The Bucs have successfully built their roster in a number of ways, and one of them is by speed.

From adding a track star like Cyril Grayson Jr. to finding the small school blazers that run 4.3’s like Scotty Miller and Jaelon Darden, the Bucs know what they’re looking for.

Even on defense, they’ve taken players that could double as Olympic sprinters. Cornerback Jamel Dean was one of the fastest at his position in the 2019 draft class. They continued that this year, drafting Zyon McCollum in the fifth round of the 2022 NFL Draft. He ran a 4.3-second 40-yard dash as well.

So, who is the fastest player on the Bucs? We asked Grayson that question on the Pewter Report Podcast and his answer was a little surprising.

“It’s a bunch at the top that are really fast,” Grayson said. “Rashard Robinson might be the fastest one on the team. Might be the fastest one. Really fast, you see him running across the field catching people sometimes.”

Robinson also went to LSU like Grayson did. He played for three different teams before signing with the Bucs last year. Robinson played in seven games for Tampa Bay in 2021, recording seven tackles while spending most of the season on the practice squad. He signed a futures contract with the Bucs in 2022.

We also asked Grayson to rank the top five fastest players. And while he didn’t give a definitive answer, he listed out a lot of candidates.

“You have Jamel Dean, who would probably be a part of the 4×1 [track meet] as well,” Grayson said. “And then you have me, Scotty, Vyncint [Smith], Breshad [Perriman] and then, damn, you got Mike [Evans] and Chris [Godwin]. I don’t know, I can’t even put it in a good order.”

And then Grayson said something that I’ve been asking for on the podcast.

“I think we should just line it all up and see who wins,” Grayson said.

It didn’t sound like Todd Bowles or the coaching staff would be OK with it.

“Never happening.”

It also wouldn’t be a competition if fellow LSU alumnus Devin White didn’t get involved. White has tried to challenge other players before, even running barefoot.

“None of the linebackers want to be a part of that,” Grayson said.

It sounds like we’ll need to bring our stopwatches to training camp to determine a winner out of everyone on the roster. You can watch the entire episode of the podcast with Grayson here.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqeh84GMm9Hf7365M9lRYw

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About the Author: Matt Matera

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Robert
Robert
1 month ago

When did Jaelon Darden run a 4.3 40? His 4.46 40 yard time is fast for normal people but not NFL elite. I’m pretty sure his name shouldn’t even be in this article.

Eddie
Eddie
Reply to  Robert
1 month ago

And it showed during returns when he could not get to the edge before getting caught, time after time.

warren
warren
1 month ago

If Dean is fast, I haven’t seen it. Same with Darden. But the bottom line is that being fast is only one of many pieces (including change of direction, power, smarts, etc.) that make a good football player. Only a few WRs like Tyreek Hill get to use blinding straight ahead speed in a game, and that’s only on a few plays.

Eddie
Eddie
1 month ago

I was fortunate to watch Dion Sanders played in real game in person multiple times. He had legit 4.3 speed. He used to bait the opposing QB that their receiver had beaten Sanders off the line and throw the ball. But Sander would use his speed to beat the receiver to the ball for an interception. This happened frequently. So speed maybe one of the many pieces but a big piece. It also allows one to overcome somewhat lapses in coverage.

scubog
scubog
1 month ago

They saying is, “you can’t teach speed”. What’s more important is knowing which direction to go before launching oneself in the wrong direction……….really fast. Hmmmmm, who does that?