PewterReport.com has learned that veteran defensive tackle Gerald McCoy is not expected to attend this week’s voluntary two-day mini-camp, which begins Tuesday afternoon at AdventHealth Training Center at One Buccaneer Place prior to the 2019 NFL Draft. McCoy has not attended the team’s previous Phase I offseason conditioning program, which is also voluntary.

Will McCoy’s absence be due to his own decision not to attend, or will this be the result of the Bucs not asking McCoy to show up because of the risk of potential injury that could all but guarantee his massive $13 million salary this year? We’ll find out as we ask head coach Bruce Arians that question following practice after Bucs general manager Jason Licht ducked it last week during his press conference and told the media to ask Arians.

McCoy, who turned 31 in February, is not expected to be part of the Bucs’ future. While still considered to be a very good player, McCoy’s sack production has declined over the recent years and he has produced just six sacks in each of the last two years.

Bucs DT Gerald McCoy – Photo by: Cliff Welch/PR
Bucs DT Gerald McCoy – Photo by: Cliff Welch/PR

Both Licht and Arians have been asked numerous times this offseason if McCoy would be a part of the team moving forward, but would only give vague answers about McCoy’s future in Tampa Bay.

The Buccaneers reportedly are less than $2 million under the salary cap, and would need to clear room just to be able to sign their upcoming draft picks, so keeping McCoy, and his $13 million salary seems highly unlikely.

Last month in Arizona at the League’s Annual Meetings, Arians commented on McCoy’s salary versus his production and value.

“I’ve got to evaluate him,” Arians said. “Guys at a certain age, it’s different. Usually the age where they get paid the most and production [doesn’t] match. We’ve got to find that out.

“He’s not as disruptive as he was as we was four years ago. He’s still a good player. If he’s here, he’s our starting three [technique]. No doubt about that.”

Those words might just be lip service because if McCoy doesn’t attend the mini-camp or was asked not to come, how will Arians be able to evaluate him?

Shop the newest Tampa Bay Buccaneers fan gear at Fanatics!
Previous articlePewter Report And Pin Chasers Spring Bowling League Starts May 8
Next articleFinal 2019 Bucs Mock Draft Roundup
Mark Cook currently is the director of editorial content and Bucs beat writer and has written for PewterReport.com since 2011. Cook has followed the Buccaneers since 1977 when he first began watching football with his Dad and is fond of the 1979 Bucs team that came within 10 points of going to a Super Bowl. His favorite Bucs game is still the 1979 divisional playoff win 24-17 over the Eagles. In his spare time Cook enjoys playing guitar, fishing, surfing and family time at the beach. In addition, Cook can be found in front of a television or in Doak Campbell any time the FSU Seminoles are playing. Cook is a native of Pinecrest in Eastern Hillsborough County and has written for numerous publications including the Tampa Tribune, In the Field and Ya'll Magazine. Cook can be reached at [email protected]

10 COMMENTS

  1. Can we move on already? If the Bucs, and B.A. wanted him, he’d be here. Every coach McCoy has ever had came out the day they were hired, and proclaimed McCoy the corner of the franchise. All those coaches are gone, all the losing, the one constant, McCoy. Arians has played McCoy twice, and both times he was a no factor in a blow out. I’m glad B.A. calls it like he see’s it, an ageing vet, making way to much money, and has never been no where near a difference maker. He doesn’t have that killer attitude I think B.A. is looking for, it was never a good fit. Time to let it end.

    +23
    0
    Rating: +23. From 23 votes.
    Please wait...
  2. Well said surferdudes….

    +3
    0
    Rating: +3. From 3 votes.
    Please wait...
  3. Agree with above and don’t care. Lol. It really doesn’t matter if he’s there in camp or not either imo. He’s going to be gone one way or another and I’m glad it’s time to move on. I want a more aggressive coach and team.

    +4
    0
    Rating: +4. From 4 votes.
    Please wait...
  4. If the Bucs still want him and he still wants to be here, then they’ll restructure his deal. The best scenario for both sides would be a trade. The Bucs would get something in return, plus salary cap relief. He gets to keep his $13 million for this year and gets a fresh start somewhere else and maybe finally gets to the playoffs. He either has never been utilized correctly or when he was he never had any talent around him, or got injured. He’s never had one full season where he was in right scheme, had talent around him, and stayed healthy. He made a ton of money here in Tampa, so he should be happy for that. For us Bucs fans it was a waste of potential as we witnessed what a dominating two-technique DT can do be it Warren Sapp for us or John Randle against us.

    +3
    -1
    Rating: +2. From 4 votes.
    Please wait...
  5. I am leaning towards DT or OLB/EDGE with the first pick. Any of the top guys will do. Then go with the opposite spot in the second, unless a really good OG or OT fall to us in the second. As much as we need Oline help, PLEASE do not take one in the first round unless we trade way back. I don’t think any of them are of the can’t miss variety that would warrant a pick anywhere in the top half of the first.

    +3
    0
    Rating: +3. From 3 votes.
    Please wait...
  6. @bucup The Bucs don’t want him and neither does any other team at $13 million. He’s just not very good. If he was, there would be a trade market for him.

    +5
    -1
    Rating: +4. From 6 votes.
    Please wait...
  7. @bigsombrero Would you and can we by league rules trade him, but cover a small portion of his salary – say $2m or so. [no idea how this affect salary cap] Maybe get a better pick and grease the skids for a deal. And would this be better than an outright release. No matter what, not a good situation for the Bucs.

    +2
    0
    Rating: +2. From 2 votes.
    Please wait...
  8. Agreed, trading for McCoy and his $13 million/yr is something only the Bucs would do! Like when we traded for Revis when he was coming off an ACL injury and it was widely known that he would probably get released after the draft. Nobody was going to give up the picks that we did, plus give him a pay raise to $16 million/yr. Also, like when we gave two first rounders for Meshawn Johnson who wasn’t even a Top 5 or maybe Top 10 WR.

    +2
    0
    Rating: +2. From 2 votes.
    Please wait...
  9. @Dman Good question. Not sure about the Bucs picking up part of the deal to facilitate a trade. I’m not sure any late round pick would draw a $2m salary over their entire career, so why pay $2m+GMC to acquire the (5th,6th,7th round?)pick? I do know that players and their representatives may be able to negotiate to agreeable terms with the new team before the trade occurs. Earlier this year Robert Quinn was traded to Dallas from Miami for a 6th round pick. He had one year remaining on his deal when he was traded and he restructured from $11m down to $8m.

    In a deep draft at DT, Frank Clark was just traded from Seattle to Kansas City for a 1st in 2019 and 2nd in 2020.

    +3
    0
    Rating: +3. From 3 votes.
    Please wait...
  10. Thanks, BigS. There’s got to be a way. My guess is there will be a trade during the draft for a DT needy team that didn’t get their guy. At least that’s my hope. Worst case we release him and get nothing. He gets a hearty handshake, a fat bank account and a new start.

    +2
    0
    Rating: +2. From 2 votes.
    Please wait...