sacrifices they made for their country. But none of them talked about the glory of combat or killing. Most wanted to forget if they had taken a… Read more »

Horse
Horse
Reply to  drdneast
5 years ago

drdneast, I have no clue what you are talking about. We were celebrating the Fourth of July! We weren’t blowing anybody up, we were having fun watching our made up fireworks. Geez give it a break. Our Combat Base had at least a click of clear ground around its perimeter. The nearest village was a couple clicks away across the Cua Viet/Quang Tri River and nobody was getting hurt as we were firing west not east. Geez I’m sorry I even brought it up as it was one of my better nights in Viet Nam.

chetthevette
chetthevette
5 years ago

Great Fab5.
I can remember being quite on edge during the start of that game. Wondering how they can get over the hump and beat the Beagles. I’ll tell you this, I spilled my popcorn all over this place when JJ took off. One of my favorite Bucs plays ever.
I think you nailed the coaching staff. But, I have always had a soft spot good ol’ McCay. All he did was take the dregs of the NFL and got to the NFC Championship game.
And his pressers were priceless. The guy was just funny as hell.
GO BUCS

Xpfcwintergreen
Xpfcwintergreen
5 years ago

Interesting recollections from some of our Vietnam Vets for this Independence Day celebration weekend. I remember shooting a few flares and firing some rounds on the one 4th I spent there. _ The most “fireworks” I remember happened one night during the “mini Tet” of 1969. The VC rained over two hundred rockets on us according to “official” reports. This was at Chu Lai, Quảng Nam Province. _ For those who don’t know, Tet is the New Year celebrated by the Vietnamese in February. _ Also some Americans may not realize that for Many of the Vietnamese people the war… Read more »

Xpfcwintergreen
Xpfcwintergreen
5 years ago

I also wanted to follow up on something that was mentioned in Bucs Shots.
_
The comparison of Sims to Eric Dickerson is really interesting to me. Dickerson is one of my all time favorite NFL running backs. I just loved to watch him play. For a big man he glided like a deer when running. He was a joy to watch as a fan, though, I did not follow any of the teams he played for.
_
I will watch Sims more closely this year. We have a great tandem with him and Martin.
_
Go Bucs!!!

drdneast
drdneast
5 years ago

I’m glad to hear that Horse. I hope you accept my apologies for the misinterpretation of your post. Also, thank you so much for your service to this county.

drdneast
drdneast
5 years ago

Xpfcwintergreen. and thank you for your service as well although the Tet Offensive as we know it now as happened in 1968.
One of my main recollection of the war was when the first night they did the ping pong ball lottery and all the anguished cries I heard in the student union at USF.
It was 1973 I believe and no one wanted to be the last person to die in that godforsaken war.

revfish
revfish
5 years ago

As good as Dirk seemed to be last year as off. coordinator, I think a strong case might be made for Joe Gibbs as the best we had all-time. Before all the injuries hit in ’78, he did some great things with our team that carried on with Washington. Wondering if you had thought about him.

scubog
scubog
5 years ago

Wife and I spent some time in Steelers and Browns country this past weekend, but all the buzz in those parts is the Cavs and Pens. Framed Joe Jurevicius’ jersey is hanging on the wall of my Bucs room. He was an inspiration to the team in its’ quest to knock off the over-confident Eagles. As for our best HC. Each benefited from their predecessor except John McKay. In those days an expansion team had no chance. The 26 straight losses in 1976 and 1977 were what defined the team for years to come. The 1978 team began 4-4 before… Read more »

chetthevette
chetthevette
Reply to  scubog
5 years ago

Hey scubog. Perkins and Bennet. They were equally crappy. Those were some dark years there.

scubog
scubog
Reply to  chetthevette
5 years ago

Don’t forget Richard Williamson