The East-West Shrine Bowl is back again at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg for 2020. College players have come from all parts of the country to play in front of scouts, coaches, agents, and many others to show their skills with the hope of getting picked by a team in this year’s NFL draft.

PewterReport.com will be at each East-West Shrine practice during the week and covering the standout players from each day. Here are the standouts on offense from day one of practice.

East Team

WR Keith Gavin – Florida State
Gavin burst right onto the scene early in practice showing off his deep ball receiving ability. If there was a highlight reel play during practice, it was Gavin who was making it. On the first deep ball, Gavin made a move on the defender and left him in the dust for an easy reception that he was rewarded on for getting that open. His second deep ball was an impressive catch with both a corner and a safety on him and in stride with the former Florida State wideout.

The deep ball is what made Gavin standout on day one, but it wasn’t the only thing he could do. Gavin made a nice sideline catch keeping both feet in bounds with good body control. Gavin is a physical receiver that can also get down field, and he even said that he enjoys blocking in the run game as much as he enjoys making catches. Of all the players in  practice on day one for the East, Gavin had the best performance.

WR Isaiah Wright – Temple
Sometimes route running can get overlooked when you’re evaluating a receiver. Everyone normally first looks at how well they can catch and how fast they can run, but when you see a double move like Wright put on in Monday’s practice, it stands out. Wright’s opponent bought his move hook, line, and sinker, as he got wide open for the touchdown.

The Temple wide receiver had a ton of speed during the individual segments of practice and in the 11-on-11 portion. Wright made it difficult all afternoon for the corners that were trying to cover him, and his pass catching ability was strong as well.

West Team

RB Reggie Corbin – Illinois 
Corbin has all the traits that you want to see in a running back. He’s quick, has decent size, good vision, and very capable as a pass catcher as well. Corbin showed a little bit of all of this on Monday, starting off with a great read of the defense where we managed to cut back outside for a long gain. It was a nice combination of vision and quickness.

We really saw Corbin’s speed pop out at us later on in practice. Going one-on-one with a linebacker, Corbin was too much to handle as he used his speed to get open almost instantly. Corbin showed no issues being able to go turn up the field after making receptions and looks to be the type of running back that can handle playing all three downs. Corbin is a muscular back with a high level of speed to match it.

RB James Robinson – Illinois State 
If we’re talking about fast running backs, you can’t have the conversation without Robinson in it. Robinson is just as fast, if not faster that fellow Shrine Bowl teammate Corbin, and you can see why Robinson has been compared to Arizona Cardinals running back David Johnson. Robinson may lack some size but that doesn’t mean he’s afraid to run in between the tackles.

Robinson is also a versatile back, who is just as comfortable as a receiver as he is a runner. Coming from Illinois State, Robinson may not have as much notoriety as some other players this week, but that could change as he continues to make plays.

OT Julian Good-Jones – Iowa State 
The former Cyclone provided a mixture of power and mobility during the first day of practice. Good-Jones was able to move around quite athletically, which is not always the strongest suit of an offensive lineman. The Bucs will be looking to see if they can upgrade from Demar Dotson at right tackle, and Dotson is not as quick as he once was with getting to pass rushers on the edge, so an influx of an agile tackle would be welcomed. Good-Jones was often used to pull in both the run and screen game, showing that he can be trusted with various assignments.

In the video above, Good-Jones got the better of defensive end Derek Tuszka, who arguably had one of the best practices among defensive players. Good-Jones stayed firm once engaging in the block and went step for step as his opponent tried to get to the outside. On the day, Good-Jones was consistent overall, and that’s exactly what you want to see from an offensive lineman.

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cgmaster27

As a noles fan, i can tell you Keith gavin will drop one out of every 2 passes you throw to him. Wouldn’t even waste a roud 5 pick on him. Maybe it just wasn’t the right sitiation for him at fsu, but he played well below his star level.

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GermanBucsFan

For all the RB’s in here and every other article comming before the draft – can they block?
Because if I got BA right, you can not block, then in that case the only time you can use our speed is from the bench to the locker room to take an urgent piss

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surferdudes

Spent a lot of time on what we don’t need, a WR from FSU.

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cgmaster27

What does where hes from have to do with anything?

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EastEndBoy

“The Bucs will be looking to see if they can upgrade from Demar Dotson”…the Bucs need to upgrade from Donovan Smith.

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TheBaron70

Having seen Corbin 3 times this year in person, I can tell you he’d be a great pick later in the draft. Illinois wasn’t great this year, but he’s got talent. He’s one of those players that made linemen look better because he got yards even though the blocking was suspect. I think Corbin is an OK blocker. Two things I saw from him that he needs to stop doing we – 1) he commits too early in his block by diving at legs and can easily get faked out by defenders. 2) he’s small and he sits back in… Read more »