The 2020 NFL Draft class offers at least six starting-caliber running backs before falling off dramatically, but there are still a couple of Day 3 options who can make an impact in a part-time role. I limited my rankings to 10 backs because, as I watched some prospects that didn’t make the cut (UCLA’s Joshua Kelley, Memphis’ Patrick Taylor, Jr.), I realized it wasn’t going to be productive for me to write about more late-round talents.

I’d like to get to Maryland’s Anthony McFarland, Vanderbilt’s Ke’Shawn Vaughn and maybe a few others before the draft, but given the dependency of running backs’ success on blocking and scheme, it’s not a position I typically prioritize a deep dive into during the draft cycle.

One note before we get started: I don’t factor positional value into my grades, so although plenty of the backs below carry a second-round grade in a vacuum, as an NFL team I probably wouldn’t consider any of them until at least Round 3. It’s unlikely they’ll make an above-replacement level impact consistently enough to be worthy of a valuable pick.

Enjoy!

10. A.J. Dillon, Boston College (6-0, 247, 4.53)

Dillon is a certified athletic testing freak for the running back position, running 4.53 and jumping 41 inches at nearly 250 pounds! Unfortunately, that athleticism does not show up on tape, as Dillon is much more of a plodding back than his 40-time would suggest.

The problem with over-hyping running backs’ 40 times is that the result rarely matters much for the position unless a prospect is prohibitively slow. You just don’t have big, chunk runs that often in the NFL, and if you do there is usually so much space for you to work in that it’s okay if you don’t have elite speed.

How running backs move in smaller areas is much more important, and that’s where Dillon leaves something to be desired. He’s mildly elusive for his size, but everything he does is pretty slow, and there isn’t much suddenness or explosiveness to his game. Combine that with a minimal receiving profile and you have a big, battering ram of a back who might find value near the goal line, but will likely never be a preferred every-down option in the NFL.

Grade: 5th Round


9. Darrynton Evans, Appalachian State (5-10, 203, 4.41)

Usually when non-Power 5 backs get attention it’s because they do one of two things: break a ton of tackles or show really dynamic ability in space with the ball in their hands. But … that isn’t Evans.

Don’t get me wrong, Evans’ vision and instincts as a runner are so good that he almost always puts himself in position to win on a given carry, and he can cut into creases of space without losing a ton of speed, which is valuable. But as much as Evans may win with his mind and his eyes, he simply doesn’t play to his athleticism very often, which limits his impact.

I think running backs like Evans grow on trees, so I’ll probably value him a little lower than others. He simply doesn’t offer anything special in the pass game, he has very little pass protection experience and he won’t make many defenders miss in space or in tight quarters. Evans is a good player who will get some run in an NFL backfield early in his career, but he’ll be pretty dependent on a great offensive line in order to make a major impact.

P.S. With Evans’ vision and speed, he might be an ideal return guy in the NFL. He had one kickoff return touchdown every year he was on the field at App. State. That will drive up his value for NFL teams.

Grade: 4th Round


8. Eno Benjamin, Arizona State (5-9, 207, 4.57)

Man, what a competitor. As aware as I am of the limitations of Benjamin’s game, it was fun to watch him compete on tape. I don’t get to watch many PAC-12 games during the college football season, so watching Benjamin throw his diminutive frame at edge rushers when releasing out of the backfield and bust his tail downfield to block for a scrambling Jayden Daniels was a lot of fun.

Benjamin can add value to the depth of any backfield because of his receiving ability, but beyond that he’s little more than a change-of-pace runner. His vision is spotty and his decision-making can be too aggressive for a player without elite athletic traits. Benjamin doesn’t break tackles at a high rate despite his willingness to take on tacklers, so he’s of little use when things get congested or trouble arises in the backfield.

He does catch the ball well (77 catches over the past two seasons) and has the intensity and elusiveness to be a factor in space, which gives him third-down value. I doubt we’ll ever see Benjamin in a feature role at the next level, but if he can improve his technique in pass protection, he can stick in the league.

Grade: 4th Round


7. J.J. Taylor, Arizona (5-5, 185, 4.61)

On tape I honestly wanted to put Taylor in Round 3, but the peripheral aspects of his evaluation (size, NFL Scouting Combine, fumbles) push his numerical grade into Round 4, which is still probably 2-3 rounds before he’ll get drafted.

Taylor does everything valuable at the running back position – elusiveness, burst, receiving, contact balance, routes – on a solid-to-great level, which will immediately get him a role on an NFL team if the depth ahead of him isn’t too significant. Guys like Taylor have tended to stick in the league despite size and athleticism limitations because they can be so valuable with the ball in their hands in space as a receiver or in the open field as a runner.

And don’t let Taylor’s size fool you. Being 185 pounds at 5-foot-5 means he is one rocked up dude, and he’s lowered the boom on several defenders throughout his career at Arizona. Taylor is extremely tough and physical, with way better contact balance than you’d expect given his size. Don’t get me wrong, Taylor won’t be a feature back in the NFL, but he should play a key role in a rotation if he can show his value as a receiver in camp.

The problem is that running backs who are his size and run 4.61 40s don’t get a lot of room for error in the NFL. They probably won’t get drafted high, or maybe at all, which puts them behind the eight ball before they even get started. Not only do they have to ball out on every limited preseason opportunity behind porous offensive lines, but they also can’t afford to make many mistakes.

That’s why, even though I’m confident that Taylor can play a productive role in the NFL, he’s at a position where he is somewhat reliant on who he sees the field with in order to leave a strong impression, so the climb is decidedly uphill. I’d stand on the table for him though.

Grade: 4th Round


6. Zack Moss, Utah (5-9, 223, 4.65)

Probably the best tackle-breaking back in the entire draft, Moss absorbs some crazy shots and keeps twisting and fighting and falling forward. He’s not a violent runner, but his balance through contact is awesome to watch, and it gets him out of some impressive jams. Combine that with good vision and a low center of gravity for a big back, and Moss is a handful for defenders one-on-one.

My biggest concern with Moss is that I’m just not sure he moves at the speed necessary to avoid taking tons of hits at the next level. Part of the reason Moss breaks so many tackles is because so many defenders get a chance to line him up. He’s not the quickest decision-maker and might require his blockers to hold their ground a bit longer than some other backs, so consider that as you will if you want him in a zone scheme at the next level.

Moss is a reliable pass-catcher with great hands who will run through tacklers in space, and that’s perhaps his most valuable asset. His lack of speed and explosiveness will limit the splash plays, but he’s still going to have more of an impact than most backs in the pass game. I like Moss, and at the cost it’ll likely take to get him, he might end up being the best value at the position in this class.

Grade: 3rd Round


5. Jonathan Taylor, Wisconsin (5-10, 226, 4.39)

If you’re one of those god-forsaken NFL offenses that is just determined to be built on the running game, I might consider making Taylor the first running back off the board. The best part about Taylor’s game is his vision and patience as a runner. He knows exactly where runs should hit, when to cut, when to wait, when to get low, etc.

Being technically sound isn’t the most valuable trait for a running back in the NFL these days, but there’s definitely some assurance in drafting Taylor that he will not get you fired. He’s an extremely safe bet to be at least a solid, productive NFL running back at the next level, and he should be scheme diverse as well, although inside zone could be his best bet at success.

The reason why Taylor slides down these rankings is that he lacks the dynamic ability to be as versatile a threat as many other backs in this class, especially in the passing game. While I like his upside in the passing game after finally getting involved last season, the reality is that Taylor’s hands are highly suspect and his routes and pass protection are still very raw.

Given the way data studies have shown that success in the ground game is predicated more on blocking and scheme than an individual runner’s ability, I gravitate toward scouting for impact in the passing game and in space when watching running backs. Do they catch the ball well? What kind of routes do they run? Can they make a man miss in space (as a runner or receiver)? Do they break tackles? Can they pass protect? Are they a home run threat?

With Taylor, the answers to the above questions aren’t always favorable. Outside of his routes and ball skills, Taylor also isn’t the most elusive back in space nor the most creative with the ball in his hands. He’s at his best keeping things on script, when it comes to creating space and making defenders miss, Taylor isn’t inept, it just isn’t his best qualities.

The science of a man his size with a low center of gravity and the speed Taylor can move at will break some lower body tackles, but Taylor isn’t a violent or aggressive runner despite his size and athletic tools. That’s kind of a disappointing part of his game, he just doesn’t have the edge or tenacity to his running style that guys like LSU’s Clyde Edwards-Helaire and even Florida State’s Cam Akers have shown during their college careers.

In the end I think Taylor can end up being a good three-down running back in the NFL, but I do question if he’ll ever be as dynamic of a threat as the backs listed ahead of him. He’s certainly a good player with great character and a bright future, but his landing spot will be more critical to his success than other backs in the class because he can’t make an impact in quite as wide a variety of ways in the NFL. At least, not yet.

Grade: 2nd Round


4. J.K. Dobbins, Ohio State (5-9, 209)

I’m not sure Dobbins will do anything at an elite level in the NFL, but he’s probably going to be one of the safest picks in the draft. There’s nothing he really does poorly, and he can contribute right away as a rusher, receiver and pass protector.

Dobbins is probably best fit for a zone scheme with his vision and one-cut style of play, but he was pretty successful at everything Ohio State ran. He doesn’t have the elite burst, elusiveness or tackle-breaking ability that I prefer in my favorite backs, but Dobbins is still good enough in all three areas to check the box.

Ohio State often targeted Dobbins in the passing game, so that part of his game should transition easily to the NFL and he averaged a healthy 10 yards per catch. He’s taken his lumps in pass protection, but he had plenty of stellar moments on tape, too. There’s no reason Dobbins can’t handle a strong workload for an NFL franchise, even if there’s a relatively low ceiling on how special he can be at the next level.

Grade: 2nd Round


3. Cam Akers, Florida State (5-10, 217, 4.47)

I’m going to be higher on Akers than most people, because I gravitate toward running backs who can create in a jam, break tackles and make defenders miss. Akers does all of those things well, consistently making something out of nothing behind Florida State’s horrendous offensive line.

There are times when he tries to do too much, but I don’t think Akers vision is as bad as his detractors make it out to be. Sure, he bounces a decent amount of runs, but a lot of time he’s right to do so, and he has enough burst to make it happen at times. He can’t “Saquon Barkley” the NFL and expect good results, but Akers isn’t an athletic slouch either, and behind better blocking the hope is he’ll have more patience and trust in his offensive line.

Akers’ pass-catching ability is a work-in-progress and he will drop some passes, but he’s effective after the catch and has plenty of experience being targeted in the passing game. Akers won’t hesitate in pass protection either, delivering one heck of a performance against Clemson in perhaps his toughest test of the season.

I think Akers’ best football is ahead of him, and he’s already pretty darn good. He’s a running back, so the landing spot will matter a lot, but I’d take a slight risk on a back that can create like he can over safer options that teams will likely gravitate toward.

Grade: 2nd Round


2. D’Andre Swift, Georgia (5-8, 212, 4.48)

Remember, most running backs as pure rushers are very dependent on their blocking and scheme for success, at least until they work through the initial wave of defenders and into more space. Swift epitomizes this, as he doesn’t have the vision and anticipation to move linebackers and create creases up front for himself, but if you can get him through the initial hole with speed, he’s a nightmare at the next level.

Swift’s ability to make cuts at full speed also aid him as a route runner, where he consistently gets open even when aligning in the slot. He’s also surprisingly solid in pass protection for a smaller back, which will only add to his value as a rookie.

Swift isn’t a 20-25 carries-a-game type of back, but in today’s NFL that’s not a huge deal. Put him in a zone scheme behind a quality offensive line, let him play fast and make sure you get him touches in space, and you won’t be sorry with what he brings to the table.

Grade: 2nd Round


1. Clyde Edwards-Helaire, LSU (5-7, 207, 4.60)

If height and long speed are your top priorities for evaluating running backs, Edwards-Helaire probably won’t be for you. But you also probably haven’t been very successful at evaluating running backs, so let’s take a look at what CEH does offer.

Edwards-Helaire has elite vision and timing as a runner, frequently manipulating second-level linebackers before bursting through a crease up front. He’s a bowling ball to approaching defenders, using his nasty demeanor and low center of gravity to pick up yards after contact and break tackles at one of the highest rates in the nation.

But not only is he an excellent pure runner, but Edwards-Helaire is also the most accomplished receiving back in the class, catching 55 passes for 453 yards and doing it from a ton of alignments. He’s a detailed route runner (for a college running back) with reliable hands and the ability to make opponents miss after the catch.

In essence, there really isn’t much to be disappointed about in CEH’s game. He’s a great runner, a great receiver, he pass protects, he doesn’t fumble, he plays every snap 100 miles an hour and he doesn’t come off the field. Running backs are extremely dependent on their environment (blocking and scheme) for success on the ground, but CEH is the safest bet in the class to make an impact at the next level.

Grade: 2nd Round

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About the Author: Jon Ledyard

Jon Ledyard is PewterReport.com's newest Bucs beat writer and has experience covering the Pittsburgh Steelers as a beat writer and analyzing the NFL Draft for several draft websites, including The Draft Network. Follow Ledyard on Twitter at @LedyardNFLDraft
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BigSombrero
1 year ago

Darren Sproles 2.0 is the best RB in the draft? Lol.

Nevermind his 4.6 forty. He would have been better off NOT running it. He’s more Darren Sproles than MJD. A definite upgrade to Dare Ogunbawale as a 3rd down specialist. Great compliment if the Bucs can nab him in the 3rd. To spend a 2nd on him would be overpaying.

Spitfire
Reply to  BigSombrero
1 year ago

That’s why he said his round grades are in a vacuum and thinks they would be picked up later than their grade.

BigSombrero
Reply to  Spitfire
1 year ago

He mocked him to the Bucs in the 2nd recently.

DT25
Reply to  BigSombrero
1 year ago

Lol Darren Sproles is 5’6″ 190 lbs. JJ Taylor is far more Sproles than Helaire, who is nearly 20 lbs heavier. That’s just an terrible equivalency based solely on height and has zero basis in reality.

Corey
Reply to  BigSombrero
1 year ago

Apparently you didn’t watch LSU football and do no actual research on players he had 1400 yard rushing 16 TD on the ground and averaged almost 7 yards per carry witth no fumbles all this being in a pass heacy offense what are you talking about?

BigSombrero
1 year ago

Gentleman’s bet to you Mr. Ledyard…

Jon Taylor outproduces every runner on your top ten list. No excuses about scheme, depth charts, or injuries.

Bucko40
Reply to  BigSombrero
1 year ago

On this I will agree with you on. Taylor, Swift and Akers are my top 3 RB in this class. the height speed ratio scares me with CEH.

Dman
Reply to  BigSombrero
1 year ago

Agree – Taylor’s my favorite RB in this draft. I think he’s a three down back and would give RoJo a run for his money to be the starter in Week 1.

Dave
Reply to  BigSombrero
1 year ago

I’ll take that “gentleman’s bet” any time!

BigSombrero
Reply to  Dave
1 year ago

consider it a bet.

Gatordoc1
Reply to  BigSombrero
1 year ago

you bet a gentleman? I’d rather bet beer

Dave
Reply to  BigSombrero
1 year ago

$50 Taylor doesn’t get the most YFS for rookie RB’s? Any time

DT25
Reply to  BigSombrero
1 year ago

18 fumbles in his college career. Good chance he out performs a majority of this class in dropping the football too. Wouldn’t be surprised if he’s not even on the Bucs draft board after what happened to our last turnover prone player.

Dave
Reply to  DT25
1 year ago

Exactly! He’s not a good receiver, very fumble prone, can’t block, and was heavily reliant on the best line in fbs opening up huge holes. First 2 years in the league, he’ll be on the wrong end of a split backfield. If you can’t block, can’t catch, and can’t protect the ball, no coach is going to put you on the field enough to make a difference. He needs to be drafted by a team with a great Oline to be successful early in his career. Otherwise his career may take a few years to get off the ground.

Dave
Reply to  Dave
1 year ago

And with the huge workload he had in college, his upright running style, and the amount of contact he takes, it’s only a matter of time before the injuries start coming

BigSombrero
Reply to  Dave
1 year ago

I seem to recall it was Akers and CEH who had injuries throughout their college careers. I guess facts don’t matter.

It’s a Bucs life.

Dave
Reply to  BigSombrero
1 year ago

You seem to recall wrong, as usual. Akers MAY have missed 3 games in 3 seasons lol

BigSombrero
Reply to  Dave
1 year ago

Taylor missed 0. 41 games in 3 years. No injuries.

You hate him for no reason. He would make the Bucs better.

Corey
Reply to  BigSombrero
1 year ago

Hes average CEH 10c better look at the numbers and stop making them up

BigSombrero
Reply to  DT25
1 year ago

Akers had 10 lost fumbles on 655 touches in 3 years. 1.53% fumble rate.

Taylor had 15 lost fumbles on 986 touches in 3 years with over 3500 more career yards, including 955 yards after contact LAST YEAR ALONE.
1.54% fumble rate for his college career.

Next.

Dave
Reply to  BigSombrero
1 year ago

Akers can catch, Akers can block. Akers had one of the worst offenses in the country around him. Akers had a horrible line, stacked boxes, and multiple defenders in the backfield the second he touched the ball. Taylor had the best line in fbs, and had massive holes to run through.

Next

BigSombrero
Reply to  Dave
1 year ago

Last year Taylor had more receiving yards and receiving touchdowns than Akers. This is fun! #OWNED

Dave
Reply to  BigSombrero
1 year ago

And that means what? That you’re cool and can google stats? Congratulations! You’re so smart. I wish I was as smart as you! And yet not a single scout anywhere ever thinks Taylor is a better receiver than Akers. Weird huh?

awwdembucs
Reply to  Dave
1 year ago

I TOTALLY agree with you Dave!

DT25
Reply to  BigSombrero
1 year ago

Did you just say “Next.” after posting that Taylor still had a higher fumble rate?? Nice self-own.

I like Taylor as a runner…he’s not going to be our choice because 1) he ain’t a pass catcher, and 2) we just exiled a turnover-prone player. That’s just the truth, take it or leave it.

Dave
Reply to  DT25
1 year ago

He did lol. And no one brings up Akers fumbling as an issue for a reason. Because he had one of the absolute worst lines, and worst offenses in the country. Teams were stacking the box, and there were constantly multiple defenders in the backfield the second he touched the ball. A lot more understandable why he fumbled. He had to constantly fight for extra yardage to just gain positive yards. Taylor with that Badger OLine was getting 3+ yards before he was even touched. It’s not even a fair comparison. His ball security issue is much more of a… Read more »

BigSombrero
Reply to  DT25
1 year ago

A self own? Hilarious. The guy has twice as many TDs and 3 times as many yards rushing in the Big 10 vs. Akers in the PATHETIC ACC(Duke, Wake BC, Vande, etc) but the 0.01 difference in fumble rate per carry is the hill you’ll defend?

Taylor could go to any team and be better than Akers on the Chiefs, 49ers, Seahawks, Titans, BUCS, or anyone else. He’s a stud RB and you guys are HOMERS.

Jdgamble31
1 year ago

Yea I agree with you guys. My top 5 would be the inversion of Jon’s.
1.Taylor
2.Dobbins
3. Akers
4. Swift
5. CEH

But I’d be stoked if the Bucs came with any of them , preferably by using a 2nd or 3rd round pick.

GO BUCS !!

Spitfire
1 year ago

Holly cow I want the Oline Taylor was running behind. You could drive Tanks through the holes they were making for him! Taylor’s speed sounds great but he didn’t look that fast on tape and the Fumbles are scary scary scary. We are obviously on a path to less turnover and a RB that fumbles is one of the worst things ever. CEH looked more elusive and tackle breaking than you think he would be. I liked his hands. The size does scare me a little when he goes up against giants in the NFL, but sometimes small guys can… Read more »

Dave
Reply to  Spitfire
1 year ago

100% spot on about Taylor. He’s so incredibly overrated. He ran behind truck size holes that you or I could drive through. Akers would have dreamed to have blocking half as good as Taylor had. Plus his cute 40 time, and pass catching drills in shorts is a mirage. His game speed is nowhere near his timed speed in shorts. And he’s a below average receiver. And 18 fumbles in 41 games? His ball security is horrific. And if that’s not enough, he’s below average in pass pro. If you can’t catch, can’t block, and can’t hold onto the ball,… Read more »

BigSombrero
Reply to  Dave
1 year ago

Poor analysis Dave. Taylor had the most yards after contact in the entire college ranks last year. 955 yards of his 2k were after contact at or near the line of scrimmage. Then he just ran away from people.

He gets skinny in the hole and his feet are extremely quick, which is how he avoids injury on 986 touches.

CEH is great, but he’s a 3rd down gadget, not a workhorse who a team like seattle can close games out with.

Dave
Reply to  BigSombrero
1 year ago

Nope actually it’s great analysis. Not all “yards after contact” are treated the same. His “contact” came in the second level because of the massive holes his line opened up. Much easier breaking free of contact against LB’s and DB’s than it is from DE’s and DT’s. Yards after contact in the 2nd level isn’t the same as yards after contact in the 1st level. Because of the massive holes, he was always to the 2nd level. With that upright running style, good luck in the NFL without the Wisconsin OLine opening up massive holes. Instead of breaking contact in… Read more »

BigSombrero
Reply to  Dave
1 year ago

The great ones make it look easy. They also make everyone else look good.

During the games the announcers and analysts say over and over how great his feet are. How great his vision at finding daylight is. How great he is at taking what’s available. How great he is at running away from everyone. He’s next level bro – you’ll see.

Dave
Reply to  BigSombrero
1 year ago

After he fumbles….yet again, do they say how bad his ball security is? Or do they continue to sugar coat it because it’s a home broadcast lol

BigSombrero
Reply to  Dave
1 year ago

Jim Nance didn’t sugarcoat anything.

DT25
Reply to  BigSombrero
1 year ago

So I just realized you seem to be under the impression we’re looking for a workhorse RB. That’s not the case and has been made clear by both Licht and Arians…both have been specific in saying we’re looking for a 3rd down guy to compliment RoJo…a guy like Edwards-Helaire. We ain’t replacing our 22 year old RB who we drafted in the 2nd round 2 years ago. I’d try to get that expectation out of your head now so you aren’t disappointed in 10 days.

Dave
Reply to  DT25
1 year ago

Thank you! Pretty much what I’ve been saying for weeks now. We’re not looking for a 3 down back. We never were. RJ made a huge year 2 leap. And if he wasn’t splitting carries with slow, plodding, 3 yards and a cloud of dust Barber, he could have really had a nice year. Barber was the reason our team rushing totals were so bad(which in turn makes our run blocking seem bad). Replacing Barber with someone that can catch and run, along with RJ in year 3, a first round tackle like Thomas, and the monster upgrade in QB,… Read more »

PewterPose
Reply to  Spitfire
1 year ago

All these points are on the money. Watch that tape of CEH eviscerating Auburn and Alabama. Then look at those canyons Taylor gets to run through against Michigan.

Dave
Reply to  PewterPose
1 year ago

PewterPose. Omg seriously! The holes that Taylor got to run through weren’t even fair. Akers had 1 or 2 defenders already in the backfield the second he touched the ball. He was constantly having to make multiple defenders miss just to gain positive yardage. The difference in the line Taylor ran behind versus the one Akers ran behind is comical. On a neutral line, with a neutral QB, I’d take Akers all day. Taylor is reliant on a great line, where as if Akers gets drafted by a bad line, he’s used to it. But if he can get drafted… Read more »

BigSombrero
Reply to  Dave
1 year ago

Interesting logic Dave.

Akers is great because he didn’t produce much behind a very poor line at FSU, but when he gets to 29th ranked rushing team in Tampa, he will suddenly be more productive and an instant asset to Tom Terrific who’s in his first year in BAs offense?

Meanwhile Taylor’s line was so good that none of them are going to be drafted in the first 3 rounds but that’s only because the didn’t jump out of a swimming pool like Wirfs did.

Have another beer.

Dave
Reply to  BigSombrero
1 year ago

Interesting, you literally made up stuff that I didn’t say. Maybe you should learn how to read, and not put words in my mouth. I said he’s going from a non existent offense to one that is stacked. And that he’s used to bad line play, so he’s not reliant on great blocking to succeed. And their running game was ranked 29th because their crappy QB, and below average secondary put them down early and often so they had to abandon the run. Their OLine was ranked as the 7th best OLine in the league. But Dotson is 34 and… Read more »

BigSombrero
Reply to  PewterPose
1 year ago

Lol. Who else did Auburn and Alabama have to worry about when playing LSU last year? Joe Burrow maybe? Go back and look at his production before Burrow.

2018 CEH didn’t do shit. Same for 2017. I’ve linked the stats.
31 yards rushing in 2017
658 rushing with 94 receiving in 2018.

https://www.espn.com/college-football/player/_/id/4242214/clyde-edwards-helaire

BigSombrero
Reply to  Spitfire
1 year ago

Their O line is soooo good, that the highest rated guy is Biadasz with a 3rd/4th round grade. 955 yards AFTER contact for Taylor. #1 in America.

Dave
Reply to  BigSombrero
1 year ago

It is. Best line in fbs. Everyone knows it except you apparently.

Dave
Reply to  Dave
1 year ago

And the they only have 1 OLineman being drafted….that’s because Biadasz was the only returning player on the OLine. And yet, they’re still the best. They’re an OLine factory

TBxTB
1 year ago

I have to say initially I was much higher on Swift then CEH, but after rewatching a lot of his film I think he would like great in pewter. If all 4 tackles are gone at 14 I would love to see the Bucs trade down, take Jones and use some of that draft capital to get CEH. He may be there in the 2nd round when we pick, but I don’t know if I would want to roll the dice on that. The pass blocking and catching really appeals to me. Seems like the perfect safety valve for Brady.… Read more »

PewterPose
1 year ago

Sure, Taylor looks like a prototypical three-down back. That’s because he’s running behind a Wisconsin Offensive Line. You know who else looked NFL ready at Wisconsin? Melvin Gordon, Montee Ball, Brian Calhoun, Michael Bennett, and Ron Dayne – those are your last five Badger RBs drafted in rounds 1-3. Look at those clips of Taylor. Power and speed, sure, but very linear and not much of a pass-catcher. Don’t know about pass-blocking, but I’m gonna guess he wasn’t asked to do much of it since Wisconsin runs three out of four downs. He just doesn’t have the elusiveness or vision… Read more »

BigSombrero
Reply to  PewterPose
1 year ago

Reminds me of a guy named Arian Foster or maybe even Robert Smith. Probably before your time.

Dave
Reply to  PewterPose
1 year ago

Bad pass blocker. He does 1 thing good, and everything else below average to horrendous. Put him on Fla St with the line and offense Akers had, and he would barely be a top 4 round pick. Wisconsin has far and away the best line in fbs, and the holes he had to run through weren’t even fair. Anyone would have been successful with that many carries behind that offensive line. Anyone

magoobee
1 year ago

Personally, if I were the Bucs I would wait and draft Antonio Gibson in Rd 4. I know he is being listed as a WR but he was RB in college. He can be used like James White was with the Pats.

magoobee
1 year ago

Didn’t I see a while back that someone on Pewter Report had the Bucs taking Jonathan Taylor with pick 14?

Dave
Reply to  magoobee
1 year ago

They came to their senses lol

fanofdabucs
1 year ago

This Big Sombrero character is clueless.

Edward is a top end RB that is closer to Mark Ingram or Emmitt Smith than Sproles.

What a joke.

BigSombrero
Reply to  fanofdabucs
1 year ago

“Polly want a cracker! Polly want a cracker!”

“CEH is Emmitt Smith. CEH is Mark Ingram. CEH is MJD.”

CEH wasnt’ shit without 24 year old college QB Joe Burrow passing unstoppably against all those college kids. CEH is a 3rd down back who lacks top end speed or size or hands or blocking.

He sure as HELL isn’t anywhere in the vicinity of Emmitt Smith. You are a foolish clown if you think that.

Alldaway 2.0
1 year ago

I like CEH but I wouldn’t rank him #1.

DerLutz
1 year ago

Looks like I’m one of the few people who also have Swift and CEH as the best RBs in this class. Taylor may be the best pure runner and reminds me a lot of Adrian Peterson, but today the RB needs to have an impact in the passing game. And this means MORE than catching a ball in the flat. Especially for the Bucs CEH ist the best fit of all RBs. RoJo is a solid Runner and CEH fills the David Johnson role in Arians System. No way Taylor can do this. Yes, the 40 sucks but how often… Read more »

Greg Abdul
1 year ago

the guy you say is best is ranked as a third rounder on the boards I follow,but I really hope teams draft off your evaluation…somebody gonna loot and take the booty….after the suckers line up taking mini backs who run 4.6.